Announcement of Launch of USS Constitution

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Announcement of Launch of USS Constitution
by George Claghorn
NOTE: This document is presented in its original 18th century format, with Long S's and ligatures intact. Some fonts may not support these special characters.

Navy-Yard.

BOSTON, September 18, 1797.

The Conſtruc͡tor, having extended to his fellow-citizens all reaſonable gratification
of their laudable curioſity, during the progreſs of the building, believes he may,
with propriety, make the following requeſt and ſuggeſtions, on the operation of launch-
ing the frigate CONSTITUTION.

That (excepting the Preſident of the United States, the Governor, Lieut. Governor,
and their reſpec͡tive ſuites, and others ſpecially admitted, who will, comparitively, be
very few) no perſon will attempt, in any way, to paſs into the limits of the Navy Yard.

The reaſon of this requeſt is obviouſly to prevent interruption or confuſion, which
might be injurious, or ruinous, to the ac͡t of launching, which will be critical, under
the moſt favorable circumſtances, and indeſpenſably requiring perfec͡t ſilence and obe-
dience to orders. Independent of this concluſive reaſon, the danger of encroaching ſpec-
tators would be imminent, from the occaſional and abrupt falling of bodies, uſed in the
conſtruc͡tion of the ſhip—a conformity therefore, to this requeſt, is earneſtly ſolicited.

It is ſuggeſted, as the tide will be full, that it would be neceſſary to the ſafety of the
ſpec͡tators, particularly women and children, that they do not approach in crowds
too near the margin of the contiguous wharves, as the ſudden entrance of ſo large a bo-
dy as the Frigate, will occasion an inſtantaneous ſwell of the water, the height of which
cannot be eaſily calculated, and againſt which, therefore, the diſcretion of the people
ought amply to guard.

It is to be regretted, in this inſtance, that the Yard, and the places around it, are too
contrac͡ted for an occaſion, which will probably excite ſo much deſire, and in which all
the citizens have ſo much intereſt; it is therefore ſubmitted to thoſe, who can conven-
iently make the arrangement, to place themſelves in veſſels, or water crafts, at due diſ-
tances, upon the profile or ſides of the Frigate, but by no means too near, either in a
right line, or otherwiſe, as the direc͡tion may be uncertain, nor to load open boats too
deeply, as the agitation of the water, even at a conſiderable diſtance, may be ſomewhat
hazardous.

It is alſo recommended, to thoſe who erec͡t ſtages to accomodate ſpec͡tators, that they
have them well ſecured, in every reſpec͡t, as the loſs of life of a ſingle citizen, would mar
the ſatisfac͡tion and pleaſure that the Conſtruc͡tor otherwiſe would enjoy, of building,
and conduc͡ting into the ocean, a POWERFUL AGENT OF NATIONAL JUSTICE, which
hope dic͡tates may become the juſt pride and ornament of the American name.

GEORGE CLAGHORN.