Child's Ballads/204

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Child's Collected Ballads by Francis James Child
"Jamie Douglas", no. 204


A[edit]

I WAS a lady of high renown
As lived in the north countrie;
I was a lady of high renown
Whan Earl Douglas loved me.
Whan we came through Glasgow toun,
We war a comely sight to see;
My gude lord in velvet green,
And I mysel in cramasie.
Whan we cam to Douglas toun,
We war a fine sight to behold;
My gude lord in cramasie,
And I myself in shining gold.
Whan that my auld son was born,
And set upon the nurse's knee,
I was as happy a woman as eer was born,
And my gude lord he loved me.
But oh, an my young son was born,
And set upon the nurse's knee,
And I mysel war dead and gane,
For a maid again I'll never be!
There cam a man into this house,
And Jamie Lockhart was his name,
And it was told to my gude lord
That I was in the bed wi him.
There cam anither to this house,
And a bad friend he was to me;
He put Jamie's shoon below my bed-stock,
And bade my gude lord come and see.
O wae be unto thee, Blackwood,
And ae an ill death may ye dee!
For ye was the first and the foremost man
That parted my gude lord and me.
Whan my gude lord cam in my room,
This grit falsehood for to see,
He turnd about, and, wi a gloom,
He straucht did tak farewell o me.
'O fare thee well, my once lovely maid!
O fare thee well, once dear to me!
O fare thee well, my once lovely maid!
For wi me again ye sall never be.'
'Sit doun, sit doun, Jamie Douglas,
Sit thee doun and dine wi me,
And Ill set thee on a chair of gold,
And a silver towel on thy knee.'
'Whan cockle-shells turn silver bells,
And mussels they bud on a tree,
Whan frost and snaw turns fire to burn,
Then I'll sit down and dine wi thee.'
O wae be unto thee, Blackwood,
And ae an ill death may ye dee!
Ye war the first and the foremost man
That parted my gude lord and me.
Whan my father he heard word
That my gude lord had forsaken me,
He sent fifty o his brisk dragoons
To fesh me hame to my ain countrie.
That morning before I did go,
My bonny palace for to leave,
I went into my gude lord's room,
But alas! he wad na speak to me.
'Fare thee well, Jamie Douglas!
Fare thee well, my ever dear to me!
Fare thee well, Jamie Douglas!
Be kind to the three babes I've born to thee.'

B[edit]

WALY, waly up the bank!
And waly, waly down the brae!
And waly, waly to yon burn-side,
Where me and my love wunt to gae!
As I lay sick, and very sick,
And sick was I, and like to die,
And Blacklaywood put in my love's ears
That he staid in bower too lang wi me.
As I lay sick, and very sick,
And sick was I, and like to die,
And walking into my garden green,
I heard my good lord lichtlie me.
Now woe betide ye, Blacklaywood!
I'm sure an ill death you must die;
Ye'll part me and my ain good lord,
And his face again I'll never see.
'Come down stairs now, Jamie Douglas,
Come down stairs and drink wine wi me;
I'll set thee into a chair of gold,
And not one farthing shall it cost thee.'
'When cockle-shells turn silver bells,
And muscles grow on every tree,
When frost and snaw turn fiery baas,
I'll come down the stair and drink wine wi thee.'
'What's needs me value you, Jamie Douglas,
More than you do value me?
The Earl of Mar is my father,
The Duke of York is my brother gay.
'But when my father gets word o this,
I trow a sorry man he'll be;
He'll send four score o his soldiers brave
To tak me hame to mine ain countrie.'
As I lay owre my castell-wa,
I beheld my father comin for me,
Wi trumpets sounding on every side;
But they werena music at a' for me.
'And fare ye weel now, Jamie Douglas!
And fare ye weel, my children three!
And fare ye weel, my own good lord!
For my face again ye shall never see.
'And fare ye weel now, Jamie Douglas!
And fare ye weel, my children three!
And fare ye weel now, Jamie Douglas!
But my youngest son shall gae wi me.'
'What ails ye at yer youngest son,
Sits smilin at the nurse's knee?
I'm sure he never knew any harm,
Except it was from his nurse or thee.'
. . . . . . .
. . . . . .
And when I was into my coaches set,
He made his trumpets a' to soun.
I've heard it said, and it's oft times seen,
The hawk that flies far frae her nest;
And a' the world shall plainly see
It's Jamie Douglas that I love best.
Ive heard it said, and [it's] oft times seen,
The hawk that flies from tree to tree;
And a' the world shall plainly see
It's for Jamie Douglas I maun die.

C[edit]

O WALLY, wally up yon bank!
And wally down yon brae!
And wally, wally up yon burn-side,
Where me and my lord wont to gae!
I leand me on yon saugh sae sweet,
I leand me on yon saugh sae sour,
And my gude lord has forsaken me,
And he swears he'll never loe me more.
There came a young man to this town,
And Jamie Lockhart was his name;
Fause Blackwood lilted in my lord's ear
That I was in the bed wi him.
'Come up, come up, Jamie Douglas,
Come up, come up and dine wi me,
And I'll set thee in a chair of gold,
And use you kindly on my knee.'
'When cockle-shells turn silver bells,
And mussels hing on every tree,
When frost and snow turn fire-brands,
Then I'll come up and dine wi thee.'
When my father and mother they got word
That my good lord had forsaken me,
They sent fourscore of soldiers brave
To bring me hame to my ain countrie.
That day that I was forc'd to go,
My pretty palace for to leave,
I went to the chamber were my lord lay,
But alas! he wad na speak to me.
'O fare ye weel, Jamie Douglas!
And fare ye weel, my children three!
I hope your father will prove mair kind
To you than he has been to me.
'You take every one to be like yoursel,
You take every one that comes unto thee;
But I could swear by the heavens high
That I never knew anither man but thee.
'O foul fa ye, fause Blackwood,
And an ill death now may ye die!
For ye was the first occasioner
Of parting my gude lord and me.'
Whan we gaed in by Edinburgh town,
My father and mither they met me,
Wi trumpets sounding on every side;
But alas! they could ne cherish me.
'Hold your tongue, daughter,' my father said,
'And with your weeping let me be;
And we'll get out a bill of divorce,
And I'll get a far better lord to thee.'
'O hold your tongue, father,' she says,
'And with your talking let me be;
I wad na gie a kiss a my ain lord's lips
For a' the men in the west country.'
Oh an I had my baby born,
And set upon the nurse's knee,
And I myself were dead and gone!
For a maid again I will never be.

D[edit]

I FELL sick, and very, very sick,
Sick I was, and like to dee;
A friend o mine cam frae the west,
A friend o mine came me to see,
And the black told it to my gude lord
He was oure lang in the chamber wi me.

  • * * * *

'Come doun the stair, Jamie Douglas,
Come doun and drink wine wi me;
I'll set ye on a chair of gold,
And not ae farthing will it cost thee.'
'Whan cockle-shells turn siller bells,
And fishes flee frae tree to tree,
Whan frost and snaw turn fire-beams,
I'll come doun and drink wine wi thee.'

  • * * * *

'What ails ye at your young son James,
That sits upo the nurse's knee?
I'm sure he never did ye no harm,
If it war na for the nurse or me.
'What care I for you, Jamie Douglas?
Not a small pin I value thee;
For my father he is the Earl of York,
And of that my mither's the gay ladie;
They will send fourscore of his soldiers bold
For to tak me hame to my ain countrie.'

  • * * * *

Whan I was set in my coach and six,
Taking fareweel o my babies three,
'I beg your father's grace to be kind,
For your face again I'll never see.'

  • * * * *

As I was walking up London streets,
My father was coming to meet me,
Wi trumpets sounding on every side;
But that was na music at a' for me.
'Hold your tongue, my dochter dear,
And of your weeping let abee;
A bill of divorcement I'll send to him,
A far better match I'll get for thee.'
'Hold your tongue, my father dear,
And with your folly let abee;
There'll never man sleep in my twa arms,
Sin my gude lord has forsaken me.'

  • * * * *

As I was sitting at my bouer-window,
What a blythe sicht did I see!
I saw four score of his soldiers bold,
And I wishd that they were coming for me.
Out bespeaks the foremost man,
And what a weel-spoken man was he!
'If the Marquis o Douglas's lady be within,
You'll bid her come doun and speak to me.'
It's out bespak my auld father then,
I wat an angry man was he;
'Ye may gang back the road ye cam,
For her face again ye'll never see.'
'Hold your tongue, my father dear,
And with your folly let abee;
For I'll ga back, and I'll ne'er return;
Do ye think I love you as weel as he?'
As I cam in by the Orange gate,
What a blythe sicht did I see!
I saw Jamie Douglas coming me to meet,
And at his foot was his babies three.
'Ga fetch, ga fetch a bottle of wine,
That I may drink to my gay ladie;'
She took the cup into her hand,
But her bonnie heart it broke in three.

E[edit]

I LAY sick, and very sick,
And I was bad, and like to dee;
. . . .
A friend o mine cam to visit me,
And Blackwood whisperd in my lord's ear
That he was oure lang in chamber wi me.
'O what need I dress up my head,
Nor what need I caim doun my hair,
Whan my gude lord has forsaken me,
And says he will na love me mair!
'But oh, an my young babe was born,
And set upon some nourice knee,
And I mysel war dead and gane!
For a maid again I'll never be.'
'Na mair o this, my dochter dear,
And of your mourning let abee;
For a bill of divorce I'll gar write for him,
A mair better lord I'll get for thee.'
'Na mair o this, my father dear,
And of your folly let abee;
For I wad ne gie ae look o my lord's face
For aw the lords in the haill cuntree.
'But I'll cast aff my robes o red,
And I'll put on my robes o blue,
And I will travel to some other land,
To see gin my love will on me rue.
'There shall na wash come on my face,
There shall na kaim come on my hair;
There shall neither coal nor candle-licht
Be seen intil my bouer na mair.
'O wae be to thee, Blackwood,
And an ill death may ye dee!
Foe ye've been the haill occasion
Of parting my lord and me.'

F[edit]

WALY, waly up yon bank!
And waly, waly up yon brae!
And waly, waly by yon river-side,
Where me and my love were wont to gae!
My mither tauld me when I was young
That young men's love was ill to trow;
But to her I would give nae ear,
And alas! my ain wand dings me now.
'But gin I had wist or I had kisst
That young man's love was sae ill to win,
I would hae lockt my heart wi a key o gowd,
And pinnd it wi a sillar pin.
When lairds and lords cam to this toun,
And gentlemen o a high degree,
I took my auld son in my arms,
And went to my chamber pleasantly.
But when gentlemen come thro this toun,
And gentlemen o a high degree,
I must sit alane in the dark,
And the babie on the nurse's knee.
I had a nurse, and she was fair,
She was a dearly nurse to me;
She took my gay lord frae my side,
And used him in her company.
Awa! awa, thou false Blackwood!
Ay and an ill death may thou die!
Thou wast the first occasioner
Of parting my gay lord and me.
When I was sick, and very sick,
Sick I was, and like to die,
I drew me near to my stair-head,
And I heard my own lord lichtly me.
'Come doun, come doun, thou Earl of March,
Come doun, come doun and dine with me;
I'll set thee on a chair of gowd,
And treat thee kindly on my knee!'
'When cockle-shells grow sillar bells,
And mussells grow on every tree,
When frost and snaw turns fiery ba's,
Then I'll come doun and dine with thee.'
When my father and mother got word
That my gay lord had forsaken me,
They sent three score of soldiers bold
To bring me to my own countrie.
When I in my coach was set,
My tenants all was with me tane;
They set them doun upon their knees,
And they begd me to come back again.
Fare ye weel, Jamie Douglas!
And fare ye weel, my babies three!
I wish your father may be kind
To these three faces that I do see.
When we cam in by Edinbro toun,
My father and mother they met me;
The cymbals sounded on every side,
But alace! the gave no comfort to me.
'Hold your tongue, my daughter dear,
And of your weeping let abee,
And I'll give him a bill of divorce,
And I'll get as good a lord to thee.'
'Hold your tongue, my father dear,
And of your scoffing let me bee;
I would rather hae a kiss of my own lord's mouth
As all the lords in the north countrie.'

G[edit]

O WALY, waly up the bank!
And waly, waly down the brae!
And waly by yon river side,
Where me and my lord was wont to gae!
An I had wit what I wit now,
Before I came over the river Tay,
I would hae staid at Lord Torchard's yetts,
And I micht hae been his own lady gay.
When I lay sick, and was very sick,
A friend of mine came me to see;
When our Blacklywood told it in my lord's ears
That he staid too long in chamber with me.
Woe be to thee, thou Blacklywood!
I wish an ill death may thou die;
For thou's been the first and occasion last
That put strife between my good lord and me.
When my father he heard of this,
His heart was like for to break in three;
He sent fourscore of his soldiers brave
For to take me home to mine own countree.
In the morning when I arose,
My bonnie palace for to see,
I came unto my lord's room-door,
But he would not speak one word to me.
'Come down the stair, my lord Jamie Douglas,
Come down and speak one word with me;
I'll set thee in a chair of gold,
And the never a penny it will cost thee.'
'When cockle-shells grow silver bells,
And grass grows over the highest tree,
When frost and snaw turns fiery bombs,
Then will I come down and drink wine with thee.'
O what need I care for Jamie Douglas
More than he needs to care for me?
For the Pord of Murray's my father dear,
And the Dike of York's daughter my mother be.
Thou thocht that I was just like thyself,
And took every one that I did see;
But I can swear by the heavens above
That I never knew a man but thee.
But fare thee well, my lord Jamie Douglas!
And fare you weel, my sma childer three!
God grant your father grace to be kind
Till I see you all in my own countrie.
Quickly, quickly then rose he up,
And quickly, quickly came he down;
When I was in my coaches set,
He made his trumpets all to sound.
As we came in by Edinburgh town,
My loving father came to meet me,
With trumpets sounding on every side;
But it was not comfort at all to me.
'O hold your tongue, my daughter dear,
And of your weeping pray let abee;
A bill of divorcement I'll to him send,
And a better lord I will chose for thee.'
'Hold your tongue, my father dear,
And of your flattery pray let abee;
I'll never lye in another man's arms,
Since my Jamie Douglas has forsaken me.'
It's often said in a foreign land
That the hawk she flies far from her nest;
It's often said, and it's very true,
He's far from me this day that I luve best.

H[edit]

O WALY, waly up the bank!
And waly, waly doun the brae!
And waly, waly by yon burn-side,
Whare me and my luve was wont to gae!
If I had kent what I ken now,
I wud neer hae crossed the waters o Tay;
For an I had staid at Argyle's yetts,
I might hae been his lady gay.
When I lay sick, and very sick,
And very sick, just like to die,
A gentleman, a friend of mine own,
A gentleman came me to see;
But Blackliewoods sounded in my luve's ears
He was too long in chamer with me.
O woe be to thee, Blackliewoods,
But an an ill death may you die!
Thou's been the first and occasion last
That eer put ill twixt my luve and me.
'Come down the stairs now, Jamie Douglas,
Come down the stairs and drink wine wi me;
I'll set thee in a chair of gold,
And it's not one penny it will cost thee.'
'When cockle-shells grow silver bells,
And gowd grows oer yon lily lea,
When frost and snaw grows fiery bombs,
I will come down and drink wine wi thee.'
'What ails you at our youngest son,
That sirs upon the nurse's knee?
I'm sure he's never done any harm
And it's not to his ain nurse and me.'
My loving father got word of this,
But and an angry man was he;
He sent three score of his soldiers brave
To take me to my own countrie.

  • * * * *

'O fare ye weel now, Jamie Douglas!
And fare ye weel, my children three!
God grant your father may prove kind
Till I see you in my own countrie.'
When she was set into her coach
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
'Cheer up your heart, my loving daughter,
Cheer up your heart, let your weeping bee!
A bill of divorce I will write to him,
And a far better lord I'll provide for thee.'
It's very true, and it's often said,
The hawk she's flown and she's left her nest;
But a' the warld may plainly see
They're far awa that I luve best.

I[edit]

'O WALY, waly up yon bank!
And waly, waly down yon brae!
And waly, waly by yon burn-bank,
Where me and my lord wont to gae!
'A gentleman of good account,
A friend of mine, came to visit me,
And Blackly whispered in my lord's ears
He was too long in chamber with me.
'When my father came to hear 't,
I wot an angry man was he;
He sent five score of his soldiers bright
To take me safe to my own countrie.
'Up in the mornin when I arose,
My bonnie palace for to lea,
And when I came to my lord's door,
The neer a word he would speak to me.
'Come down, come down, O Jamie Douglas,
And drink the Orange wine with me;
I'll set thee in a chair of gold,
That neer a penny it cost thee.'
'When sea and sand turns foreign land,
And mussels grow on every tree,
When cockle-shells turn silver bells,
I'll drink the Orange wine with thee.'
'Wae be to you, Blackly,' she said,
'Aye and an ill death may you die!
You are the first, and I hope the last,
That eer made my lord lichtly me.'
'Fare ye weel then, Jamie Douglas!
I value you as little as you do me;
The Earl of Mar is my father dear,
And I soon will see my own countrie.
'Ye thought that I was like yoursell,
And loving each ane I did see;
But here I swear, by the day I die,
I never loved a man but thee.
'Fare ye weel, my servants all!
And you, my bonny children three!
God grant your father grace to be kind
Till I see you safe in my own countrie.'
'As I came into Edinburgh toune,
With trumpets sounding my father met me;
But no mirth nor musick sounds in my ear,
Since the Earl of March has forsaken me.'
'O hold your tongue, my daughter dear,
And of your weeping let abee;
I'll send a bill of divorce to the Earl of March,
And get a better lord for thee.'
'Hold your tongue, my father dear,
And of your folly let abee;
No other lord shall lye in my arms,
Since the Earl of March has forsaken me.
'An I had known what I know now,
I'd never crossed the water o Tay,
But stayed still at Atholl's gates;
He would have made me his lady gay.'
When she came to her father's lands,
The tenants a' came her to see;
Never a word she could speak to them,
But the buttons off her clothes did flee.
'The linnet is a bonnie bird,
And aften flees far frae its nest;
So all the warld may plainly see
They're far awa that I luve best.'

J[edit]

O WALY, waly up yon bank!
And waly, waly doun yon brae!
And waly, waly by yon burn-side,
Where me and my luve used to gae!
Oh Johnie, Johnie, but love is bonnie
A little while, when it is new;
But when love grows aulder, it grows mair caulder,
And it fades awa like the mornin dew.
I leaned my back against an aik,
I thocht it was a trusty tree;
But first [it] bowed, and syne it brak,
And sae did my fause luve to me.
Once I lay sick, and very sick,
And a friend of mine cam to visit me,
But the small bird whispered in my love's ears
That he was ower lang in the room wi me.
'It's come down stairs, my Jamie Douglas,
Come down stairs, luve, and dine wi me;
I'll set you on a chair of gold,
And court ye kindly on my knee.'
'When cockle-shells grow silver bells,
And gold it grows on every tree,
When frost and snaw turns fiery balls,
Then, love, I'll come down and dine wi thee.'
If I had known what I know now,
That love it was sae ill to win,
I should neer hae wet my chefry cheek
For onie man or woman's son.
When my father he cam to know
That my first luve had sae slighted me,
He sent four score of his soldiers bright
To guard me home to my own countrie.
Slowly, slowly rose I up,
And slowly, slowly I came down,
And when he saw me sit in my coach,
He made his drums and trumpets sound.
It's fare ye weel, my pretty palace!
And fare ye weel, my children three!
And I hope your father will get mair grace,
And love you better that he's done to me.
When we came near to bonnie Edinburgh toun,
My father cam for to meet me;
He made his drums and trumpets sound,
But they were no comfort at all to me.
'It's hold your tongue, my daughter dear,
And of your weeping pray let be;
For a bill of divorcement I'll send to him,
And a better husband I'll you supply.'
'O hold your tongue, my father dear,
And of your folly pray now let be;
For there's neer a lord shall enter my bower,
Since my first love has so slighted me.'

K[edit]

O WALY, waly up the bank!
And waly, waly doun the brae!
And waly by yon river-side,
Where me and my love were wont to gae!
A gentleman, a friend of mine,
Came to the toun me for to see,
. . . .
. . .
'Come doun the stair, Jamie Douglas,
Come doun the stair and drink wine wi me;
For a chair of gold I will set thee in,
And not one farthing it will cost thee.'
'When cockle-shells grow siller bells,
And mussels grow on ilka tree,
When frost and snaw turns out fire-bombs,
Then I'll come doun and drink wine wi thee.'
But when her father heard of this,
O but an angry man was he!
And he sent four score of his ain regiment
To bring her hame to her ain countrie.
O when she was set in her coach and six,
And the saut tear was in her ee,
Saying, Fare you well, my bonnie palace!
And fare ye weel, my children three!
O when I came into Edinburgh toun,
My loving father for to see,
The trumpets were sounding on every side,
But they were not music at all for me.
'O hold your tongue, my daughter dear,
And of your folly I pray let be;
For a bill of divorcement I'll send him,
And a better lord I'll provide for thee.'
'O hold your tongue, my father dear,
And of your folly I pray let be;
For if I had stayed in fair Orange Green,
I might have been his gay ladye.'

L[edit]

WHEN I fell sick, an very sick,
An very sick, just like to die,
A gentleman of good account
He came on purpose to visit me;
But his blackie whispered in my lord's ear
He was owre lang in the room wi me.
'Gae, little page, an tell your lord,
Gin he will come and dine wi me
I'll set him on a chair of gold
And serve him on my bended knee.'
The little page gaed up the stair:
'Lord Douglas, dine wi your ladie;
She'll set ye on a chair of gold,
And serve you on her bended knee.'
'When cockle-shells turn silver bells,
When wine drieps red frae ilka tree,
When frost and snaw will warm us a',
Then I'll cum down an dine wi thee."]
But whan my father gat word o this,
O what an angry man was he!
He sent fourscore o his archers bauld
To bring me safe to his countrie.
When I rose up then in the morn,
My goodly palace for to lea,
I knocked at my lord's chamber-door,
But neer a word wad he speak to me.
But slowly, slowly, rose he up,
And slowly, slowly, cam he down,
And when he saw me set on my horse,
He caused his drums and trumpets soun.
'Now fare ye weel, my goodly palace!
And fare ye weel, my children three!
God grant your father grace to love you
Far more than ever he loved me.'
He thocht that I was like himsel,
That had a woman in every hall;
But I could swear, by the heavens clear,
I never loved man but himsel.
As on to Embro town we cam,
My guid father he welcomed me;
He caused his minstrels meet to sound,
It was nae music at a' to me.
'Now haud your tongue, my daughter dear,
Leave off your weeping, let it be;
For Jamie's divorcement I'll send over;
Far better lord I'll provide for thee.'
'Now haud your tongue, my father dear,
And of such talking let me be;
For never a man shall come to my arms,
Since my lord has sae slighted me.'
O an I had neer crossed the Tweed,
Nor yet been owre the river Dee,
I might hae staid at Lord Orgul's gate,
Where I wad hae been a gay ladie.
The ladies they will cum to town,
And they will cum and visit me;
But I'll set me down now in the dark,
For ochanie! who'll comfort me?
An wae betide ye, black Fastness,
Ay, and an ill deid may ye die!
Ye was the first and foremost man
Wha parted my true lord and me.

M[edit]

EARL DOUGLAS, than wham never knight
Had valour moe ne courtesie,
Yet he's now blamet be a' the land
For lightlying o his gay lady.
'Go, little page, and tell your lord,
Gin he will cum and dine wi me,
I'll set him on a seat of gold,
I'll serve him on my bended knee.'
The little page gaed up the stair:
'Lord Douglas, dine wi your lady;
She'll set ye on a seat of gold,
And serve ye on her bended knee.'
'When cockle-shells turn siller bells,
When mussels grow on ilka tree,
When frost and snow sall warm us a',
Then I sall dyne wi my ladie.
'Now wae betide ye, black Fastness,
Ay and an ill dead met ye die!
Ye was the first and foremost man
Wha parted my true lord and me.'

N[edit]

SHE looked out at her father's window,
To take a view of the countrie;
Who did she see but Jamie Douglas,
And along with him her children three!
There came a soldier to the gate,
And he did knock right hastilie:
'If Lady Douglas be within,
Bid her come down and speak to me.'
'O come away, my lady fair,
Come away now alang with me,
For I have hanged fause Blackwood,
At the very place where he told the lie.'

O[edit]

'O COME down stairs, Jamie Douglas,
O come down stairs and speak to me,
And I'll set thee in a fine chair of gowd,
And I'll kindly daut thee upon my knee.