Anglo-Saxon Riddles of the Exeter Book/68

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Anglo-Saxon Riddles of the Exeter Book  (1963) , translated by Paull Franklin Baum
68 (k-d 24)


I’m a wonderful thing;     I vary my voice:
I bark like a dog,     I bleat like a goat,
I quack like a goose,     I shriek like a hawk;
I imitate the eagle,     the gray one, the cry
Of the fighting bird;     sometimes the kite’s voice
is familiar to my mouth,     or the sea-mew’s song,
where I happily sit.    
GIFT is my name,
O
AK and RIDING     and the GOD helps,
HAIL and ICE.     Now you have my name,
as those six letters     clearly betoken.









10
Ic eom wunderlicu wiht     wræsne mine stefne ·
hwilum beorce swa hund ·     hwilū blæte swa gat ·
hwilum græde swa gōs ·     hwilū gielle swa hafoc ·
hwilū ic onhyrge     þone haswan earn
guðfugles hleoþor ·     hwilum glidan reorde
muþe gemæne ·     hwilum mæwes song
þær ic glado sitte     ·
· mec nemnað
swylce ·
· · ·     · fullesteð
·
· · ·     nu ic haten eom
swa þa siex stafas     sweotule becnaþ

Here the runes are given their names, which of course are not intended to make sense; but their initial letters (underlined in the translation) are G A R O H I, which transposed spell HIGORA, jay or magpie. This is more like a puzzle than a riddle. If Jay is the solution of 22 (k-d 8), the two writers listened with different ears.