Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)/Loyola University (New Orleans)

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Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)
Loyola University (New Orleans)


Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana, is (1912) the only Catholic university in what is popularly designated "The Old South". From a small college of arts and sciences founded by the Jesuit Fathers in 1904 it has grown into an institution with plans under way to organize all the departments of a modern university. The cornerstone of Marquette Hall, the main building of the university group, was laid, 13 November, 1910, by Archbishop Blenk, assisted by fourteen members of the American hierarchy. On the same day ground was broken for the Louise C. Thomas Hall by the Apostolic delegate, Monsignor Falconio. The building dedicated to Father Marquette will always bear witness to the generous cooperation of the clergy and laity of the Archdiocese of New Orleans, who, on the invitation and under the leadership of the Rev. Albert Biever, S.J., president of Loyola College, formed an association on 17 February, 1906, known as "The Marquette Association for Higher Education", which made it its aim to arouse interest in Catholic education while soliciting the financial aid necessary for the upbuilding of a well-equipped Catholic University. The Louise C. Thomas Hall has its name from the devoted lady who subscribed $50,000 towards its erection. The beauty and nobility of her gift is expressed in the stately architecture, which combines artistic qualities with usefulness. Both structures, connected by a graceful arcade or cloister, are in the Tudor Gothic style and stand on the beautiful site which fronts St. Charles Avenue, where that handsome driveway passes Audobon Park.

P.A. RYAN