Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)/Vicariate Apostolic of Kenia

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Catholic Encyclopedia (1913), Volume 8
Vicariate Apostolic of Kenia

by Stanley John Quinn


Coextensive with the civil province of Kenia (Kenya) in British East Africa, to which the station of Limuru is added. It extends east as far as the Rivers Tana and Seca, west to the Seca, south to the mountains of Aberdare and the River Guaso-Ugiro, while its northern limits are as yet indeterminate. Originally part of the Vicariate Apostolic of Northern Zanzibar, it was first entered by several priests of the Institute Consolata of Turin. In September, 1905, the Sacred Congregation of the Propaganda erected it into an independent mission, and in 1909 the mission was in turn created a vicariate Apostolic. Its superior, Father Philippus Perlo, was made titular Bishop of Maronia and the first head of the new vicariate. The climate of Kenia is, for the most part, temperate and healthy. The language of the natives is chiefly Kikuju and Kiswaili. The population is estimated at between 2,000,000 and 3,000,000, almost entirely savage, and given over to various forms of fetichism and nature-worship. Conversions, however, are being gradually effected. The vicariate includes 17 regular priests of the Institute Consolata; 10 European catechists; 80 chapels — the more important of which are located at Tusu-Kasongori, Fort Hall, Limuru, Kekondi, Niere, Mogoiri, and Karema; schools at the different stations; 1 orphanage; the Order of the Institute Consolata with 8 houses and 27 religious, and the nuns of St. Vincent Cottolengo with 6 houses and 31 sisters.

Missiones Catholic' (Rome 1907); PIOLET, Les Missions, V; Gerarchia Cattolica (Rome, 1909); Ann. Eccl. (Rome, 1908).

Stanley J. Quinn.