1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Abbey/English Cluniac

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Abbey sub-article navigator
  1. Santa Laura
  2. Vatopede
  3. Benedictine
  4. Canterbury Cathedral
  5. Westminster Abbey
  6. York
  7. English Cluniac
  8. Cistercian
  9. Clairvaux
  10. Citeaux
  11. Kirkstall Abbey
  12. Fountains Abbey
  13. Austin Canons
  14. Bristol Cathedral
  15. Premonstratensians
  16. Carthusians
  17. Clermont
  18. Mendicant Friars
  19. Norwich; Gloucester
  20. Hulne
  21. Cells

English Cluniac[edit]

The first English house of the Cluniac order was that of Lewes, founded by the earl of Warren, c. A.D. 1077. Of this only a few fragments of the domestic buildings exist. The best preserved Cluniac houses in England are Castle Acre, Norfolk, and Wenlock, Shropshire. Ground-plans of both are given in Britton's Architectural Antiquities. They show several departures from the Benedictine arrangement. In each the prior's house is remarkably perfect. All Cluniac houses in England were French colonies, governed by priors of that nation. They did not secure their independence nor become "abbeys" till the reign of Henry VI. The Cluniac revival, with all its brilliancy, was but short-lived. The celebrity of this, as of other orders, worked its moral ruin. With their growth in wealth and dignity the Cluniac foundations became as worldly in life and as relaxed in discipline as their predecessors, and a fresh reform was needed.