Armistice Day

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Our American Holidays


ARMISTICE DAY


OUR AMERICAN HOLIDAYS

Edited by Robert Haven Schauffler

ARBOR DAY (April)

ARMISTICE DAY (November 11)

CHRISTMAS (December 25)

EASTER (March or April)

FLAG DAY (June 14)

INDEPENDENCE DAY (July 4)

LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY (February 12)

MEMORIAL DAY (May 30)

MOTHER'S DAY (Second Sunday in May)

THANKSGIVING (Last Thursday in November)

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY (February 22)


Our American Holidays



ARMISTICE DAY


AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE BEST PROSE AND VERSE ON PATRIOTISM, THE GREAT WAR, THE ARMISTICE,—ITS HISTORY, OBSERVANCE, SPIRIT AND SIGNIFICANCE; VICTORY, THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER AND HIS BROTHERS, AND PEACE. WITH FICTION, DRAMA, PAGEANTRY AND PROGRAMS FOR ARMISTICE DAY OBSERVANCE.


COMPILED AND EDITED BY

A. P. Sanford

AND

Robert Haven Schauffler


Armistice Day, Sanford, 1927 logo.jpg


NEW YORK

DODD, MEAD AND COMPANY

1927


Copyright, 1927,
By DODD, MEAD AND COMPANY, Inc.



PRINTED IN THE U. S. A. BY
Quinn & Boden Company, Inc.


BOOK MANUFACTURERS
RAHWAY NEW JERSEY


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The editors wish to acknowledge with sincere gratitude the generous help given them in the preparation of this volume by Miss Mary Emogene Hazeltine of the University of Wisconsin Library School (author of "Anniversaries and Holidays"); by Franklin Hopper, Chief of Circulation, New York Public Library; Miss Eugenia Krauss, Librarian of the Epiphany Branch, New York Public Library, and her staff; Mr. Edmund W. Miller, Librarian of the Free Public Library, Jersey City, N. J.; and by the many Boy Scout and American Legion officials, librarians and school teachers who have contributed suggestions and material.

For their kind permission to reprint copyrighted selections grateful acknowledgment is due to:

Allyn & Bacon: From "Soldiers of Freedom" by Woodrow Wilson, from "Hill's American Patriotism," and from "President Wilson's Proclamation."

Atlantic Monthly: "Flanders Poppies," by Ian Colvin.

The Bobbs-Merrill Company: "A Monument for the Soldiers," by James Whitcomb Riley, from "Green Fields and Running Brooks." Copyright, 1892-1919. Used by special permission of the publishers.

The Christian Century: "November 11th as a Day of Prayer."

The Committee on Peace and Service of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting: "The Christ of the Andes," by Anna P. Hannum. Used by permission.

Doubleday, Page & Company: "Peace" from "Wit and Wisdom of Woodrow Wilson," by Woodrow Wilson, and "Self-Sacrifice" by Woodrow Wilson.

E. P. Dutton & Company: "Aftermath" and "The Armistice—Every One Sang" by permission, from "Picture-Show" by Seigfired Sasson. Copyright by E. P. Dutton & Company.

Eldridge Entertainment House, Inc., Franklin, Ohio: "Armistice Day: Lest We Forget," by Alma Lundman.

Harper & Brothers: "The Call," by O. W. Firkins.

Henry Holt and Company: "The Day of Glory" by Dorothy Canfield, from "The Day of Glory."

Houghton Mifflin Company: "For Thee They Died" by John Drinkwater; "The Look in Their Eyes" and "The White Comrade," by Robert Haven Schauffler; "Rheims Cathedral," by Grace Hazard Conkling, from "Afternoons in April." Reprinted by permission of, and by arrangement with, Houghton Mifflin Company.

The Independent: "The Last Shot" and "The Signing of the Armistice"; "The Fruits of Victory," by William Howard Taft. Used by permission.

Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.: "Victory Bells" and "The Nightingales of Flanders." Reprinted from "Wilderness Songs" by Grace Hazard Conkling, by permission of and special arrangement with Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., authorized publishers.

Little, Brown and Company: "The Unseen Host" from "The Unseen Host and Other War Plays" by Percival Wilde.

The Macmillan Company: "At Gallipoli" by John Masefield; "Sew the Flags Together" by Vachel Lindsay; "To My Country," by Marguerite Wilkinson. Used by permission.

March Brothers: From "Lest We Forget," published in book form by March Brothers, Lebanon, Ohio, at 40 cents.

McClelland and Stewart Limited: "After Battle," "The Fallen" and "To the Canadian Mothers—1914-1918," from "The Collected Poems of Duncan Campbell Scott." Used by permission of author and publishers.

Humphrey Milford: "When There is Peace" and "Clean Hands," by Austin Dobson. Used by permission of Humphrey Milford, publisher, and Mr. A. T. A. Dobson, acting for the Trustees.

The New York Evening Post: "These Ten Years Since We Went to War." Reprinted by permission.

The New York Herald Tribune: "Armistice Day," an editorial; "Lest We Forget: Armistice Day, 1926," by Curtis Wheeler. Reprinted by permission.

The New York Sun: "What Americans Believe In," by Charles W. Eliot. Reprinted by permission.

The New York Times: "Armistice," by Charles Buxton Going; "Armistice Day," an editorial; from "Interview with Dr. Nicholas Butler"; "Letter by an American Officer"; "The Unknown Soldier Honored by England," by Sir Philip Gibbs.

The North American Review: "The Call," by O. W. Firkins.

The Outlook: "How America Finished," by Gregory Mason; "Hymn for the Victorious Dead," by Hermann Hagedorn; "Patriotism," by Lyman Abbott; and "Peace," by Harold Trowbridge Pulsifer.

The Penn Publishing Company: "America Goes in Singing." Used by permission of and arrangement with The Penn Publishing Company, Philadelphia, Pa., publishers of "Patriotic Pieces from the Great War."

Punch: "Paris Again" and "V. A. D." Reprinted by permission of the "Proprietors of Punch."

Rand McNally & Company: "Comrades in a Common Cause," by Bishop Brent; "President Wilson's War Message."

Charles Scribner's Sons: "I Have a Rendezvous With Death" and "From Letters and Diary," by Alan Seeger; "The Image," by E. H. Sothern. Copyright, 1919, by Charles Scribner's Sons; "To Italy" and "To Peace, With Victory," by Corinne Roosevelt Robinson; "The Land" and "The Young Dead," by Maxwell Struthers Burt; "Aes Triplex," by Robert Louis Stevenson; "Green Hill Far Away," by John Galsworthy, from "Tatterdemalion." Copyright, 1920, by Charles Scribner's Sons. By permission of the publishers.

The Viking Press: "Saecla Ferarum," from "Tutankhamen," by William Ellery Leonard. New York: The Viking Press. Copyright, 1924, by B. W. Huebsch, Inc.; "May Night" and "To the Dead Doughboys," from "The Lynching Bee," by William Ellery Leonard. New York: The Viking Press. Copyright, 1920, by B. W. Huebsch, Inc.


ARMISTICE DAY

INTRODUCTION

A young orderly burst into the Mars hospital ward and a tingling hush of premonition leaped from bed to bed down the long double row of wounded officers.

"The Colonel has received the following dispatch: 'At 11 A.M., to-day, firing will cease on all fronts. This is official!'"

Even after the door had slammed, the incredible hush continued. In common with all the dwellers on earth we were living through the most significant, the most poignant, the most stupendous moment of our lives.


Between these covers has been brought together the best poetry and prose which could be found, dealing with this day of exultant glory, its history, spirit and significance,—and with those allied subjects, the War and the victory which preceded the Armistice, the heroes who gave their all to win it, and the resultant peace with its cloud of attendant problems.

It is hoped that this volume may serve to clarify, emphasize and perpetuate that truer, larger spirit of the day which has been succinctly expressed in these two letters:


FROM EDWIN C. BROOME, SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, PHILADELPHIA, TO HIS PRINCIPALS, OCT. 29, 1926.

As the years pass, our personal recollections of the war period,—of the sacrifices, of the enthusiasms, and of the ideals of those days,—inevitably become less vivid. It is of prime importance for the future peace of the world that the present generation shall be kept alive to the spirit which marked our participation in the World War and the hopes that burned so high on the day when the successful outcome of the struggle was assured. Annually, on November 11, the lesson of that day should be retaught in our schools.

I want to suggest that one of the most important pieces of constructive teaching which we should strive to accomplish in this connection is the reconciliation, in the minds of our pupils, of the ideals of patriotism and international good-will. Even young children can be brought to sense in simple form the conflict between competition on the one hand and coöperation on the other. These two opposite ideals of conduct should be presented not merely as symbolizing the age-old antithesis of selfishness and altruism. From the point of view of national welfare itself, it should be made clear that the united effort of the group works to the benefit of its individual members much more effectively than any competitive struggle.


TO THE AMERICAN LEGION, FROM ITS COMMANDER, 1921.

At 11 o'clock on the morning of November 11, 1918, an entire world, weary, worn and bent under the disaster of the World War, knelt in thanks to God. The guns ceased booming. A new note was in the air. A new hope was in every heart, a hope and a prayer that the fighting of nation against nation, of people against people, had ended for all time. We want to go back in spirit to that grand moment. We want to recall the purpose common to every one at that moment to do each his or her share to make impossible, ever again, such a disaster.


Armistice Day has not been officially designated as a national holiday. But in the following twenty-four States it is a legal holiday: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Maryland, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia and Hawaii.

In one other state an act of the legislature provides that the Governor shall issue annually a proclamation calling for the proper observance of Armistice Day. The American Legion is seeking the enactment of similar laws in the remaining States. The 60th Congress passed a resolution requiring the President to issue a proclamation calling upon officials to display the Flag on all government buildings on each Armistice Day, and inviting the people of the United States to observe the Day in schools, churches and other suitable places with appropriate ceremonies expressive of their gratitude for peace and their desire for the continuance of friendly relations with all other peoples.

In our celebration of this great holiday let us keep faith with the living and with the dead by reconsecrating our lives to that brotherhood of mankind and to the coming of those United States of the World which alone can give man, "the fighting animal," an enduring peace.

R. H. S.

 September, 1927.


CONTENTS
PAGE
Introduction ix
I
PATRIOTISM
Patriotism Lyman Abbott 3
America the Beautiful Katharine Lee Bates 4
What Americans Believe In Charles W. Eliot 6
The Trail Percy MacKaye 7
Soldiers of Freedom Woodrow Wilson 9
Relinquishing Theda Kenyon 10
What Is Patriotism? Agnes Repplier 11
To My Country Marguerite Wilkinson 15
Self-Sacrifice Woodrow Wilson 16
Stanzas on Freedom James Russell Lowell 16
II
WAR
The President's War Message Woodrow Wilson 21
Rheims Cathedral Grace Hazard Conkling 25
Draw the Sword, O Republic Edgar Lee Masters 26
From President Wilson's War Proclamation 28
Marching Song Dana Burnet 31
America Goes in Singing (From the Philadelphia Public Ledger) 33
I Have a Rendezvous with Death Alan Seeger 36
The Man of the Marne Bliss Carman 37
Letter by an American Officer Anonymous 39
The Hero of Vimy Brent Dow Allinson 40
The Look in Their Eyes Robert Haven Schauffler 42
Comrades in a Common Cause Bishop Brent 43
The Nightingales of Flanders Grace Hazard Conkling 45
Paris Again (From "Punch") 46
At Gallipoli John Masefield 48
Captain Guynemer Florence Earle Coates 50
From Letters and Diary Alan Seeger 52
Five Souls W. H. Ewer 56
April on the Battlefields Lenora Speyer 57
Front Line William Rose Benét 59
Eagle Youth Karle Wilson Baker 61
Prayer in the Trenches Brent Dow Allinson 62
De Profundis Brent Dow Allinson 63
V. A. D. (From "Punch") 64
Christmas 1917 Brent Dow Allinson 65
The Red Country William Rose Benét 67
The White Comrade Robert Haven Schauffler 70
III
THE ARMISTICE
Every One Sang Siegfried Sassoon 77
The Signing of the Armistice (From The Independent) 77
Armistice Day Angelo Patri 80
Armistice Day, 1918-1928 Nancy Byrd Turner 82
The Armistice (Full Text as Signed on November 11,1918) 83
Earth Song David McKee Wright 94
The Day of Glory Dorothy Canfield 96
Armistice Day, 1926 Lucia Trent 104
The Last Shot (From The Independent) 105
Peace at Morning Dana Burnet 110
Armistice Day (From New York Herald Tribune) 126
How America Finished Gregory Mason 128
The Great Armistice Robert Haven Schauffler 145
"A Green Hill Far Away" John Galsworthy 150
IV
SPIRIT AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ARMISTICE DAY
Suggested Address for Use by Legion Speaker on Armistice Day The American Legion 159
A Non-Denominational Prayer for Armistice Day Jewish Welfare Board 160
When Poppies Bloom Again Henry Albert Phillips 161
Armistice Day Mary Carolyn Davies 178
The War Thus Comes to an End Woodrow Wilson 179
Armistice Day: Lest We Forget Alma Lundman 184
Two Silences Robert Haven Schauffler 186
Message of Marshal Ferdinand Foch to the American Legion, November 11, 1921 187
Lest We Forget Curtis Wheeler 188
Marshal Foch's Armistice Day Message to America, 1926 Reported by Stephane Lauzanne 190
Saecla Ferarum William Ellery Leonard 198
V
VICTORY
Victory Bells Grace Howard Conkling 209
Psalm XLVI 210
Clean Hands Austin Dobson 211
Brest Left Behind John Chipman Farrar 212
Stacking the Needles Theda Kenyon 215
America's Welcome Home Henry Van Dyke 216
The Fruits of Victory William Howard Taft 218
The New Victory Margaret Widdemer 221
From a Song of Victory Edwin Markham 223
VI
THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER AND HIS BROTHERS
A Dead Warrior Laurence Housman 229
Unknown Bruce Barton 230
May Night William Ellery Leonard 233
To the Dead Doughboys William Ellery Leonard 234
Armistice Charles Buxton Going 234
The Unknown E. O. Laughlin 237
All This Is Ended Rupert Brooke 238
Our Honored Dead Henry Ward Beecher 239
The Unknown Harry Kemp 240
The Land Maxwell Struthers Burt 241
To the Canadian Mothers Duncan Campbell Scott 242
The Unknown Soldier Honored by England Sir Philip Gibbs 245
Soldier, Rest Sir Walter Scott 259
The Fallen Duncan Campbell Scott 260
The Old Soldier Katherine Tynan 261
The Dead Rupert Brooke 262
Flanders Poppies Ian Colvin 262
In Flanders Fields John McCrae 265
The Bivouac of the Dead Theodore O'Hara 266
Aes Triplex Robert Louis Stevenson 268
After Battle Duncan Campbell Scott 270
The Young Dead Maxwell Struthers Burt 270
Hymn for the Victorious Dead Hermann Hagedorn 272
A Monument for the Soldiers James Whitcomb Riley 273
The Soldier Rupert Brooke 275
For Thee They Died John Drinkwater 275
Address of Major General Fox Conner 276
The Young Dead Edith Wharton 278
The Unknown Soldier Angelo Patri 279
Before Marching, and After Thomas Hardy 281
VII
PEACE
Peace George Washington 285
Peace Rupert Brooke 285
I Would that Wars Would Cease Alfred Tennyson 286
Peace Woodrow Wilson 287
Peace at Too Great a Price Woodrow Wilson 287
Love Honor Only Better Then Peace Woodrow Wilson 288
The Spirit of America Is Peace Woodrow Wilson 288
Activities in Peace Woodrow Wilson 289
The Basis of Peace Woodrow Wilson 289
Friendship Breeds Peace Woodrow Wilson 290
Universal Peace Movement Woodrow Wilson 290
"Fixed Desire of the Human Heart" Woodrow Wilson 291
League of Nations Nancy Byrd Turner 292
Vale—Atque Salve M. A. De Wolfe Howe 293
The Known Soldier M. A. De Wolfe Howe 294
Disarmament John Greenleaf Whittier 295
To Peace Katharine Lee Bates 296
Re-Armament M. A. De Wolfe Howe 297
The Path to Peace Sidney S. Robins 299
To Italy Corinne Roosevelt Robinson 300
Prayer for the Spiritual Union of Mankind Harry Emerson Fosdick 301
Peace Harold Trowbridge Pulsifer 302
Aftermath Siegfried Sassoon 304
The United States of Europe: An Interview with Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler Edward Marshall 306
To Peace, With Victory Corinne Roosevelt Robinson 326
The Thousand Years of Peace Alfred Tennyson 327
"When There Is Peace" Austin Dobson 327
From Nocturne in a Library Arthur Davison Ficke 328
Love, Give Me the Feel of To-morrow Ralph Cheyney 330
Pacifists M. A. De Wolfe Howe 331
These Ten Years Since We Went to War (From The New York Evening Post) 332
Quotations for Peace Day From the Scriptures 336
After Florence Earle Coates 337
Sew the Flags Together Vachel Lindsay 338
The Christ of the Andes Edwin Markham 340
The Christ of the Andes Anna P. Hannum 342
The Universal Peace Alfred Tennyson 348
VIII
STORIES
The Call O. W. Firkins 353
The Contract of Corporal Twing Solon K. Stewart 364
The Image O. W. Firkins 392
IX
PLAYS AND A PAGEANTRY
The Unseen Host Percival Wilde 407
They Just Won't Talk Mary Katharine Reely 420
The Crowning of Peace Nora Archibald Smith 434
X
PROGRAMS FOR ARMISTICE DAY
Program Arranged by National Americanism Commission, American Legion, Indianapolis, Indiana 447
Programs Arranged by Someple and Others 448
Programs Suggested by Mary E. Hazeltine, Library School of the University of Wisconsin 453
Program for the Celebration of Armistice Day Suggested by The American Legion National Americanism Commission 455
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