1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Trinovantes

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TRINOVANTES (commonly Trinobantes), a powerful British tribe about 50 B.C.–A.D. 50 dwelling north and north-east of London, rivals and neighbours of the Catuvellauni. When Caesar invaded Britain 54 B.C. they joined him against their domestic rivals and it is possible (though not certain) that half a century after Caesar’s departure they succumbed to them. Certainly they were conquered by Rome in A.D. 43 and joined in Boadicea’s revolt in 61. In the tribal division of Roman Britain given by Ptolemy their land included Camulodunum (Colchester), but nothing more is known of them. But their name plays a part in medieval legends and romances. There it was interpreted as Troy Novant, the “new Troy,” and connected with the names of the Trojans Brutus and Corineus who were reputed to have given their names to Britain and Cornwell. (F. J. H.)