Ante-Nicene Fathers/Volume VIII/Pseudo-Clementine Literature/The Recognitions of Clement/Book I/Chapter 3

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Ante-Nicene Fathers Vol. VIII, Pseudo-Clementine Literature, The Recognitions of Clement, Book I
Anonymous, translated by Thomas Smith
Chapter 3

Chapter III.—His Dissatisfaction with the Schools of the Philosophers.

Having therefore such a bent of mind from my earliest years, the desire of learning something led me to frequent the schools of the philosophers.  There I saw that nought else was done, save that doctrines were asserted and controverted without end, contests were waged, and the arts of syllogisms and the subtleties of conclusions were discussed.  If at any time the doctrine of the immortality of the soul prevailed, I was thankful; if at any time it was impugned, I went away sorrowful.  Still, neither doctrine had the power of truth over my heart.  This only I understood, that opinions and definitions of things were accounted true or false, not in accordance with their nature and the truth of the arguments, but in proportion to the talents of those who supported them.  And I was all the more tortured in the bottom of my heart, because I was neither able to lay hold of any of those things which were spoken as firmly established, nor was I able to lay aside the desire of inquiry; but the more I endeavoured to neglect and despise them, so much the more eagerly, as I have said, did a desire of this sort, creeping in upon me secretly as with a kind of pleasure, take possession of my heart and mind.