1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Newark (Ohio)

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search

NEWARK, a city and the county-seat of Licking county, Ohio, U.S.A., at the confluence of three forks of the Licking river, on the Ohio Canal, and 33 m. E. by N. of Columbus. Pop. (1890) 14,270; (1900) 18,157, of whom 1342 were foreign-born and 300 were negroes; (1910 census) 25,404. Newark is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by inter-urban electric lines. It lies on a level plain, but is surrounded by hills. Along two of the forks of the Licking are some of the most extensive earthworks of the “mound builders”; they occupy about 3 sq. m., and have a great variety of forms: parallel walls, circles, semicircles, a parallelogram, an octagon, &c. About 10 m. S.W. and connected with Newark by electric line is Buckeye Lake, an artificial body of water about 3 m. long and 1 m. wide, frequented as a summer resort. Among the city's attractive features are Idlewilde Park and a beautiful auditorium, built as a memorial to the soldiers and sailors of the Civil War. Newark is the trade centre of an agricultural region, which also abounds in natural gas and coal; natural gas is piped as far as Cincinnati. The city has electric car and steam car shops and various manufactures, including stoves and furnaces (the most important), bottles, table glass-ware, cigars, rope halters, machine furniture and bent wood. The total factory product in 1905 was valued at $5,612,587, an increase of 94.9% over that in 1900. Newark was laid out about 1801 and was incorporated in 1813.

For an account of the earthworks see Gerard Fowke, Archaeological History of Ohio (Columbus, 1902).