A Historical Sketch of the Town of Deer Isle

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A Historical Sketch of the Town of Deer Isle
by George L. Hosmer
With notices of its settlers and early inhabitants

Introduction[edit]

For some decades past it has been my purpose to write a historical sketch of the town with notices of its settlers and early inhabitants.


NOTICES OF SETTLERS AND EARLY INHABITANTS.[edit]

MICHAEL CARNEY[edit]

He was said to have been the first white man who attempted a settlement in the town. He was a native of Ireland, and was here as early as 1762 at least. He made his settlement on what is now the farm of George C. Hardy, on the northern shore of the island; the place where his habitation stood is still known, and it was shown me by Mr. Hardy a few years ago. How long he remained here is not known, as very few seem to have heard anything about him, and what little is known is through tradition. How long he came before Mr. William Eaton is not known, but in all probability it was not long, perhaps the same year. He moved from the place of his settlement to an island lying between Great and Little Deer Islands, which to this day bears his name; and from that place he removed, and all traces of him have been lost. Whether he had, a family or not is not known.

WILLIAM EATON[edit]

was the first man who made a permanent settlement here, and it was said to be in 1762. I have judged that his native place might have been Haverhill, Massachusetts, or that vicinity, as he was a cousin to Theophilus and Jonathan Eaton, who were born there, and he was about the age of the first named. He was married in York, Maine, to a member of the family of Mr. Eliakim Wardwell, of that place, in 1742. I have been told that her maiden name was Ruth, but the records of that town show that the marriage was between Mr. William Eaton and Miss Meribah Wardwell. There is a tradition that before her birth her mother was taken captive by the Indians, and while in captivity she was compelled to become the wife of one of the chiefs, and that Mrs. Eaton was the fruit of their union. Some of her descendants seem to show the probability of such an origin. Her husband was described to me by one of his granddaughters as a man of a light complexion. My informant was born in 1776, and well remembered him.


On the return of peace between the tribe by which she was held in captivity and the white people, Mrs. Wardwell was delivered up to her husband with her child. She afterward had children, the youngest of whom, Mr. Daniel Wardwell, settled in the town of Penobscot, where he died in 1803. He was the father of Colonel Jeremiah Wardwell, a man of note there, who died in 1825. A sister of Mrs. Eaton was the mother of Captain Joseph Perkins, one of the settlers in Castine, and he was there in 1779, when the British took possession of the place. He was one of the most prominent men of that town till his death in 1818, and was, with Colonel Wardwell, one of the first board of . selectmen in the town of Penobscot, in 1787. The father of Eliakim Wardwell was Mr. Samuel Wardwell, who suffered death during the delusion of witchcraft, and was a resident of Andover, Massachusetts. His father was the first of the family who came from England, and his name was Thomas Wardwell. Mr. Eaton, or, as he was called, Major Eaton, settled on what is now the Scott farm, near the steamboat landing. He resided there several years, when he sold out his possession to Mr. Nathaniel Scott, of what was then the town of Ward, now Auburn, in the county of Worcester, Massachusetts. He was the ancestor of all of that name here. His son, Mr. John Scott, occupied the farm after him. A daughter, Martha Scott, was the wife of Mr. Asa Green, who came here from Worcester County, who will be noticed hereafter.


After the sale of his right to Mr. Scott, Major Eaton moved to Little Deer Island, where he occupied the farm that was owned by Mr. Peter Hardy, Jr., at the time of his death in 1859. What time he moved there, I never knew, nor do I know the time of his death. His farm there, after his death, passed into the possession of Mr. Benjamin Weed, his son-in-law. Major Eaton left four sons and two daughters: one, Eliakim, settled on Little Deer Island and died there; Jeremiah, who settled on the farm since owned and occupied by the late Captain Amos Howard and now by his widow; William, who settled on the lot now owned and occupied by Mr. William E.' Powers and Mr. Francis M. Holden: he died not far from the year 1841 ; and Samuel, whose descendants live in the town of Brooklin. His daughters were the wives of Mr. Jonathan Torrey and Mr. Benjamin Weed.

GREENLAW[edit]

The next persons who came were five by the name of Greenlaw. They settled on Campbell's Neck, and the farm of Mr. Samuel W. Campbell, and that of Mr. William Foster's heirs-in all about five hundred acres. Their names were Jonathan, Charles, Alexander, Ebenezer, and William, and whether they were all brothers or not I do not know. They were natives of Scotland, and had emigrated from that country not long before, and were endeavoring to find a place to settle upon with which they might be suited. The places they took up did so, and they commenced settlements. After the occupation of Bagaduce by the British in 1779, they made frequent visits there, as they were zealous loyalists, and were suspected of carrying information - a cause of displeasure to their neighbors, who almost all were friendly to the American cause. They were the persons before spoken of as going with the British in 1783 to the Provinces, where they settled, and their descendants still reside there. Some time after, two of the, sons of Mr. Jonathan Greenlaw, Messrs. William and Richard Greenlaw, came back and remained till their deaths. They were brought back by the brothers-in-law of Mr. William Greenlaw, - Messrs. Joseph Whitmore and Captain Seth Hatch, -who went after them in a vessel.

JOHN BILLINGS.[edit]

He was the person who settled the lot lying southeasterly of, and adjoining, that of Mr. Eaton, on the shore of the Reach. He came here from Boston in 1763, and was the father of Mr. Timothy Billings, noticed as the first child born of white parentage in the town. How many years he resided here is not known, but it could not have been many, as his name does not appear among those who were styled proprietors. Whom he sold his right to we do not know, but at the time of Peters's' survey, in 1798, Mr. Josiah Closson held it. Whether the precise spot occupied by him can be now pointed out is to us unknown. From what information we have we should judge that he removed to Sedgwick. His sons were: Benjamin, who lived in that town, at what is called Sargentville, on the farm since occupied by his son, Mr. Nathan Billings; Abel, who lived and died in Sedgwick; Isaac and Solomon, both deacons of the Baptist Church, who lived and died in Brooksville: the former on the place now occupied by Frederick Billings, Esq., his son, the latter on the northwest side of Walker's Pond; Timothy, who occupied the northwestern lot on Little Deer Island, now owned by Mr. Michael D. Snowman; and Daniel, his youngest son, lived on the land now occupied by his son, Mr. Edward C. Billings. There was another son, John Billings, who died a young man, and a daughter was the wife of Mr. Samuel Howard, who took up the farm lying between those of Messni. Timothy and Daniel Billings, afterward owned by Captain John Gray.


NATHAN CLOSSON[edit]

He settled upon the lot of land adjoining that of Mr. Billings, on the southeast. He came, as has been understood, from Connecticut in 1763. He died not many years after that, but the date is to us unknown. His widow was entitled to a settler's right, which was occupied by her son, Mr. John Closson. Their children were: John, Josiah, and Nehemiah, who will be noticed. One of the daughters was the wife of Mr. Benjamin Billings, of Sedgwick, and another was the mother of the late Mr. #Joel Long, who lived in East Bluehill, and owned a sawmill there, and another was the wife of Mr. #John Carter, of Sedgwick.


It was the family of Mr Closson who captured the deer which was seen swimming across the Reach, of which an account has been before given. His son, Mr. John Closson, whose first wife was a Miss Tobin, and his second a Miss Snow, remained upon the place until his death in March, 1854, aged ninety years.

His sons by the former were:

  • Captain John Closson, who lived in Bluehill and died there, and
  • Mr. Isaac Closson, who resided in Searsport;

and by his last wife the present Franklin Closson, Esq.

His daughters were the wives of Mr. Ephraim Crockett, Captain Jonathan Bray, Mr. John Saunders, and Mr. Isaac Bray, and another married in Boston. They are all now dead, with the exception of the last, who was living a few years ago. Mr. Josiah Closson remained here some years, and his wife was a sister of the first wife of Mr. John Closson. He sold his farm to Captain Jonathan Torrey and removed to Sedgwick, where he died. One of his sons was Mr. Ephraim Closson, who traded near the meeting-house in North Sedgwick, where he died several years ago.

The youngest son of Mr. Nathan Closson was Deacon Nehemiah Closson, who filled that office for many years in the First Congregational Church here. He was a man much respected, and was considered a true Christian. By trade he was a blacksmith, and many years ago had a shop situated between the place now occupied by the house of Mr. William H. H. Spofford and the Masonic Building, which was afterward removed and placed near his house, which is now standing near that of Dr. F. B. Ferguson, where he died, not far from thirty years ago. His wife was Miss Sophia Johnson, who survived him several years, dying at the age of ninety-one years, as did the wife of Mr. John Closson, who died in 1862 at the same age. The son of Deacon Closson was Mr. George C. Closson, who removed from this town to the town of Fairfield, Somerset County, in this State, nearly forty years ago. His daughters were the wives of lVlr. Joshua Chatto; of a Mr. Carter, in Bluehill or Brooklin; of Captain John C. Bray, and afterward of Mr. Samuel Candage, of Bluehill; and the youngest, of Mr. Carruth, of Boston.

THOMAS THOMPSON[edit]

He settled upon the land adjoining that of Mr. Closson on the southeast. He removed here from Massachusetts not far from the year 1765. He was a man of a great deal of energy and in his time was one of the most prominent and enterprising citizens of the town and was one of its selectmen. He was of small stature, but he possessed a great share of courage, being perfectly fearless, was very active in what he undertook, and what he lacked in size he made up in what is generally termed" pluck." He was the owner of a considerable amount of land - about three hundred acres, as appears by the plan of Peters's survey, and his death took place not far from the year 1824, aged upward of eighty years. His wife, a very worthy woman, was the sister of Mr. William Foster, who, it will be noticed, died in the year 1836 at the age of ninety-one years. Their sons were: Adam, the father of the late Messrs. John, Solomon, and Edward B. Thompson, and the late Adam, Jr., Captain Dudley, and Hiram Thompson, and others deceased. His family consisted of nine sons and five daughters, who all lived to grow up. Another son of Mr. Thomas Thompson was Captain John Thompson, who was in his day an enterprising master-mariner, who died in Philadelphia; and another named Thomas, who died when a young man. The daughters were the wives of Major Nathan Low; Mr. Joseph Sellers; a Mr. Hazen, who lived in Bridgton, Cum berland County; Nathaniel Kennison, of Sedgwick; Colonel Edward Barnes, of Boston; and Mr. John Howard, Jr.

STAPLES[edit]

The occupant of the land adjoining that of Mr. Thompson on the southeast was a man named Staples. His widow, Mrs. Mercy Staples, with Joshua and Moses Staples, seems to have been here very early, not far from 1764. In all probability the sons above named were then quite young. There was another brother, who must at that time have arrived at manhood, who was the father of Mr. Samuel Staples, who died at Green's Landing, in 1841, aged seventy-three years. Samuel had one brother younger, named William, and two sisters, one, the wife of Mr. Stephen Babbidge, the other, that of Mr. Timothy Saunders. Their father was impressed on board of an English ship-of-war during the Revolution, when that iniquity was practised. He was never heard of after that, and probably died while in the service. Afterward, Mrs. Staples married a Mr. Hutchinson, of Sedgwick, by whom she had two sons and one daughter. The sons were Rev. David Hutchinson, a presiding elder in the Methodist Episcopal Church, in the western part of the State, and Mr. Timothy Hutchinson, who lived here many years and died on Little Deer Island; and the daughter was Susan, the wife of Captain Benjamin Gray, of Penobscot. Mr. Staples moved to Swan's Island, where he died in 1845, aged over ninety years. The other son, Joshua, in whose name the lot appears on the plan, married the daughter of Mr. John Raynes, Sr., who had one daughter, Jane Staples, who married Mr. Elias Morey, Jr., who lived and died on Swan's Island.

The mother, Mercy Staples, also had a settler's right, and it was known as the "Granny Lot," as she was known as "Granny Staples." She had a deed from the Tylers, and it passed from her to her son-in-law, Mr. Thomas Conary, by whom it was conveyed to the late Pearl Spofford, Esq., and is now held by his heirs. The lot set off to Joshua Staples afterward became the property of Major Nathan Low, and is now held by his heirs.

ROBERT LINN[edit]

was the occupant of the lot adjoining the Staples lot on the south. Of him we know comparatively little, for he left no descendants here. He came in 1765 and probably lived a number of years on his lot, and he conveyed his property to Joseph Tyler, Esq., for his support. Mr. Tyler liv'ed many years upon it and died there; and it will be stated more particularly, when we notice him among the inhabitants of that part of the town where he first had his residence. The farm is now occupied by Mr. James Tyler, and upon it are large quantities of marble. The Marble Company some years ago purchased the right on the property of Mr. Tyler and erected a large building upon the premises and put in machinery, but it proved a failure and was abandoned after some two or three years' operations. Whether it is of value or not we can not say, but there are large quantities of it in the vicinity.

JONATHAN TORREY.[edit]

He was the settler nearest to Mr. Linn on the southeast, but not on the adjoining lot, for that was afterward the property of Mr. Thompson. Mr. Torrey lived about three-fourths of a mile from Mr. Linn. He came from Falmouth, Maine, which then embraced the city of Portland and the present towns of Deering, Westbrook, and Falmouth, and in the town of Deering there are persons of that name now. He came in about the year 1763, and in 1767 married a daughter of Mr. William Eaton, and after her death he married a Mrs. Robinson, a daughter of the Mrs. Mercy Staples before spoken of. Another person, named David Torrey, was here, who had a settler's right, but did not stop many years, as no separate lot was assigned him; and he was perhaps a brother of the subject of this sketch. In all probability he assigned his right to Jonathan Torrey, as he had a two hundred-acre lot.

Mr. Jonathan Torrey lost his life by the capsizing of a boat near Cape Rozier, when returning home from Castine. His oldest son, David Torrey, was in the boat, and, being more vigorous, was able to keep upon its bottom, and for a while kept his father upon it with him; but as the water was cold he soon became chilled and fell off and was drowned, but David was soon after rescued. It has been stated that a certain man belonging to the town, who is now dead, passed them when they were both upon the bottom of the boat and made no effort to save them and afterward admitted that he saw them.

By his first wife, Mr. Torrey had five sons: David, born in 1768; William, who was the first husband of her who afterward married Mr. Amos Gordon, and the father of Mr. Hezekiah Torrey, who was the representative from the town in 1822, and of Mr. William Torrey, formerly well known here, who died on his passage to California around Cape Horn, and of the first wife of John P. Johnson, Esq. Another son was the late Captain Jonathan Torrey, born in 1774; who died of smallpox in 1847, and the father of the present Mr. David, Captains William and Belcher T. Torrey. Another son was Mr. David Torrey, who was the father of the late Captains Samuel, Daniel S., George W., and Davis H. Torrey, and the present Captain Francis H. Torrey and Mr. John Torrey, who lived and died on Newbury Neck in Surry. One of his daughters is the widow of the late Captain Jeremiah Hatch and formerly the wife of Mr. Johnson. The fifth brother was the late Captain John Torrey, who left no children; nor did Mr. David Torrey, whose widow died in 1879, aged ninety-seven years. By his second marriage Mr. Torrey had four sons: James, the father of Messrs. Amos and James, and the late Charles S. and Henry Torrey; and his only daughter was the former wife of Mr. George C. Hardy. Another son was Mr. Levi Torrey, who lived and died on Swan's Island; Deacon Asa Torrey, who died in Ellsworth, and the late Captain Ebenezer Torrey, the father of Mr. Nelson Torrey, and the wife of Franklin Closson, Esq. By the first marriage there were three daughters, who were the wives of Nathan Haskell, Esq., Mr. Jonathan Eaton, and Mr. Nathaniel Webster, who removed to Cape Elizabeth. Two of the daughters were afflicted with insanity - Mrs. Haskell and Mrs. Webster; and what was very singular, the one was rational while the other was insane, and a part of the time one would be afflicted; and when she recovered, the other would be taken insane. The real estate of Mr. Torrey is still owned and occupied by his descendants; the larger part was owned by the late Captain Daniel S. Torrey and is now owned by his widow.

WILLIAM FOSTER[edit]

was the nearest settler to Mr. Torrey on the southeast. He came, as we have understood, from Dedham, Masschusetts, and was by trade a blacksmith. In those days that trade was employed in the manufacture of many articles that are now by machinery made a specialty. Axes, both broad and narrow, and other edge-tools, hoes, pitchforks, ox-chains, and plow-irons, for those were the days of the clumsy wooden plows, which have long since gone out of use, and other articles which were rudely manufactured in comparison with those of our day. Of him Deacon Nehemiah Closson learned his trade, which he wrought at almost all his days. Mr. Foster settled upon a part of the land formerly occupied by the Greenlaw family, but whether he came here before they left or not is not known to us, but as he had a two-hundred acre lot it is probable that he purchased the rights of one of them at least, which with his own would entitle him to that quantity.

Both he and his wife died here many years ago, leaving a large family, for they were the parents of thirteen children, as I have understood. Only two of his sons remained, who both died here, Messrs. William and Samuel H. Foster, the former the father of Mr. George Foster, and the latter that of Mr. William H. and Charles H. S. Foster; and two daughters: one the present wife of Mr. Admiral G. Sawyer, and the other a Mrs. Smith, now residing in Boston. Mr. Foster, Sr., had one daughter, who was the wife of Captain John Howard, Jr., who died about fifty years ago of a cancer. Another was the wife of Mr. David J. Waters, who published a newspaper in Castine about the year 1800, and after his death married a Mr. Stephen Kidder, not a resident here, and after his death she became the wife of Mr. Samuel Obear, of Sedgwick. After the death of Mr. Kidder she removed to this town, and for many years kept a boarding-house in the house near that formerly occupied by the late Mr. William S. Green, known as the "Aaron Haskell" house. After her marriage with Mr. Obear she went to Lowell, Massachusetts to reside, where she had a daughter, Mrs. McIntire, and there she died. The real estate of Mr. Foster is now only in part occupied by his descendants.

JOHN CAMPBELL.[edit]

He was the occupant of the lot adjoining that of Mr. Foster on the south. He was a large landed proprietor, owning one lot of two hundred acres, another known as the Campbell's Neck lot of seventy-seven, and the island near known as Campbell's Island, of eighty-eight acres, and it is probable that he purchased the rights of some of the Greenlaw family, as he would of his own right be entitled to but one hundred acres. He was a native of Argyleshire in Scotland, and born, according to the inscription on his gravestone, about the year 1730, as he died in 1820 aged ninety years, as is there stated. He served for several years on board an English ship-of-war, but before his coming here resided in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The name of his wife was Mary Blunt. After the commencement of the Revolutionary War he wished to'renlain neutral, alleging that the struggle with such a power as Great Britain would be .vain,

as the Americans were too weak to be successful in the contest with her: but those were times when neutrality was not tolerated, and as he became an object of suspicion from such a desire he prudently removed from that place, but whether he came here directly after leaving there is to us unknown - nor is the time of his coming, but it was probably during the latter part of the war, for the Greenlaws left in 1783, and it must have been prior to their leaving if he purclfased the rights of any of them, and he remained till his death. There has been some doubt as to his age, some considering that he was over one hundred years of age from his stating that he had known of two rebellions in his time, one of which was in 1745; but if he meant the other, which was in 1715, he must have been much older than ninety years, but it is probable that one that he styled a rebellion was the Revolution. It is to be presumed that his family knew more than others about the matter,' and that the date of his birth was what is above stated. He left three sons, Messrs. Robert , George, and James Campbell, and two daughters; one was the wife of Captain Peter Hardy, Jr., and the other was first the wife of Mr. Dudley Carlton, of Sedgwick, and afterward that of Mr. Frederick Carman. Mr. Robert Campbell was the occupant of the larger part of his father's estate, and he died in 1866, aged ninety-two years. He was the father of the present Mr. Samuel W. Campbell and a daughter, Mrs. Mary Foss, who died in Dubuque, in the State of Iowa. Captain George Campbell was a resident of Newburyport, Massachusetts, at the time of his death, in 1828, at the age of forty-eight years, and the time of the death of Mr. James Campbell is to us unknown. Mrs. Hardy died not far from 1841, 'and Mrs. Carman in 1874, aged ninety years.

Captain Robert Campbell was for many years a mastermariner, and, we believe, sailed from Newburyport, where he married his wife. He made several voyages to the West Indies, and after he quit the business resided the remainder of his life upon his farm. There were not many years' difference in the death of himself and that of his wife, and she was over eighty years of age at her death. They had another son, Captain Robert Campbell, Jr., who resided near New York, who died many years ago. Mr. Samuel W. Campbell now owns and occupies' his real estate.

THOMAS STINSON, ESQ.[edit]

was the first settler on what is known as Stinson's Neck. He came from Woolwich, Maine, in 1765. He used to say that he might have selected a far more valuable place than the one he did, for the most valuable part afterward of the island was not then taken up; but the place he selected was very convenient for the procuring of sea-fowl and fish, both sea and shell, much more so than on some other parts. That was a great object with them, for the time required to put the land in order to obtain crops was too long, and in the meantime a supply must be had which could be procured as it was needed. In the vicinity of his residence was a very convenient place to take fowl by netting, the process of which has before been, explained; the method was far preferable to the taking -them by shooting, for when shot, at many times they became more shy and avoided the place where it was done. He was a man of piety, and was one of the deacons of the church, when first established here in 1773, and it has been said' of him that he held the first religious meeting that was ever in the town. Its occasion was the regret of his .wife, expressed one Sabbath day, that they could not have the privilege of attending them as in the place they came from, and he answered that she might have it on the next Sabbath day, and accordingly when the day came he took his wife and family with him to the place where a large tree 'stood near his house, and under its shade he performed the services usual on such occasions, reading a sermon. He was one of the first persons, as before mentioned, who held the commission of a justice of the peace here, and in his day was considered a man of integrity, and had considerable influence. His sons were: Thomas, Samuel, William, and John. One of his daughters was the wife of l\ir. Thomas Robbins, Jr., and the mother of the late Mr. William G. Robbins, and the wives of the late Mr. Richard Greenlaw, 2d, and Captain Asa Richardson, who is now, in 1881, living at the age of eighty-six years. Another daughter was the wife of Mr. George Adams, and the mother of the wife of Mr. Henry W. Hallett, who died here nearly forty years ago, and also that of the present Mrs. Saunders, the widow of the late Mr. Asa Saunders. The real estate of Mr. Stinson passed into the hands of his son, the late Mr~ John Stinson, and it is now the property of Mr. Hardy Lane. His son, Mr. THOMAS STINSON, we will notice in another place.

SAMUEL STINSON[edit]

settled upon the lot adjoining that of his father, and his birth took place not far from the year 1758. He enlisted in the military service during the war of the Revolution. It has been said of him that when at one time he was placed as a sentry he was ordered, if he heard or saw anything that was suspicious, to challenge by saying, "Who goes there? " three times, and if no answer was made to fire, and while on duty one night he had occasion to challenge, and, instead of saying it three different times, he said, "Who goes there three times?" and upon receiving no answer fired. After his term of service had expired he returned home, married Miss Hannah Babbidge, and settled upon the lot he occupied till his death, which took place not far from the year 1847. He was an upright and reliable man, and for fifty years a church member. His sons were: James, Thomas, Samuel, Aaron, and Simon. All, with the' exception of Thomas, remained here. His daughters were the wives of Mr. George Freeze, of Ellsworth, of Mr. Solomon Crockett, of Prospect, and Mr. Josiah Barbour, of this town.

WILLIAM STINSON[edit]

took up a lot of land lying south of that of his brother Samuel, and occupied it till his death, in 1848, or about that time. His first wife was a Miss York, by whom he had his family, and after her death he married a Miss Polly Calef, and after her death he married the widow of Mr. William Webb. He was one of the deacons of the Congregational Church for many years, and when I first came here he, with his colleague, Deacon . Closson, used to occupy the deacon's seat, as it was called, in front of, and below, the high, old-fashioned pulpit in the meeting-house, which was burnt down, which stood on the spot now occupied by the present one. He was a man of dignified appearance, and had a good share of what is called "commonsense," the most valuable of all kinds of sense. He represented the town in 1825 in the Legislature at Portland, and through all his long life was much respected. The men of those days were more rigid than men are now in doctrinal matters, but as a general thing ~hey were as much so in their integrity. The sons of Mr. Stinson were the late Benjamin Stinson, Esq., of Swan's Island, and the present Mr. William Stinson. The daughters were the former wife of Mr. Josiah Barbour; of the late Captain

John Toothaker; of Mr. John Buckminster, afterward that of Mr. Moses S. Finney; of Captain Jeremiah Hooper, of North Haven; of Mr. Solomon York, of Brooklin, and of Mr. Seth Whitmore, of Trenton. The real estate of Mr. Stinson is now owned and occupied by Mr. Johnson Billings.

JOHN STINSON[edit]

was the youngest son, and his wife was Miss Isabel Dyer, of Castine, now Brooksville, on Cape Rozier. After her death he married the widow of Mr. Thomas Trundy. He lived on his father's farm until about thirty years ago, when it was sold to Mr. Lane, the present occupant. Mr. Stinson died in Rockland, where he removed after the sale of the place. He was a man of good reputation, and was more communicative than either of his brothers, who were rather taciturn, particularly Mr. William Stinson. He was for many years a church member and took much interest in that direction. His sons were] ohn, Thomas, David, and George W., all of whom removed from this town. The daughters were the wives of Messrs. James and Ebenezer Joyce and Alexander Staples, all of Swan's Island. Mrs. Staples afterward became the wife of Mr. Joseph Small. By his second marriage he had a son, now living near Boston, and at the time of his birth his father was about seventy-six years of age.

THOMAS CONARY[edit]

was the first settler of what is known as Black Island, lying in the Reach, or, as it is sometimes called, Canary's Island, and, as before stated, was included within the limits of the town by the act of the Legislature of 1868. As has been understood, Mr. Conary was a native of Ireland. He was a very witty person, and in former years I used to hear of many of his witty and comical expressions. His first wife was the daughter of the ancestor of the Limeburner family, now living in Brooksville, by adoption. Mr. Limeburner emigrated from Scotland before the Revolutionary War, and with him came, besides his own family, two children, a son and a daughter adopted by him. The son was Cunningham Limeburner, who died at an advanced age, not far from 1825, in Brooksville, and the daughter, Mrs. Conary, was, I believe, a sister by birth to him. After her death he married a daughter of Mercy Staples, and a sister of Messrs. Joshua and Moses Staples, and by both marriages had ten sons, one of whom made this town his permanent residence - Mr. Thomas Conary, Jr., who died at an advanced age. His other sons settled in towns in this vicinity, and all of the name in this and other towns near us are the descendants of Mr. Conary, Sr. He had three daughters of whom I have had knowledge. One was the wife of Mr. Robinson Crockett, Jr., who l~ved in this town many years, afterward removing to Brooksville, where he died; another was the wife of Mr. Ebenezer Marks, of Brooksville; another of the late Mr. Amaziah Roberts, of Sedgwick.

BENJAMIN YORK[edit]

was the person who settled the island now in the limits of the town, known as White, or York's, Island, in the Reach. There is another island known as York's Island lying easterly of, and near, Isle au Haut, and within the limits of that town. About Captain York, as he was called, but little is known by us, or whence he came. A son of his was the father of the late Mr. Rufus York, who was drowned in Crockett's Cove, in the spring of 1844. He was on board a vessel loaded with wood to be carried to Rockland, 'Yhich took fire fronl the funnel above the fireplace in the night, and when discovered the deck load was on fire, 'and the flames swept everything on

the deck. With him were his' son Samuel S. York and Mr. Benjamin Cole. His son was the first who discovered the fire and first on deck. He was delayed in helping his father up the gangway and was· badly burned, as were they all. Mr. York was lame, and when they jumped overboard to swim on shore, which was but a short distance from the vessel, Mr. York became chilled and sank, and the other two gained the shore.' Samuel was unable to walk, but as his father's house was near, crept to it and went in, but lived but a day or two. Mr. Cole was not so badly injured as to be unable to walk, and helped Samuel to reach his house, but his injuries were so severe as to impair his health so that he lived but two or three years. The body of Mr. York was found and buried a few days after the occurrence. Another brother of the family was Mr. Benjamin York, who left town nearly fifty years ago. One of the sisters was the wife of Mr. Richard Crockett, the mother of the present Captain Levi B. Crockett; another was the wife of Mr. Ephraim Crockett, a brother to her sister's husband. Captain York, the subject of this notice, had other sons, whose descendants reside at N askeag Point, in the town of Brooklin, and all of the name in this vicinity are descendants of his. A daughter of him was the wife of Deacon William Stinson, before noticed, but of his family little is known. Captain York, for his last wife, nlarried the widow of a Mr. Richardson, . of Falmouth, Maine, who was the father of Captain Asa Richardson, now living here at the age of eighty-four years. She must have been much younger than her last husband.

THOMAS ROBBINS; 2d,[edit]

was the settler upon the point of Greenlaw's Neck, from which the bar runs to Stinson's Neck. He .was the son of another person of the same naI)1e, who will be noticed; and in the notice of Thomas Stinson, Esq., his wife and children are there named. Of him but little is known, and but one of his sons remained here - Mr. William G. Robbins, who sold his property to the present occupant, Mr. William Smith, not long after 1860, and removed to the town of Addison, Maine, where he died. Another brother, Mr. James Robbins, removed East when a young man, and of him nothing is known.

THOMAS WARREN[edit]

settled on what is known as Warren's, or Freeze's, Island, now owned and occupied by the widow of Mr. Billings P. Hardy. It appears, from what information that we have had, that he claimed a "settler's right," but that it was disputed on the ground, doubtless, that he had not made a settlement in season to be entitled to one. His wife was the daughter of Mr. George Freeze, and by her he had three children: one was the late Hon. Richard Warren, well known to us all, who died in 1865, at the age of seventy-nine. He represented the town in the Legislature in 1823 and in 1835 ; he was State Senator in 1844 and 1845 ; was several times one of the selectmen, and was for many years engaged in trade and in the fishing business. His wife, a most excellent woman, died in 1861, much lamented. She was the dau~hter of Mr. Samuel Trundy, Sr. Another brother was William Warren, who died when a young man; a sister, Mary Warren, the wife of a Mr. Spencer, who lived in one of the towns on Penobscot River, above Bangor. Mr. Thomas Warren was drowned by falli ng out of a log canoe, and after his death his widow married Mr. William Ring, who occupied the island on which Mr. Warren settled and the land nearest to it, on Greenlaw's Neck, which is still known as "Ring Town," now owned by the heirs of the late Pearl Spofford, Esq. Mr. Ring afterward removed to the town of Ellsworth, where both he and his wife died.

ELIJAH TOOTHAKER[edit]

settled on the lot still known as the "Toothaker Place," and he was one of those known as "young settlers," and the lot was surveyed to him as appears by Peters's plan] made in 1798. Where he came from I never knew, but he had a brother who lived in the town of Phillips, in Franklin County, named John Toothaker, whose descendants now live there; and another by the name of Joseph, who lived for some time on Swan's Island. The wife of Mr. Toothaker was named Elizabeth Daggett. He was drowned not far from 1810, while coming from the main land, accidently falling. overboard. His oldest son, the late Captain John Toothaker, was with him, aged about sixteen years, and came home with the boat. Mr. Toothaker left four sons: John, for many years a master-mariner, dying in 1841, aged forty-eight years; Elijah, who was lost at sea, being knocked overboard by the main boom of the schooner Charles of Castine; Ebenezer, who lived in the town of Holden, at"" Gilmore's Corner, a blacksmith by trade, and Captain Thomas D. Toothaker, who removed to Belfast and was lost at sea. The daughters were the wives of Mr. Isaac Harding, of Sedgwick; Mr. Benjamin Smith, of Swan's Island; Mr. William G. Robbins, of this town, and a Mr. Full, who resided in some town near Bangor. After the death of Mr. Toothaker, his widow married Captain Belcher Tyler. She was five times a widow. Her third husband was Mr. Thomas Stinson, 2d; the fourth was Mr. Samuel Jordan, of Sedgwick; the fifth was Mr. Dominicus Carman, of this town, having as many husbands as the woman of Samaria.

WILLIAM GREENLAW[edit]

was the first settler near what is called" Fish Creek." He was the son of Mr. Jonathan Greenlaw, mentioned before, who went with the British to New Brunswick in 1783. As before stated, the subject of this sketch returned with his brother Richard. The wife of Mr. Greenlaw was Miss Rebecca Babbidge, a daughter of Mr. William Babbidge; and at the time of their marriage there was no person qualified to solemnize marriages nearer than Bagaduce, where the chaplain to the garrison officiated. The person who performed the duties of chaplain, as well as surgeon, was Dr. John Calef, a refugee from Massachusetts, in which State he was born, in Ipswich; and when the troops evacuated the place, he went with them into the Province of New Brunswick, where he lived the remainder of his days. Mr. Greenlaw was married in 1780, and he and Mr. Joseph Whitmore, with their intended wives, who were sisters, went there for the purpose, and they were both joined in marriage on the same day. Mr. Greenlaw and wife were the parents of ten sons and one daughter, who lived to manhood and womanhood. The eldest of the sons was William, who was lost at sea on a whaling voyage, when a young man. The second son was the late Captain John Greenlaw, who was a capable and intelligent master-mariner, who died in 1870, at the age of eighty-seven years, after having lived with his wife in wedlock sixty-six years. He was the father of the present Captain Jeremiah H., Ebenezer, and William Greenlaw. Another son was Mr. James Greenlaw, who was drowned not far from 1830, leaving a family. Ariother was Captain Jonathan Greenlaw, who renloved to Eastport, out' of which place he sailed many years. Another was the late Captain Richard, Greenlaw, the father of the present Mr. Thomas R. Greenlaw. Another was Thomas Greenlaw, 'who was drowned when

a young man. Another was Mr. Ebenezer Greenlaw, the father of the present Mr. Eben Greenlaw, 2d. Another was the late Captain Walter Greenlaw, well known in his day, who died at sea in about the year 1847. Another is the present Levi Greenlaw, the sole survivor, at the age of seventy-nine years in 1882. And the other was the late Mr. William Greenlaw. The daughter was the wife of Mr. Daniel G. Copp, who removed from this place to Castine, who was by trade a ship carpenter and joiner, and from Castine he removed to the city of Ellsworth, where he died. About this family there was one singularity; of the ten sons there were five who could use no food or drink in which there was anything sweet, operating upon them as an emetic; while upon the remaining five it had no such effect. Mr. Greenlaw was one of whom everyone who knew him spoke in praise, as a quiet, honest, and upright man. The land occupied by hiIn was not a part of that taken up by his father and uncles, as that passed into other hands; but as he was here so early, he was entitled to a settler's right, and the place is still the property of his descendants.

NATHANIEL SCOTT[edit]

was the person who purchased the settler's right of Major William Eaton, and, as I have understood, Mr. Eaton left the place while the British had possession of Bagaduce, in order that he might escape the necessity of taking the oath of allegiance or neutrality. He went to the town of York, the place from which he came here, and after peace was proclaimed returned, and it was probably not many years after that he sold his right to Mr. Scott, who came here with a family. His son, John Scott, was married before he came, as was his daughter Martha to Mr. Asa Green. There was a son of the name of William Scott, who purchased the lot at the Northwest Harbor, on which the house known as the "Green House" now stands, and erected a house upon it. It has since been much enlarged, and is now a large and elegant house. The house that was standing fifty years ago was built by William S~ott, after which he died, and Mr. Green and wife came here from Worcester County, Massachusetts, and occupied it till their death. Ignatius Haskell, Esq., had a claim upon it which he sold to Mr. Asa Green, and afterward it was transferred to his son, the late William S. Green. The time of Mr. Green's removal I do not know exactly, but it was prior to 1800, as the land was sold to William Scott previous to Peters's survey, and not long after his purchase he died. 1\lr. Nathaniel Scott died not long after 1790, and Mr. John Scott occupied the farm till his death, which took place not far from 1830• Mr. John Scott and wife were the parents of eight sons and three daughters. The sons were: John, who died a young man; James, who died a young man also; Clark, about whom I never knew anything; Enos, who, with his brother Eben, removed to Lubec; William, who resided in Boston some years ago; the present Mr. Levi Scott and the late Mr. Leonard Scott. The daughters were the wives of Mr. Joseph Clifton and Captain Enoch P. Hazen, and one, Lucinda, died unmarried. The estate is now occupied by the widow of Mr. Leonard Scott, and by Captain William Torrey, John Weed, and WillialTI P. Scott. Whether Mr. William Scott is still living is not to us known. Mrs. Hazen, with her husband, removed to Brooklin, where he died, and after his death she went to reside with one of her daughters in Massachusetts. Mrs. Clifton lived to be very aged, leaving three daughters: one, the wife of Captain Willia,m Torrey; another the wife of Mr. Thomas Lowe, and another married, living in Massachusetts.

ASA GREEN[edit]

the son-in-law of Mr. Nathaniel Scott, died in 1838, aged over eighty years, and his wife survived him. He was for many years elected constable, and was in former years a deputy sheriff. He was elected in 1819, with Ignatius Haskell, Esq., a delegate to frame ·the Constitution of the State. Their children were John, a master-mariner, who was, with his brother Asa Green, Frederick Spofford, Esq., Abner Babbidge, and Amos Angell, a son of Dr. David Angell, wrecked on the Green Islands in February, 1818, in the schooner Shakespeare, returning from Boston, and all perished. Another son was the late Captain William S. Green, who was well known to us for many years. He was in 1842, 1859, and in 1863, a representative to the State Legislature, and died in 1870 at the age of sixty-five years, leaving a widow who is still living (1882) ; three sons: Martin, now dead, Thomas B., and John W., and a daughter, Mrs. Kettletas. Another son of Mr. Asa Green was Thomas Green, the father of the present Mr. Asa Green. The daughters of the family were Frances, the wife of Mr. Joseph Small; Mary, the wife of Mr. Thomas Haskell, and afterward the wife of Mr. Thomas Dow, Jr.; another was Roxanna, the wife of Captain Francis Haskell, who was lost in the schooner Commodore Perry (on board of which was his son and sonin-law),' on Long Ledge, off Mount Desert, November 26, ,1845; and another daughter was first the wife of John R. Haskell, and mother of the present Captain Sylvanus G. - Haskell, and afterward the wife of Moses C. Angell, who removed to Boston, where he died a few years ago, and where his widow still resides. The property of Captain William S. Green was, after his death, occupied by

Martin V. B. Green, and is now by Mrs. Kettletas, with whom her mother resides.

PETER HARDY[edit]

was the settler upon the lot adjoining that of William Eaton, on the southwest." ·He was a native of the county of Worcester, Massachusetts. His wife was a daughter of Deacon Francis Haskell, but whether they were married here or before they came here is to me unknown. His son Peter Hardy, the eldest of the family, was born in February, 1770, and it is probable that the marriage was before they came here, as his fatherin-law did not come till 1770, according to the best information that we have. The land he settled upon was the place of the occupancy of Michael Carney, but Carney had gone before Mr. Hardy came. He was for several years a coroner, and both he and his wife died upon the same day, in 1831, and were buried in one grave, having lived together in wedlock over sixty years. There have been but three other instances that have come to my knowledge where both husband and wife occupied the same grave. One was in 1826, of Mr. Jeremiah Pressey and wife; another in 1832-33, of Mr. James Babbidge and wife, who were drowned in attempting to pass through the flood-gates at Holt's milldam, and the other was that of Captain Joseph Raynes and wife, in 1859: Mr. Hardy and wife were the parents of three sons: the late Captain Peter Hardy, who died in 1863 at the age of ninety-three years; Mr. Jonathan Hardy, who lived and died upon Little Deer Island, and another named Silas, who, when a young man, was lost at sea. The daughters of the family were the wives of a Mr. Wooster, and she was the mother of five children at two births, and the last was but thirteen months after the first. Another daughter was the wife of Mr. Adan1s, in Massachusetts. Another was the wife of Captain Jonathan Haskell, 2d, and another that of Captain Jonathan Haskell, 3d, who was known as " Long Metre," as he was a very tall man; and the youngest was the wife of Mr. Oliver Lane, Jr. Captain Jonathan Haskell, 2d, died in 1873, aged ninety-four years, and Mr. Lane was the father of the present Mr. Hardy Lane.

Captain Peter Hardy, Jr.' s wife was Miss Sarah Campbell, daughter of Mr. John Campbell. They had the following-named sons: Peter, who lived and died on· Little Deer Island, in 1859, aged sixty-one years;' Silas~ who formerly traded on Swan's Island. He was a mastermariner, and died in Australia a number of years ago. ] ohn, who lived' in Newburyport, and is now dead. Francis, who formerly was a master-mariner, but who now resides in Massachusetts. George' C. Hardy, a wellknown citizen, 'Yho has been one of the selectmen in former years, and who owns and occupies the farm occupied by his grandfather; and another, now dead. There was one daughter, now the widow of Mr. John Thompson. Captain Hardy was for many years a master-mariner. He was a man of enterprise and accumulated quite a property for those days; was a member of the Legislature in 1834 and in 1839, and was for some years one of the selectmen.

The family of Mr. Jonathan Hardy, whose wife was a Miss Putnam, of Newburyport, was Silas L., who lived and died on Little Deer Island not far from 186 I ; ] onathan, who lived there many years, and afterward removed to Winterport, where he died a few years ago; Joseph P., who moved to Winterport, where he was well known 'for several years, and afterward removed to the State of Illinois, where he is probably now living; Billings P.', who moved to Frankfort, and afterward returned here, purchased Freeze's Island, where he resided till his death. Another son was Captain Abijah W. Hardy, who resides in Winterport. The daughters were the wives of Major Nathan Low, Joshua Haskell, and Mr. Henry Harris.

JEREMIAH EATON[edit]

was the first settler upon the farm adjoining that of Mr. Hardy upon the southwest. ,He was the son of Major William Eaton, and his wife was a daughter of Captain Mark and a sister of Ignatius Haskell, Esq. She survived him, and her second marriage was with Mr. John Howard, who will be noticed. She had no children, and Mr. Eaton adopted two brothers, the children of Eleanor Bray, afterward the wife of Mr. Perry and the mother of the present Mr. Eli Perry. The children took his name, and were known as Mr. Asa B. Eaton and Edward Eaton. He bequeathed his property after his wife's decease to them, but they did not receive it. It became the property of Ignatius Haskell, Esq., and afterward that of Thomas Adams, Esq., of Castine, by whom it was sold to the late Captain Amos Howard, and it is now occupied by his widow. Asa B. Eaton, one of the adopted sons, married Miss Mercy Raynes, daughter of William and sister of the late Captain Johnson Raynes. Three of their children only lived to grow up. One, the present Captain William R. Eaton, who resided for many years here, and in 1867 removed to Wakefield, Massachusetts, and now resides in Newburyport. He has been for many years an enterprising master-mariner. Another brother was the late Mr. Nathan H. Eaton, and a sister now dead was the wife of a Mr. Dexter, in Boston. Mr. Eaton died at sea in 185 I, and his wife survived him not many years. The other brother, Mr. Edward Eaton, married a daughter of' Mr. Chase Pressey, by whom he had one son, Hiram Eaton, who went from here about forty years ago, and two daughters, one of whom married in Boston, and both are now dead. Both Edward Eaton and his wife died more than fifty years ago.

JOHN HOWARD[edit]

was the settler upon the lot southwesterly of that of Mr. Jeremiah Eaton, though not adjoining, as the land now occupied by Mr. Albion K. Haskell lies between, which was first purchased by Mr. John Scott, Jr., and afterward by the late Captain Ignatius :ijaskelI, Jr. Mr. Howard was three times married. His first wife was a daughter of Mr. John Pressey, ] i., and their children were John, Joshua C., Michael, Thomas, and Amos Howard, none of whom is now living. His daughters by his first wife were the wives of Captain William Eaton, the son of William Eaton,2d, and was afterward the wife of Mr. Nathaniel Ingalls; the others were the wives of the late Mr. Samuel H. Foster, Pepperell Tyler, and Andrew Tyler, and all, with the exception of the present widow of the last named, are now dead. Mrs. Foster died the present year, 1881, nearly eighty-nine years of age. Mr. Howard for his second wife married the widow of Mr. Jeremiah Eaton, and after her death married Mrs. Mary C. Small, of Newburyport, Massachusetts, who was many years younger than himself, and by her had one daughter, Mary A., who was the wife of Captain Edmund S. Raynes, of this town, now residing in Newburyport. She is now dead. Mr. John Howard, Jr. married first a daughter of Mr. Thomas Thompson, and by her had one son, Captain Thomas Howard, now a resident of Newburyport. After her death he married Susan, the daughter of Mr. William Foster, by whom he had six sons and two daughters. One of the sons only remained here, the late Mr. Stephen K. Howard. Three, William, Charles, and John, died when young men. Oliver now resides in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and the place of residence of the other, Darius, is to us unknown. Of the daughters, one was the wife of Mr. Rufus H. Moulton, a master ship-carpenter, who lived for many years in Brooklin, and afterward removed to Massachusetts; the other was the wife of a Mr. Pettingill, in Newburyport. Captain Joshua C. Howard, the second son, married Lydia, the daughter of J 0seph Tyler, Esq., by whom he had two sons, one of whom was drowned when a child. The other, Mr. Joseph T. Howard, lived in Newburyport, where he died not many years ago. The daughters were the wives of Mr. Michael H. Pressey, of this town; a Mr. Short, in Newburyport; and the youngest was the wife of Captain John J. RayneS, now of Hyde Park, Massachusetts.' Captain Howard was very skilful as a pilot, and served in that capacity on board one of the first steamers that navigated the waters in this vicinity, in 1827, and afterward was pilot of the revenue-boat Veto at Castine, and came to his death by the effects of arsenic. While serving on board the Veto, a revenue-cutter whose duty was inspection, he went to Castine and procured the services of Captain Howard as pilot to Bangor. Her captain being a harsh man, a conspiracy was formed by the cook and others to poison him, and while at Bangor arsenic was procured, with which the captain and those who sat at the table with him were poisoned. The dose was so large that it operated speedily; death did not immediately take place, but all died not long after. Captain Howard survived thenl all, living' some six months after the occurrence, which took place in the year 1832. The next brother, Michael Howard, married a daughter of Mr. Chase Pressey, and they are now dead. They occupied the house near that of Mr. Samuel Pickering, and of the family but two remain: Charles, who went into Massachusetts, and a daughter who now occupies the house of her father. The other brothers, Messrs. Thomas and Amos Howard, died but few years ago, and were well known to us here.

WILLIAM EATON, 2d[edit]

settled the lot adjoining that of Mr. Howard on the southwest, and his wife was a daughter of Deacon Francis Haskell. Their sons were William, Jeremiah, and Samuel, all now dead. The daughters were the wives of Dr. Moody Powers; Mr. Amasa Holden, who came from Mendon, Massachusetts, and was for many years a schoolteacher; a Mr. Knight, of Newburyport; Mr: John Short, of the same place, who removed from here to Castine, and afterward to Bangor, where he died; Captain Ignatius Haskell, Jr. Another was first the wife of Mr. Avery Small, a nd after that of Mr. William Greenlaw; and one, Esther, died unmarried. They all, with the exception of Mrs. Greenlaw, are now dead. The farm of Mr. Eaton is now owned by two of his grandsons, Mr. William E. Powers and Mr. Francis M. Holden. The wife of Mr. Eaton died in 1836, and he died not far from the year 1841. Captain Willianl Eaton, Jr., his son, married Abigail Howard, the daughter of Mr., ] ohn Howard. Their son, the present William Eaton, is a pilot in the revenue-service, and resides in Portland. The daughters were the wives of Captain Daniel S. Torrey, Mr. William Low, Captain Francis H. Torrey, and Mr. John Weed, two of whom, the Mrs. Torreys, are living. Captain Eaton was iost in the latter part of the year 1830, on board the sloop HU1ztress of Castine, Captain John Greenlaw, Jr. He acted as pilot on a trip from that place to New York, and on their return was lost. Besides the two above named there were on board Mr. William Buckminster and ] oseph conary, who acted as cook. Mr. Jeremiah Eaton, the next brother, married arid lived near the bar on Little Deer Island. He was drowned in 1834, leaving a widow and family, of whom but three are now living. The other brother, Samuel Eaton, was lost at sea when a young man.

ABIJAH HASKELL,[edit]

a son of Deacon Francis Haskell, settled the lot adjoining that of Mr. Eaton on the southwest, and his wife was a daughter of Mr. Benjamin Cole, Sr. Their sons were Jonathan Haskell, 2d, Abijah, Francis, and Joshua Haskell. One of the daughters was first the wife of Captain Benjamin S. Haskell, who was lost in the schooner L'ingzt1z, about 1822. She afterward became the wife of Doctor Abiel Reed, by whom she had one son, the present Captain William H. Reed, now residing in Portland, and a daughter, who was the wife of Mr. Levi Marshall, Jr. Another was the wife of Mr. Ezekiel Marshall, and another that of Mr. Thonlas Dow. Captain Jonathan Haskell, 2d, married a daughter of Mr. Peter Hardy, by whom he had two daughters: one the widow of the late Edward Y. Haskell, and the mother of the present Captain Caleb W., George D., Albert L., and Edwin L. Haskell; the other is the widow of the late Captain Dudley Thompson. Captain Haskell died in 1873, aged ninetyfour years. Mr. Abijah Haskell, the next eldest brother, married a sister of Mrs. Jonathan Haskell; he lived on Little Deer Island, where he died at the age of ninety-one years. His wife survived him not long, and they lived together in wedlock sixty-five years. Captain Francis Haskell, the next brother, was lost, as has been stated, ,in 1845, on board the schooner Commodore Perry. Joshua, the youngest, died about two years ago. The estate of Mr. Abijah Haskell is still owned and occupied by his descendants.

NATHAN HASKELL, ESQ.[edit]

settled the lot lying southwesterly of the land of Mr. Abijah Haskell, though not adjoining it, and he came here, I judge, prior to 1784, or about that year. He first married a daughter of Captain Mark Haskell, by whom he had one daughter, who became the wife of Rev. Wigglesworth Dale. After her death he married Miss Lucy Torrey, daughter of Mr. Jonathan Torrey. She was the mother of the late Mr. Edward 'Y. Haskell, and of the wife of Mr. Peter Powers, and the mother of Nathan H. Powers, now of Orland. He died, leaving a widow, who survived him several years. He was a man of intePigence, was for many years a justice of the peace, and filled offices in the town, and was also a deacon in the Congregational Church. His real estate was, after his death, owned and occupied by his son, and now by his widow.

CALEB HASKELL[edit]

a brother of Nathan Haskell, occupied the lot adjoining that of the last-named on the southwest. His wife was not a native of this town, and none of his family after his death remained here, except a daughter, who was the first wife of Mr. Jesse Niles, a carpenter, who came not long after 1800, from New Hampshire, who occupied the farnl for many years. I t was sold about in the year 1840, and is now owned and occupied by Mr. William H. Thompson. None of the family of Mr. Niles by his first wife is now living, but after her death, which took place in 1835, he married a daughter of Mr. Naylor Small, by whom he had a family.

NATHAN DOW[edit]

settled on the lot of land adjoining that of Mr. Caleb Haskell on the southwest, and a part of, his farm bordered upon the Northwest Harbor, and embraced what is now known as Dow's Point, on the northeast side of the entrance to the harbor. He was the second person who permanently settled in that part of the island, Mr. John Pressey having taken up a lot on the southwest side ,of the entrance, opposite the land occupied by Mr. Dow.

He came in the fall of 1767, and, I presume, came from the town of Brunswick, Maine, or that vicinity, as he was a neighbor of Mr. Theophilus Eaton, who came here from that place, then better known as New Meadows River, ,which runs up into that town. He died here, leaving two sons, John and Nathan Dow, and two daughters, who were married. The elder, Diana, was the wife of Mr. Jonathan ,Eaton, who will be noticed, and who came with Mr. Dow. The other was the wife of Mr. Josiah Crockett, who was well known here in his tinle. Mr. John Dow, his son, ,married a daughter of Mr. Thomas Saunders, and was the ,father of the late Mr. Thomas Dow; Mr. Stephen Dow, who was drowned over fifty years ago; Mr. Samuel Dow, who settled on Mount Desert Island; Ephraim Dow, who removed there about forty years ago; and Mr. William T. Dow, who removed from here to Tinker's Island. The daughters were the wives of Mr. William Staples, a son of a man of the same name who 'was said to have been :impressed on board a British ship-of-war during the Revolution. Another was the wife of the late Joseph C. Stinson, Esq.; another married Captain John Kempton, of Isle au Haut, and another Captain Jacob Carlton, Who for many years resided in the same place, and afterward removed to Winterport, where he died. Captain Carlton represented this town in the Legislature in 1838. Of Nathan Dow, 2d, I knew but little. He left three sons: one, the present Mr. Nathan Dow, who is now (188 I) aged eighty-nine years; Joshua and Ephraim Dow, who have been dead some years. The land of Mr. Nathan Dow was mostly occupied by his son Nathan after his decease, and after the decease of his son his three sons above named came into possession, but a part of it is now owned by the heirs of the late Martin V. B. Green, and the residue by the descendants of the original owner.

THEOPHILUS EATON[edit]

settled upon the lot of land adjoining that of Mr. Dow on the southeast, and bordered by the waters of the Northwest Harbor. He was a cousin of Major William Eaton, the first permanent settler, and was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, in the year 1720, and came here in 1768. From Haverhill he removed to the town of Sandown, N ew H~mpshire, and from that place to Brunswick, and from the latter place here. The occasion of his coming was this: A daughter of his, Judith Eaton, married Mr. Edward Howard, who afterward lived and died in Brooksville. Mr. Howard came here and comInenced a settlement. His wife was taken sick, and he went to Brunswick to bring her mother here to take care of her daughter during her sickness. Mrs. Howard died, and after that Mr. Eaton came here in a boat to take his wife home.' This was in 1767. Mr. Howard, after the death of his wife, gave his mother-in-law all his rights to land here, as a compensation for her services. Mr. Eaton was pleased with the location, and the next spring, 1768; moved with' his family, where he remained till his death in 1793. The wife of Mr. Eaton was Miss Abigail Fellows, who died in 1824, aged one hundred and two years and eight months, at the residence of her son, James Eaton, in the town of Prospect. His sons were: Moses, who lived on what is now· the place occupied as a village, in the town of Sedgwick; Jonathan, whom we have noticed as making his escape when arrested to be carried to Bagaduce; Ebenezer, who was for many years a minister of the gospel on the island of Mount Desert; and James, who occupied his father's place after his death, and to whom the lot was laid out on Peters's plan, who afterward sold to Captain Jonathan Haskell. The daughters who survived him were, one, the wife of Mr. Harding, in Sedgwick; another was the wife of Mr. Solomon Billings, who lived on the northwest side· of what is known as Walker's Pond, in Brooksville; and another was the wife of Captain John Raynes, of this place. She died in 1850, at the age of ninety-one years. Mr. Eaton was one of the earlier selectmen of the town, and was a man much respected.. The farm occupied by Mr. Eaton was afterward in part occupied by the late Captain John Torrey, and a part of his possession is the property of .his adopted daughter, the widow of the late Mr. Joshua Pressey, 2d.

LEVI CARMAN[edit]

was the person who settled on the lot lying on the southeast of that of Mr. Eaton. He came, as appears by the best information now to be had, in, or about, the year 1768, but from what place is not known. He was a master-mariner and was engaged in the coasting trade. From the fact that he was chosen one of the committee to obtain a grant of the lands remaining on the island, after the settlers had had their lots assigned them', it must have been that he was a man of intelligence and character. The time of his death was before 1798, as on Peters's plan the lot he occupied, containing two hundred acres, was assigned to the "Widow Carman;" but of him but little has been learned. His widow died in 1835, aged ninety-one years. Their children were: Mr. Dominicus Carman, who lived near what is known as Carman's Rock, a large granite bowlder by the ~ide of the highway leading to the steamboat-landing, about one mile from the Northwest Harbor. He was considered a skilful doctor 6f cattle, to which he paid considerable attention.

Another brother was Mr. John Carman, who died many years ago. One of the daughters was the wife of Captain Francis Marshall and mother of the late Levi Marshall, and the other, that of Mr. Naylor Small. The wife of Mr. Dominicus Carman was a daughter of Mr. Ezra Howard, who will be noticed. They had one son who lived to manhood, the late Mr. Thomas Carman, the father of Michael P., Edwin, and Abner P. Carman. One of the daughters married Mr.' Samuel Saund~rs; one married Mr. James Jarvis; another married Mr. Francis Haskell; and there was another who went from here many years ago. After the death of his wife, he married Mrs. Elizabeth Jordan, the lady before noticed, who was five times a widow. He was born in 1766 and died not far from 1850.

The wife of Mr. John Carman was a Miss Choate, a sister of Mr. George G. Choate, who was a native of Essex County, Massachusetts, who lived here many years and is well remembered by the older people among us for his wit. He removed to Bluehill, where he died. Mr. John Carman and wife were the parents of three sons and six daughters. The sons were the present Mr. Levi Carman and Mr. Frederick Carman, and John Carman, who died when a young man. The daughters were the wives of Mr. John Ferguson, who, at the time of his marriage, lived in Massachusetts; of the late Mr. Solomon Haskell, of this town; of the late Jonathan E. Webb., Esq.; of Mr. James Clough, of Bluehill; of Dr. Charles N. Briggs, a dentist, a native of Rhode Island; and of a Mr. Trowbridge; with one or two exceptions they are now dead. The widow of Mr. Carman married Mr. Jeremiah Stover, who came here from Penobscot, whom she survived, and died not far from 1852, at an advanced age. The land occupied by Mr. Levi Carman is still mostly occupied by his descendants; that of Dominicus Cannan, by his grandson, Mr. Tristram Haskell, to whom descended his grandfather's ski.ll as a cattle-doctor.

MARK HASKELL[edit]

was the first settler who occupied the lot adjoining that of Mr. Carman on the southeast. He came when quite advanced in years, not far from the year 1768, from w~at was then known as Sandy Bay, in the town of Rockport, Massachusetts, and some of his sons came at the same time and occ"lpied the, premises with him. He was the father of Captain Mark and Deacon Francis Haskell, who afterward came. He resided here several years, but prior to his death he made a contract with Ignatius Haskell, Esq., his grandson, for his support, and in consideration conveyed to him his right as a settler. Not long after he went on a visit to his friends in Massachusetts, where he died; and his right, by virtue of his own and some of his son's occupancy, became, upon a division of the land, the property of his grandson, by whom it was owned at the time of his death. The lot contained two hundred and fifty acres, running about two miles, in a northeast direction, from the Northwest Harbor, and a 'part of it is known as the" Rye Field" lot.

FRANCIS HASKELL[edit]

a son of the person before named, was the settler upon the land adjoining on the southeast. He came from Newburyport in 1770 with his family, and but few of his children were born after he came here. When the church was organized, in 1773, he was one of the deacons. The time of his death is unknown to us, but it was prior to the survey of the island, as his lot was assigned to his two sons, Jonathan and Tristram Haskell (two hundred acres). He left four sons, namely: Francis, who removed to South Thomaston and lived on what is known as Ash Point, and died there not far from 1841, over ninety years of age; Jonathan, who lived here till his death; Abijah, before noticed; and Tristram. Of the daughters, one was the wife of Mr. Peter Hardy, Sr.; one, of Mr. William Eaton, 2d; another married Captain Ephraim Marshall; another was the wife of Deacon Joshua Haskell; another, of Mr. Prescott Powers, and the other, that of Captain Francis Marshall. His land was owned and occupied by his two sons during their lives, and IS now chiefly owned by their descendants.

EZEKIEL MARSHALL[edit]

was the settler upon the lot of land adjoining that of Mr. Francis Haskell on the southeast. He came about the year 1768. He was a connection of the Haskell family, as I have understood, by marriage. There appears to have been an Ephraim M:arshall, also, who came about the same time (probably a brother), who did not remain; and as Mr. Ephraim had a two-hundred-acre lot, it is probable that one hundred acres was, by virtue of the right of Ephraim, probably assigned to him. His lot took in what has since become the most valuable land in that vicinity; and in 1772 he sold Mark ,Haskell, 2d, and his sons, Ignatius and Solomon, what has been since known as Haskell's Point, on which the stores stand at the Northwest Harbor, and which remained the property of Ignatius Haskell till his death. This sale was seventeen years prior to the allotment of the land in the town by the Tylers, and till that time no individual had a title. The purchase was some years before Messrs. Mark Haskell & Sons removed here and commenced business. Mr. Marshall must have died prior to the survey, as the lot is described as belonging to the "Heirs of Ezekiel Marshall." His sons were Ephraim, Solomon, Joshua, and Francis; and one of the daughters was the wife of Mr. Aaron S. Haskell.

JONATHAN HASKELL[edit]

the son of Francis, remained here till his death in 1830, at the age of seventy-five years. His wife was Miss Dorothy Shute, a daughter of the man of that name who settled upon Sandy Point, now in the town of Stockton. She survived him about twenty years, when his real estate was divided among his heirs.· Their children were Benjamin S., Jonathan, known as "Long Metre," Thomas, Francis, and David, and all are now dead. The daughters were the wives of Mr. Daniel Torrey, John Torrey, Levi Marshall, and Chase Pressey,and they are all dead also. Captain Haskell was for many years an enterprising master - mariner and accumulated considerable property. His sons also followed the sea for many years.

His son, the late Captain David Haskell, resided on, and occupied, his father's premises till the death of his mother, and after a division' of the property, retained the buildings and land around them till his death in 1878. They are now occupied by his son and youngest daughter.

TRISTRAM HASKELL[edit]

the youngest son of Francis Haskell, remained upon the lot he was entitled to, as heir of his father (which was assigned to him), till his death, which took place not far from the year 1860, when he was about ninety years of age. His first wife was Miss Martha Merchant, a daughter of Mr. Anthony Merchant, who settled Merchant's Island, in 1772, now within the limits of the town of Isle au Haut, by whom he had six sons and two daughters. The sons were: Francis, who was drowned in Boston Harbor, in 1838, the father of the present :J\1Iessrs. Tristram and Davis Haskell; Davis, who lived on the road leading from the Northwest Harbor to the steamboat -landing, about two miles from the harbor; Tristram, who lived on what is known as Beech Hill, about one mile from the harbor; Peter, who lived on Little Deer Isle; John R., the father of the present Captain Sylvanus G. Haskell; and Joshua P., who died in 1880, aged seventy-seven years. The last named was for some time in the British navy, and was present at the battle of N avarino, in 1824, in which a complete victory was obtained by the British fleet over the Turks, in the war which secured the independence of the Greeks. For many years he resided in Liverpool, England. Of the daughters, one was the wife of the late Mr. James Stinson; the other married in Massachusetts. His first wife died in 1803, and Captain Haskell married Miss Betsey Barton, by whom he had four sons and four daughters. The sons were the late Captain William Haskell, George W., and John, and one who died in childhood. The daughters were the wives of Captain Adam Thompson, Jr., Mr. Frederick S. Pressey, Mr. Frederick Eaton, and Mr. Edwin (unreadable). Of the above none of the first family is now living, and of the last, Captain John Haskell and the four sisters. After the death of his second wife in 1835 Captain Haskell married his third wife, a Mrs. Tuttle, a daughter of Mr. Benjamin Weed, and in ab9ut the year 1860 died, aged about ninety years. For many years he was a master-mariner, but, being troubled with deafness, was obliged to abandon the sea.

EPHRAIM MARSHALL[edit]

was the eldest of the sons of Mr. Ezekiel Marshall, who has been mentioned, and his wife was a daughter of Mr. Francis Haskell, by whom he had two sons, Ephraim and Ezekiel, and four daughters, and all are now dead. He lived on the southern side of the road leading toward the Reach, not far from the place occupied by the house - now burnt down - built and occupied by Captain David P. Marshall, who removed from this place a few years ago.. Another son' of the Marshall family was Joshua, the father of the present Mr. Ezekiel Marshall, the oldest man now among us, born in 1790. Another was Mr. Solomon Marshall, who lived on the southwest side of the Northwest Harbor, who left one son, Mark Marshall, and two daughters, Mrs~ Hanson and Mrs. Murray, all of whom are now dead. Captain Francis Marshall was the youngest son. His first wife was, as we have nlentidned, a daughter of Mr. Levi Carman, who lived with him but a few years. He afterward married Miss Abigail Haskell, the daughter of Deacon Francis Haskell, by whom he had two sons, Elias D. and the late Francis Marshall, who survived him, and three daughters, one of whom was the wife of Thomas Lanlson, Esq., of Boston. The present Hon. Edwin D. Lamson, of Richland, Maine, is a son of hers. Another daughter remained unmarried, Hannah, who lived here, and the other, Mrs. Joy; who resided in Boston. Of the family only one, Elias D. Marshall, is now living.

MARK HASKELL[edit]

the second of the name, came here with his family in 1778, having some six years before purchased the l~nd they occupied of Ezekiel Marshall. He was a native of what was then known as Sandy Bay, in the present town of Rockport, Massachusetts, but afterward removed to Newburyport, from which place he came here, and commenced business with his two sons, Ignatius and Solomon. He was born in 1723, and his wife was Miss Abigail Bray, a sister of the first man of the name who came here. They had quite a large family, some of whom died in childhood. The survivors were Ignatius, Solomon, Joshua, and Edward: and three daughters: one the wife of Mr. Jeremiah Eaton, another that of Nathan Haskell, Esq., both of whom have been noticed, - and another that of Mr. Elijah Dunham. They built a saw and grist mill, which was a great convenience to the inhabitants, and the sawmill of profit to the owners, as there were then logs in abundance to be' manufactured into lumber; they also built houses and a store. The saw and grist mills stood until about twentyfive years ag-o, and then were the property of John P. Johnson, Esq. Mr. Haskell took his two eldest sons, Ignatius and Solomon, into partnership, and the firm was known as "Messrs. Mark Haskell & Sons." They built several vessels. One was a ship of about four hundred tons, a large one for those days, besides brigs and schooners, and they accumulated, for the times, a large property, owning at one time more than one thousand acres of land. Solomon, the junior copartner, removed to Newburyport, and did business many years, in which his father and brother had an interest. After the death of their father, which took place in 1810, the copartnership was dissolved, and he (Solomon) remained there till his death in 1828, but had a considerable interest in the real estate here with his brother, and at the time of his death was a deacon in the church, of which the then well-known Rev. Mr. Milton was pastor.

IGNATIUS HASKELL, ESQ.[edit]

after the death of his father, did the business here, and for the times and locality it was quite extensive, in trading and building vessels, for several years. He was a man who had a large share of business capacity, and for a long time was the foremost man in the community, and had great influence, owning . a large property and taking great interest in the affairs of the town and church. He built a meeting-house not far from the year 1800 at his own expense, selling the pews to those who were disposed to purchase. He was one of the earliest justices of the peace here, was often one of the selectmen, and was in 18 19 a delegate to· Portland with Asa Green, before named, to the convention to frame the State Constitution. Till the time of his death in 1842, at the age of ninety-one years, he retained his faculties in a remarkable degree. His wife was Miss Mary Stickney, of Newburyport, by whom he had four sons and five daughters. The sons were Aaron S., Mark, Ignatius, Jr., and Solonl0n, all of whom are still well remembered. The daughters were the wives of Mr. John Foster, Dr. David Angell, Mr. Jonathan L. Stevens, of Castine, Hezekiah Rowell, Esq., who resided here many years, afterward removing to Castine and after some years returned; and the youngest was the wife of Dr. TheophiIus Doe, of Brewer. After the death of his wife, the subject of this sketch married the widow of Mr. Moses Gross, whose maiden name was Martha Pritchard, born in Boston, in 1773. At the time of his death he left the largest property of anyone in the town, a large portion of which was real estate, most of which has now passed into other hands. His house, which he built not far from the year 1790, is now the property of his granddaughter, the widow of the late Captain William Haskell.

EZRA HOWARD[edit]

was the settler upon the lot of land adjoining that of Mr. Ezekiel Marshall and that purchased of him by Mark Haskell on the southeast. He came here early, but the exact year is to us unknown, nor have we ever known from what place he removed here. He had three sons and four daughters, of whom we have had knowledge: one was the Mr. John Howard we have already noticed; another .was Mr. Michael Howard, ~ho lived and died at what is known as "Fish Creek," the father of the late Mr. Samuel and the present Mr. Thomas V. Howard; and one named Benjamin, who removed from here to Newburyport in 1812, where he died. One daughter was the wife of Mr. . Chase Pressey; another was the wife of Mr. Paul, Pressey, another, that of Mr. Dominicus Carnian; and the other, of Mr. James Parker, who formerly resided here, and was the father of John H. Parker, Esq., who formerly resided in the town of Mt. Desert. After the death of his wife, Mr. Howard married a Mrs. Johnson; and her two daughters by her former husband were the wives of Deacon Nehemiah Closson and the first wife of Mr. George G. Choate. The year of the death of Mr. Howard is not to us known, and his estate passed by purchase of his heirs to Ignatius Haskell, Esq.; with the exception of a house-lot none of it was owned by his descendants after his death.

AMBROSE COLBY[edit]

was the occupant of the lot lying on the southeast of that of Mr. Howard. He came from the vicinity of Newburyport not far from 1768, and after he came he married a daughter of Mr. John Pressey. He died not far from the year 1800, and his wife survived him till 1844, and was at the time of her death aged ninety-two years. He built a large house opposite the present Congregational Church, upon the site now occupied by the house of Mr. Frederick H. Gross, and it was for many years occupied by Mr. Amos Gordon, who married a daughter of Mr. Colby. He left two sons, Messrs. Hezekiah and Ambrose Colby, and the daughter referred to, who was first the wife of Mr. William Torrey, by whom she had two sons, Hezekiah and William Torrey, and a daughter, the first wife of John, P. Johnson, Esq. Hezekiah Torrey was, in 1822, the representative of this town to the Legislature, and afterward removed to Belfast, where he died in 1824, much esteemed. The other son, Mr. William Torrey, died on his passage to California, not far from the year 1850, and was at the time of his death over fifty years of age. By her second marriage she had two sons and two daughters who survived her: Mr. Ambrose C. Gordon, who died in 1880; Captain John Gordon, who died in Bluehill, to which place he had removed. The two daughters were the wives of Mr. Levi Carm':ln and Captain Joseph W. Pressey, and they both are now dead. Mr. Gordon, the husband of the daughter of Mr. Colby, came here from Biddeford, Maine, where his relatives still reside. He died several years ago, and none of that name are left in the town.

The lot of land adjoining that of Mr. Colby on the southeast was what is still known as the" parsonage." It contained originally four hundred acres, and was granted by the General Court of Massachusetts to the first religious society and the first settled minister. Rev. Peter Powers, the first settled minister, became proprietor of that part of the,land, and settled upon the southeastern side of the lot, and after his death, in 1800, it passed into the hands of his son, Mr. Prescott Powers, and the farm of Mr. Levi Greenlaw is a part of it. More will be said of the Rev. Mr. Powers in the part of this work in which the religious societies in the town are noticed.

NATHANIEL BRAY and ROBERT NASON[edit]

were the settlers upon the lot of land containing, according to Peters's plan of the town, over two hundred and fifty acres, which adjoined the parsonage lot on the southeast. They both came here not far from 1768, and were, we believe, connected by marriage. Mr. Bray settled upon the western, part of the lot; he was a brother of the wife of Captain Mark Haskell. Mr. Bray was the father of Nathaniel and William Bray, and his daughters were the wives of Mr. Benjamin Cole, who occupied the lot of land adjoining that of Deacon Joshua Haskell; of Mr. Willaby Nason; of Mr. Edward Howard, of Brooksville; of Mr. Peter Perry, and of Mr. Ezekiel Morey, 2d.

Mr. Nason occupied the eastern part of the lot, and it was the farm since owned by Mr. Ezekiel Marshall. Of him but little is known. One of his sons, Mr. Willaby Nason, lived here a number of years, and afterward removed to the town of Knox, in Waldo County, where he died. A daughter of Mr. Nason, Sr. was the wife of Mr. Nathaniel Bray, Jr., and mother of Messrs. Robert, Jonathan, Nathaniel, John N., Daniel, Willaby N., and Isaac Bray. The daughters were the wives of Jeremiah and Andrew Gray; and Mr. David Campbell, who removed to the British provinces. Mrs. Bray died several years ago, and all her children are now dead. Four of her sons died very suddenly, and so have some of her grandchildren.

On the western side of the Northwest Harbor the first settlement was made not long after the first made in the town, by Mr. John Pressey, as early perhaps as 1765. He came from Salisbury, Massachusetts, or some place in that vicinity, as that was the residence of his wife, whose maiden name was Chase - one of the "Chase heirs" about whom much was said not far from the year 1845. He must been past middle age at the time of his coming, and the time of his death is not to us known. His house was near the shore, and his remains lie not far from the edge of the bank. His sons were John, Jr., Chas., and Paul Pressey. One of his daughters was the Mrs. Colby before mentioned, and another was the wife of Mr. Nathan Johnson and mother of the present John P. Johnson, Esq., who is now (1881) eighty-four years of age. The name was originally "Percy' as appeared from what was known as a coat-of-arms which was kept in the family many years.

JOHN PRESSEY, JR.[edit]

settled upon the lot of land adjoining that of his father upon the southwest, and we should judge had a family at the time of his removal. His death was caused by a tree falling upon him while chopping, but the time of its occurrence is not to us known. His children were: John Pressey, 3d, the father of Mr. Henry Pressey, who was lost in 1849 or 1850, in the schooner Tamerlane, Captain John G. Green, master. His daughters were the wives of Mr. John Howard, before noticed; Mr. Joseph Webster, of North Haven, and Mr. Michael Howard, the son of Mr. Ezra Howard; another was never married, whose name was Mercy Pressey. She for many years resided with Mr. Nathan Crockett, as housekeeper, who at his decease made provision for her support.

The farm of Mr. John Pressey, Jr. was divided, and one part of it is now the property of Mr. Aaron D. Pickering and the remainder was that' of Mr. Jonathan Pressey at the time of his death.

THOMAS SAUNDERS[edit]

who came here from Amesbury in the State of Massachusetts, settled upon the lot of land lying westerly of, and adjoining, that of Mr. John Pressey, Jr. His wife was Miss Hephzibah Chase, of Salisbury, Massachusetts, and they were married in Hampton, New Hampshire, in 1755; in 1757 they moved to Amesbury, and came here in 1771. His wife and that of Mr. John Pressey were sisters. Mr. Saunders was drowned near the mouth of the Northwest Harbor in June, 1786, while engaged in towing some logs which were to be manufactured into pumps for the purpose of pumping salt water for the manufacture of salt. He left two sons, Messrs. James and Timothy Saunders, and two daughters, one the wife of Mr. ,John Dow; another, that of Mr. Thomas Small, Jr. His farm passed into the hands of his son, who occupied it till they died. It now is the property of their descendants. The wife of Mr. James Saunders, was Susan Webb, a daughter of Mr. Seth Webb, one of the early settlers; that of Mr. Timothy Saunders was Ann Staples, the daughter of the person of that name before noticed as having been impressed into the British service during the war of the Revolution.

The children of Mr. James Saunders were Thomas and James, the sons; and the daughters were the wives of Messrs. Crowell H. Sylvester, Joseph Whitmore, and afterward of Dr. Robert Young, a practitioner of medicine, who made the treatment of cancers a specialty. After his death she was that of Jonah Dodge, of Brooklin, Maine, and lastly, that of Mr. Sylvester, the husband of her sister, and she was four times a widow. Another was that of Mr. John Averill, of Castine, and, afterward that of Mr. Josiah B. Woods, of the same place. Another was that of Captain Henry Lufkin, Jr.; another, that of Captain Joseph R. Lufkin; and another, that of Mr. Benjamin Lufkin, all of whom are now dead, with the exception of the widow of Captain J. R. Lufkin, who is now (1882) eighty-one years of age.

The children of Mr. Timothy Saunders were Samuel, John, Asa, and Timothy, sons; the daughters were the wives of Messrs. Thomas, Ezra, and Joshua Pressey, and Captain David Haskell; all the family are now dead.

JONATHAN EATON[edit]

a native of Haverhill, Massachusetts, was the settler upon the lot of land adjoining that of Mr. Saunders on the west. He was the youngest brother of Mr. Theophilus Eaton and was born in 1746. His father dying in his childhood, he was brought up' by his eldest brother' Theophilus. His wife was Miss Diana Dow, a daughter of Mr. Nathan Dow, with whom he came here in 1767, having previously married; and in the year of his removal his eldest son was born here. He was a man of enterprise and, as it has been stated, was engaged in the business of boiling salt. He died in 1805, at the age of fifty-nine years. His children were: Joseph, who lived and died in Sedgwick; Jonathan; John, who was drowned in 1814, while engaged with Mr. Joseph Whitmore, Jr. and a Mr. Brown, of Vinal Haven, in taking a cow across the bay to Vinal Haven in a boat. Their bodies were never found, but that of the cow came ashore on what is called Sellers's Point. Another son was the late Mr. Nathan Eaton, who occupied the homestead of his father. Another was James Eaton, who removed to the town of Prospect, where he lived till his death. The daughters were the wives of Mr. Joseph Weed, Mr. William Weed, and Mr. Samuel Webb. The house built by Mr. Eaton is still standing and has recently been thoroughly repaired; it is now more than ninety years old.

ELIJAH DUNHAM, SR.[edit]

with his sons Elijah and Joseph Dunham occupied the lot westerly of that of Mr. Eaton, on what is still known as Dunham's Point, upon which is located the silver-mine, which is being operated. Mr. Dunham was twice married, and by his first wife he had the two sons mentioned and a daughter, the wife of Mr. Samuel Pickering and the mother of the late Captain Samuel and Mr. Daniel Pickering. Mr. Pickering settled what is kIiown as Pickering's Island, lying northwesterly of Deer Island, which is not included within the territorial limits of the town. By his last wife Mr. Dunham had one son, the late Mr. Elisha H. Dunham, and two daughters. He did not remain long on the lot taken up by him, and it came into the possession of Messrs. Mark Haskell.