Letters to Atticus/4.14

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Letters to Atticus by Marcus Tullius Cicero
4.14 (CXXXVII)
Translated by Evelyn Shuckburgh

To Atticus on a journey, from Cumae, May 54 BC

Our friend Vestorius[1] has informed me by letter that you are believed to have left Rome on the 10th of May—later than you said that you intended—because you had not been very well. If you are now better I rejoice indeed. I wish you would write to your town house, ordering your books to be at my service just as if you were at home, especially those of Varro. For I have occasion to use some passages of those books in reference to those which I have in hand, and which, I hope, will meet with your strong approval.[2] Pray, if by chance you have any news, principally from my brother Quintus, next from Caesar, and, finally, anything about the elections or about politics—for you have an excellent nose for such things—write and tell me about them: if you have no news, nevertheless write something. For a letter from you never yet seemed to me either ill-timed or too long-winded. But above all I beg that, when your business and your whole tour has been concluded to your mind, you will come back to us as soon as possible. Give my compliments to Dionysius. Take care of your health.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. A banker at Puteoli.
  2. The six books on the Republic.