Child's Ballads/39

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Child's Collected Ballads by Francis James Child
Tam Lin, no. 39
For more information, see Wikipedia: Tam Lin.

Tam Lin[edit]

A[edit]

O I FORBID you, maidens a’,
That wear gowd on your hair,
To come or gae by Carterhaugh,
For young Tam Lin is there.
There’s nane that gaes by Carterhaugh
But they leave him a wad,
Either their rings, or green mantles,
Or else their maidenhead.
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has broded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she’s awa to Carterhaugh,
As fast as she can hie.
When she came to Carterhaugh
Tam Lin was at the well,
And there she fand his steed standing,
But away was himsel.
She had na pu’d a double rose,
A rose but only twa,
Till up then started young Tam Lin,
Says, Lady, thou’s pu nae mae.
Why pu’s thou the rose, Janet,
And why breaks thou the wand?
Or why comes thou to Carterhaugh
Withoutten my command?
‘Carterhaugh, it is my ain,
My daddie gave it me;
I’ll come and gang by Carterhaugh,
And ask nae leave at thee.’
* * * * *
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has snooded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she is to her father’s ha,
As fast as she can hie.
Four and twenty ladies fair
Were playing at the ba,
And out then cam the fair Janet,
Ance the flower amang them a’.
Four and twenty ladies fair
Were playing at the chess,
And out then cam the fair Janet,
As green as onie glass.
Out then spak an auld grey knight,
Lay oer the castle wa,
And says, Alas, fair Janet, for thee
But we’ll be blamed a’.
‘Haud your tongue, ye auld fac’d knight,
Some ill death may ye die!
Father my bairn on whom I will,
I’ll father nane on thee.’
Out then spak her father dear,
And he spak meek and mild;
‘And ever alas, sweet Janet,’ he says,
‘I think thou gaes wi child.’
‘If that I gae wi child, father,
Mysel maun bear the blame;
There’s neer a laird about your ha
Shall get the bairn’s name.
‘If my love were an earthly knight,
As he’s an elfin grey,
I wad na gie my ain true-love
For nae lord that ye hae.
‘The steed that my true-love rides on
Is lighter than the wind;
Wi siller he is shod before,
Wi burning gowd behind.’
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has snooded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she’s awa to Carterhaugh,
As fast as she can hie.
When she cam to Carterhaugh,
Tam Lin was at the well,
And there she fand his steed standing,
But away was himsel.
She has na pu’d a double rose,
A rose but only twa,
Till up then started young Tam Lin,
Says Lady, thou pu’s nae mae.
Why pu’s thou the rose, Janet,
Amang the groves sae green,
And a’ to kill the bonie babe
That we gat us between?
‘O tell me, tell me, Tam Lin,’ she says,
‘For’s sake that died on tree,
If eer ye was in holy chapel,
Or chirstendom did see?’
‘Roxbrugh he was my grandfather,
Took me with him to bide,
And ance it fell upon a day
That wae did me betide.
‘And ance it fell upon a day,
A cauld day and a snell,
When we were frae the hunting come,
That frae my horse I fell;
The Queen o Fairies she caught me,
In yon green hill to dwell.
‘And pleasant is the fairy land,
But, an eerie tale to tell,
Ay at the end of seven years
We pay a tiend to hell;
I am sae fair and fu o flesh,
I’m feard it be mysel.
‘But the night is Halloween, lady,
The morn is Hallowday;
Then win me, win me, an ye will,
For weel I wat ye may.
‘Just at the mirk and midnight hour
The fairy folk will ride,
And they that wad their true-love win,
At Miles Cross they maun bide.’
39A.27 ‘But how shall I thee ken, Tam Lin,
Or how my true-love know,
Amang sae mony unco knights
The like I never saw?’
‘O first let pass the black, lady,
And syne let pass the brown,
But quickly run to the milk-white steed,
Pu ye his rider down.
‘For I’ll ride on the milk-white steed,
And ay nearest the town;
Because I was an earthly knight
They gie me that renown.
‘My right hand will be glovd, lady,
My left hand will be bare,
Cockt up shall my bonnet be,
And kaimd down shall my hair,
And thae’s the takens I gie thee,
Nae doubt I will be there.
‘They’ll turn me in your arms, lady,
Into an esk and adder;
But hold me fast, and fear me not,
I am your bairn’s father.
‘They’ll turn me to a bear sae grim,
And then a lion bold;
But hold me fast, and fear me not,
As ye shall love your child.
‘Again they’ll turn me in your arms
To a red het gaud of airn;
But hold me fast, and fear me not,
I’ll do to you nae harm.
‘And last they’ll turn me in your arms
Into the burning gleed;
Then throw me into well water,
O throw me in wi speed.
‘And then I’ll be your ain true-love,
I’ll turn a naked knight;
Then cover me wi your green mantle,
And cover me out o sight.’
Gloomy, gloomy was the night,
And eerie was the way,
As fair Jenny in her green mantle
To Miles Cross she did gae.
About the middle o the night
She heard the bridles ring;
This lady was as glad at that
As any earthly thing.
First she let the black pass by,
And syne she let the brown;
But quickly she ran to the milk-white steed,
And pu’d the rider down.
Sae weel she minded whae he did say,
And young Tam Lin did win;
Syne coverd him wi her green mantle,
As blythe’s a bird in spring.
Out then spak the Queen o Fairies,
Out of a bush o broom:
‘Them that has gotten young Tam Lin
Has gotten a stately groom.’
Out then spak the Queen o Fairies,
And an angry woman was she:
‘Shame betide her ill-far’d face,
And an ill death may she die,
For she’s taen awa the boniest knight
In a’ my companie.
‘But had I kend, Tam Lin,’ she says,
‘What now this night I see,
I wad hae taen out thy twa grey een,
And put in twa een o tree.’

B[edit]

I FORBID ye, maidens a’,
That wear goud on your gear,
To come and gae by Carterhaugh,
For young Tom Line is there.
There’s nane that gaes by Carterhaugh
But they leave him a wad.
Either their things or green mantles,
Or else their maidenhead.
But Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little above her knee,
And she has broded her yellow hair
A little above her bree,
And she has gaen for Carterhaugh,
As fast as she can hie.
When she came to Carterhaugh
Tom Line was at the well,
And there she fand his steed standing,
But away was himsell.
She hadna pu’d a double rose,
A rose but only twae,
Till up then started young Tom Line,
Says, Lady, thou’s pu nae mae.
Why pu’s thou the rose, Janet?
Why breaks thou the wand?
Why comest thou to Carterhaugh
Withouthen my command?
‘Fair Carterhaugh it is my ain,
My daddy gave it me;
I’ll come and gae by Carterhaugh,
And ask nae leave at thee.’
* * * * *
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has snooded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she is on to her father’s ha,
As fast as she can hie.
Four and twenty ladies fair
Were playing at the ba,
And out then came fair Janet,
The flowr amang them a’.
Four and twenty ladies fair
Were playing at the chess,
Out then came fair Janet,
As green as ony glass.
Out spak an auld grey-headed knight,
Lay owre the castle wa,
And says, Alas, fair Janet,
For thee we’ll be blam’d a’.
‘Had your tongue, you auld grey knight,
Some ill dead may ye die!
Father my bairn on whom I will,
I’ll father nane on thee.’
Out then spak her father dear,
He spak baith thick and milde;
‘And ever alas, sweet Janet,’ he says,
‘I think ye gae wi childe.’
‘If that I gae wi child, father,
Mysell bears a’ the blame;
There’s not a laird about your ha
Shall get the bairnie’s name.
‘If my lord were an earthly knight,
As he’s an elfish grey,
I wad na gie my ain true-love
For nae lord that ye hae.’
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has snooded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she’s away to Carterhaugh,
As fast as she can hie.
When she came to Carterhaugh,
Tom Line was at the well,
And there she faund his steed standing,
But away was himsell.
She hadna pu’d a double rose,
A rose but only twae,
Till up then started young Tom Line,
Says, Lady, thou’s pu na mae.
Why pu’s thou the rose, Janet,
Out owr yon groves sae green,
And a’ to kill your bonny babe,
That we gat us between?
‘O tell me, tell me, Tom,’ she says,
‘For’s sake who died on tree,
If eer ye were in holy chapel,
Or christendom did see.’
‘Roxburgh he was my grandfather,
Took me with him to bide,
And ance it fell upon a day
That wae did me betide.
‘Ance it fell upon a day,
A cauld day and a snell,
When we were frae the hunting come,
That from my horse I fell.
‘The Queen of Fairies she came by,
Took me wi her to dwell,
Evn where she has a pleasant land
For those that in it dwell,
But at the end o seven years,
They pay their teind to hell.
‘The night it is gude Halloween,
The fairie folk do ride,
And they that wad their true-love win,
At Miles Cross they maun bide.’
‘But how shall I thee ken, Thomas,
Or how shall I thee knaw,
Amang a pack o uncouth knights
The like I never saw?’
‘The first company that passes by,
Say na, and let them gae;
The next company that passes by,
Say na, and do right sae;
The third company that passes by,
Then I’ll be ane o thae.
‘Some ride upon a black, lady,
And some ride on a brown,
But I ride on a milk-white steed,
And ay nearest the town:
Because I was an earthly knight
They gae me that renown.
‘My right hand will be glovd, lady,
My left hand will be bare,
And thae’s the tokens I gie thee,
Nae doubt I will be there.
‘Then hie thee to the milk-white steed,
And pu me quickly down,
Cast thy green kirtle owr me,
And keep me frae the rain.
‘They’ll turn me in thy arms, lady,
An adder and a snake;
But hold me fast, let me na gae,
To be your warldly mate.
‘They’ll turn me in your arms, lady,
A grey greyhound to girn;
But hald me fast, let me na gae,
The father o your bairn.
‘They’ll turn me in your arms, lady,
A red het gad o iron;
Then haud me fast, and be na feard,
I’ll do to you nae harm.
‘They’ll turn me in your arms, lady,
A mother-naked man;
Cast your green kirtle owr me,
To keep me frae the rain.
‘First dip me in a stand o milk,
And then a stand o water;
Haud me fast, let me na gae,
I’ll be your bairnie’s father.’
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little aboon her knee,
And she has snooded her yellow hair
A little aboon her bree,
And she is on to Miles Cross,
As fast as she can hie.
The first company that passd by,
She said na, and let them gae;
The next company that passed by,
She said na, and did right sae;
The third company that passed by,
Then he was ane o thae.
She hied her to the milk-white steed,
And pu’d him quickly down;
She cast her green kirtle owr him,
To keep him frae the rain;
Then she did all was orderd her,
And sae recoverd him.
Then out then spak the Queen o Fairies,
Out o a bush o broom:
‘They that hae gotten young Tom Line
Hae got a stately groom.’
Out then spak the Queen o Fairies,
Out o a bush of rye:
‘Them that has gotten young Tom Line
Has the best knight in my company.
‘Had I kend, Thomas,’ she says,
‘A lady wad hae borrowd thee,
I wad hae taen out thy twa grey een,
Put in twa een o tree.
‘Had I but kend, Thomas,’ she says,
‘Before I came frae hame,
I had taen out that heart o flesh,
Put in a heart o stane.’

C[edit]

SHERR’rrS prickt hersell and prind hersell,
By the ae light o the moon,
And she’s awa to Kertonha,
As fast as she can gang.
‘What gars ye pu the rose, Jennet?
What gars ye break the tree?
What gars you gang to Kertonha
Without the leave of me?’
‘Yes, I will pu the rose, Thomas,
And I will break the tree;
For Kertonha shoud be my ain,
Nor ask I leave of thee.’
‘Full pleasant is the fairy land,
And happy there to dwell;
I am a fairy, lyth and limb,
Fair maiden, view me well.
‘O pleasant is the fairy land,
How happy there to dwell!
But ay at every seven years end
We’re a’ dung down to hell.
‘The morn is good Halloween,
And our court a’ will ride;
If ony maiden wins her man,
Then she may be his bride.
‘But first ye’ll let the black gae by,
And then ye’ll let the brown;
Then I’ll ride on a milk-white steed,
You’ll pu me to the ground.
‘And first, I’ll grow into your arms
An esk but and an edder;
Had me fast, let me not gang,
I’ll be your bairn’s father.
‘Next, I’ll grow into your arms
A toad but and an eel;
Had me fast, let me not gang,
If you do love me leel.
‘Last, I’ll grow into your arms
A dove but and a swan;
Then, maiden fair, you’ll let me go,
I’ll be a perfect man.’

D[edit]

O ALL you ladies young and gay,
Who are so sweet and fair,
Do not go into Chaster’s wood,
For Tomlin will be there.
Fair Margret sat in her bonny bower,
Sewing her silken seam,
And wished to be in Chaster’s wood,
Among the leaves so green.
She let her seam fall to her foot,
The needle to her toe,
And she has gone to Chaster’s wood,
As fast as she could go.
When she began to pull the flowers,
She pulld both red and green;
Then by did come, and by did go,
Said, Fair maid, let aleene.
‘O why pluck you the flowers, lady,
Or why climb you the tree?
Or why come ye to Chaster’s wood
Without the leave of me?’
‘O I will pull the flowers,’ she said,
‘Or I will break the tree,
For Chaster’s wood it is my own,
I’ll no ask leave at thee.’
He took her by the milk-white hand,
And by the grass green sleeve,
And laid her low down on the flowers,
At her he asked no leave.
The lady blushed, and sourly frowned,
And she did think great shame;
Says, ’if you are a gentleman,
You will tell me your name.’
‘First they did call me Jack,’ he said,
‘And then they called me John,
But since I lived in the fairy court
Tomlin has always been my name.
‘So do not pluck that flower, lady,
That has these pimples gray;
They would destroy the bonny babe
That we’ve got in our play.’
‘O tell me, Tomlin,’ she said,
‘And tell it to me soon,
Was you ever at good church-door,
Or got you christendoom?’
‘O I have been at good church-door,
And aff her yetts within;
I was the Laird of Foulis’s son,
The heir of all this land.
‘But it fell once upon a day,
As hunting I did ride,
As I rode east and west yon hill
There woe did me betide.
‘O drowsy, drowsy as I was!
Dead sleep upon me fell;
The Queen of Fairies she was there,
And took me to hersell.
‘The Elfins is a pretty place,
In which I love to dwell,
But yet at every seven years’ end
The last here goes to hell;
And as I am ane o flesh and blood,
I fear the next be mysell.
‘The morn at even is Halloween;
Our fairy court will ride,
Throw England and Scotland both,
Throw al the world wide;
And if ye would me borrow,
At Rides Cross ye may bide.
‘You may go into the Miles Moss,
Between twelve hours and one;
Take holy water in your hand,
And cast a compass round.
‘The first court that comes along,
You’ll let them all pass by;
The next court that comes along,
Salute them reverently.
‘The next court that comes along
Is clad in robes of green,
And it’s the head court of them all,
For in it rides the queen.
‘And I upon a milk-white steed,
With a gold star in my crown;
Because I am an earthly man
I’m next to the queen in renown.
‘Then seize upon me with a spring,
Then to the ground I’ll fa,
And then you’ll hear a rueful cry
That Tomlin is awa.
‘Then I’ll grow in your arms two
Like to a savage wild;
But hold me fast, let me not go,
I’m father of your child.
‘I’ll grow into your arms two
Like an adder or a snake;
But hold me fast, let me not go,
I’ll be your earthly maick.
‘I’ll grow into your arms two
Like iron in strong fire;
But hold me fast, let me not go,
Then you’ll have your desire.’
She rid down to Miles Cross,
Between twelve hours and one,
Took holy water in her hand,
And cast a compass round.
The first court that came along,
She let them all pass by;
The next court that came along
Saluted reverently.
The next court that came along
Were clad in robes of green,
When Tomlin, on a milk-white steed,
She saw ride with the queen.
She seized him in her arms two,
He to the ground did fa,
And then she heard a ruefull cry
‘Tomlin is now awa.’
He grew into her arms two
Like to a savage wild;
She held him fast, let him not go,
The father of her child.
He grew into her arms two
Like an adder or a snake;
She held him fast, let him not go,
He was her earthly maick.
He grew into her arms two
Like iron in hot fire;
She held him fast, let him not go,
He was her heart’s desire.
Then sounded out throw elphin court,
With a loud shout and a cry,
That the pretty maid of Chaster’s wood
That day had caught her prey.
‘O stay, Tomlin,’ cried Elphin Queen,
‘Till I pay you your fee;’
‘His father has lands and rents enough,
He wants no fee from thee.’
‘O had I known at early morn
Tomlin would from me gone,
I would have taken out his heart of flesh
Put in a heart of stone.’

E[edit]

LADY MARGARET is over gravel green,
And over gravel grey,
And she’s awa to Charteris ha,
Lang lang three hour or day.
She hadna pu’d a flower, a flower,
A flower but only ane,
Till up and started young Tamlin,
Says, Lady, let alane.
She hadna pu’d a flower, a flower,
A flower but only twa,
Till up and started young Tamlene,
Atween her and the wa.
‘How daur you pu my flower, madam?
How daur ye break my tree?
How daur ye come to Charter’s ha,
Without the leave of me?’
‘Weel I may pu the rose,’ she said,
‘But I daurna break the tree;
And Charter’s ha is my father’s,
And I’m his heir to be.’
‘If Charteris ha be thy father’s,
I was ance as gude mysell;
But as I came in by Lady Kirk,
And in by Lady Well,
‘Deep and drowsy was the sleep
On my poor body fell;
By came the Queen of Faery,
Made me with her to dwell.
‘But the morn at een is Halloween,
Our fairy foks a’ do ride;
And she that will her true-love win,
At Blackstock she must bide.
‘First let by the black,’ he said,
‘And syne let by the brown;
But when you see the milk-white steed,
You’ll pull his rider down.
‘You’ll pull him into thy arms,
Let his bricht bridle fa,
And he’ll fa low into your arms
Like stone in castle’s wa.
‘They’ll first shape him into your arms
An adder or a snake;
But hold him fast, let him not go,
He’ll be your world’s make.
‘They’ll next shape him into your arms
Like a wood black dog to bite;
Hold him fast, let him not go,
For he’ll be your heart’s delight.
‘They’ll next shape [him] into your arms
Like a red-het gaud o airn;
But hold him fast, let him not go,
He’s the father o your bairn.
‘They’ll next shape him into your arms
Like the laidliest worm of Ind;
But hold him fast, let him not go,
And cry aye "[Young Tamlin."]’
   * * * * *
Lady Margaret first let by the black,
And syne let by the brown,
But when she saw the milk-white steed
She pulled the rider down.
She pulled him into her arms,
Let his bright bridle fa’,
And he fell low into her arms,
Like stone in castle’s wa.
They first shaped him into arms
An adder or a snake;
But she held him fast, let him not go,
For he’d be her warld’s make.
They next shaped him into her arms
Like a wood black dog to bite;
But she held him fast, let him not go,
For he’d be her heart’s delight.
They next shaped him into her arms
Like a red-het gaud o airn;
But she held him fast, let him not go,
He’d be father o her bairn.
They next shaped him into her arms
Like the laidliest worm of Ind;
But she held him fast, let him not go,
And cried aye ‘Young Tamlin.’
The Queen of Faery turned her horse about,
Says, Adieu to thee, Tamlene!
For if I had kent what I ken this night,
If I had kent it yestreen,
I wad hae taen out thy heart o flesh,
And put in a heart o stane.

F[edit]

SHERR’rrS taen her petticoat by the band,
Her mantle owre her arm,
And she’s awa to Chester wood,
As fast as she could run.
She scarsely pulled a rose, a rose,
She scarse pulled two or three,
Till up there starts Thomas
On the Lady Margaret’s knee.
She’s taen her petticoat by the band,
Her mantle owre her arm,
And Lady Margaret’s gane hame agen,
As fast as she could run.
Up starts Lady Margaret’s sister,
An angry woman was she:
‘If there ever was a woman wi child,
Margaret, you are wi!’
Up starts Lady Margaret’s mother,
An angry woman was she:
‘There grows ane herb in yon kirk-yard
That will scathe the babe away.’
She took her petticoats by the band,
Her mantle owre her arm,
And she’s gane to yon kirk-yard
As fast as she could run.
She scarcely pulled an herb, an herb,
She scarse pulled two or three,
Till up starts there Thomas
Upon this Lady Margret’s knee.
‘How dare ye pull a rose?’ he says,
‘How dare ye break the tree?
How dare ye pull this herb,’ he says,
‘To scathe my babe away?
‘This night is Halloweve,’ he said,
‘Our court is going to waste,
And them that loves their true-love best
At Chester bridge they’ll meet.
‘First let pass the black,’ he says,
‘And then let pass the brown,
But when ye meet the milk-white steed,
Pull ye the rider down.
‘They’ll turn me to an eagle,’ he says,
‘And then into an ass;
Come, hold me fast, and fear me not,
The man that you love best.
‘They’ll turn me to a flash of fire,
And then to a naked man;
Come, wrap you your mantle me about,
And then you’ll have me won.’
She took her petticoats by the band,
Her mantle owre her arm,
And she’s awa to Chester bridge,
As fast as she could run.
And first she did let pass the black,
And then let pass the brown,
But when she met the milk-white steed,
She pulled the rider down.
They turned him in her arms an eagle,
And then into an ass;
But she held him fast, and feared him not,
The man that she loved best.
They turned him into a flash of fire,
And then into a naked man;
But she wrapped her mantle him about,
And then she had him won.
‘O wae be to ye, Lady Margaret,
And an ill death may you die,
For you’ve robbed me of the bravest knight
That eer rode in our company.’

G[edit]

TAKE warning, a’ ye ladies fair,
That wear gowd on your hair,
Come never unto Charter’s woods,
For Tam-a-line he’s there.
Even about that knight’s middle
O’ siller bells are nine;
Nae ane comes to Charter wood,
And a maid returns again.
Lady Margaret sits in her bower door,
Sewing at her silken seam;
And she langd to gang to Charter woods,
To pou the roses green.
She hadna poud a rose, a rose,
Nor broken a branch but ane,
Till by it came him true Tam-a-line,
Says, Ladye, lat alane.
O why pou ye the rose, the rose?
Or why brake ye the tree?
Or why come ye to Charter woods,
Without leave askd of me?
‘I will pou the rose, the rose,
And I will brake the tree;
Charter woods are a’ my ain,
I’ll ask nae leave o thee.’
He’s taen her by the milk-white hand,
And by the grass-green sleeve,
And laid her low on gude green wood,
At her he spierd nae leave.
When he had got his wills of her,
His wills as he had taen,
He’s taen her by the middle sma,
Set her to feet again.
She turnd her right and round about,
To spier her true-love’s name,
But naething heard she, nor naething saw,
As a’ the woods grew dim.
Seven days she tarried there,
Saw neither sun nor meen;
At length, by a sma glimmering light,
Came thro the wood her lane.
When she came to her father’s court,
As fine as ony queen;
But when eight months were past and gane,
Got on the gown o’ green.
Then out it speaks an eldren knight,
As he stood at the yett:
‘Our king’s daughter, she gaes wi bairn,
And we’ll get a’ the wyte.’
‘O had your tongue, ye eldren man,
And bring me not to shame;
Although that I do gang wi bairn,
Yese naeways get the blame.
‘Were my love but an earthly man,
As he’s an elfin knight,
I woudna gie my ain true love
For a’ that’s in my sight.’
Then out it speaks her brither dear,
He meant to do her harm:
‘There is an herb in Charter wood
Will twine you an the bairn.’
She’s taen her mantle her about,
Her coffer by the band,
And she is on to Charter wood,
As fast as she coud gang.
She hadna poud a rose, a rose,
Nor braken a branch but ane,
Till by it came him Tam-a-Line,
Says, Ladye, lat alane.
O why pou ye the pile, Margaret,
The pile o the gravil green,
For to destroy the bonny bairn
That we got us between?
O why pou ye the pile, Margaret,
The pile o the gravil gray,
For to destroy the bonny bairn
That we got in our play?
For if it be a knave-bairn,
He’s heir o a’ my land;
But if it be a lass-bairn,
In red gowd she shall gang.
‘If my luve were an earthly man,
As he’s an elfin rae,
I coud gang bound, love, for your sake,
A twalmonth and a day.’
‘Indeed your love’s an earthly man,
The same as well as thee,
And lang I’ve haunted Charter woods,
A’ for your fair bodie.’
‘O tell me, tell me, Tam-a-Line,
O tell, an tell me true,
Tell me this night, an mak nae lie,
What pedigree are you?’
‘O I hae been at gude church-door,
An I’ve got christendom;
I’m the Earl o’ Forbes’ eldest son,
An heir ower a’ his land.
‘When I was young, o three years old,
Muckle was made o me;
My step-mother put on my claithes,
An ill, ill sained she me.
‘Ae fatal morning I went out,
Dreading nae injury,
And thinking lang, fell soun asleep,
Beneath an apple tree.
‘Then by it came the Elfin Queen,
And laid her hand on me;
And from that time since ever I mind,
I’ve been in her companie.
‘O Elfin it’s a bonny place,
In it fain woud I dwell;
But ay at ilka seven years’ end
They pay a tiend to hell,
And I’m sae fou o flesh an blude,
I’m sair feard for mysell.’
‘O tell me, tell me, Tam-a-Line,
O tell, an tell me true;
Tell me this night, an mak nae lie,
What way I’ll borrow you?’
‘The morn is Halloweven night,
The elfin court will ride,
Through England, and thro a’ Scotland,
And through the world wide.
‘O they begin at sky setting,
Rides a’ the evening tide;
And she that will her true-love borrow,
[At] Miles-corse will him bide.
‘Ye’ll do you down to Miles-corse,
Between twall hours and ane,
And full your hands o holy water,
And cast your compass roun.
‘Then the first an court that comes you till
Is published king and queen;
The next an court that comes you till,
It is maidens mony ane.
‘The next an court that comes you till
Is footmen, grooms and squires;
The next an court that comes you till
Is knights, and I’ll be there.
‘I Tam-a-Line, on milk-white steed,
A goud star on my crown;
Because I was an earthly knight,
Got that for a renown.
‘And out at my steed’s right nostril,
He’ll breathe a fiery flame;
Ye’ll loot you low, and sain yoursel,
And ye’ll be busy then.
‘Ye’ll take my horse then by the head,
And lat the bridal fa;
The Queen o’ Elfin she’ll cry out,
True Tam-a-Line’s awa.
‘Then I’ll appear in your arms
Like the wolf that neer woud tame;
Ye’ll had me fast, lat me not go,
Case we neer meet again.
‘Then I’ll appear in your arms
Like the fire that burns sae bauld;
Ye’ll had me fast, lat me not go,
I’ll be as iron cauld.
‘Then I’ll appear in your arms
Like the adder an the snake;
Ye’ll had me fast, lat me not go,
I am your warld’s make.
‘Then I’ll appear in your arms
Like to the deer sae wild;
Ye’ll had me fast, lat me not go,
And I’ll father your child.
‘And I’ll appear in your arms
Like to a silken string;
Ye’ll had me fast, lat me not go,
Till ye see the fair morning.
‘And I’ll appear in your arms
Like to a naked man;
Ye’ll had me fast, lat me not go,
And wi you I’ll gae hame.’
Then she has done her to Miles-corse,
Between twall hours an ane,
And filled her hands o holy water,
And kiest her compass roun.
The first an court that came her till
Was published king and queen;
The niest an court that came her till
Was maidens mony ane.
The niest an court that came her till
Was footmen, grooms and squires;
The niest an court that came her till
Was knights, and he was there.
True Tam-a-Line, on milk-white steed,
A gowd star on his crown;
Because he was an earthly man,
Got that for a renown.
And out at the steed’s right nostril,
He breathd a fiery flame;
She loots her low, an sains hersell,
And she was busy then.
She’s taen the horse then by the head,
And loot the bridle fa;
The Queen o Elfin she cried out,
‘True Tam-a-Line’s awa.’
‘Stay still, true Tam-a-Line,’ she says,
‘Till I pay you your fee:’
‘His father wants not lands nor rents,
He’ll ask nae fee frae thee.’
‘Gin I had kent yestreen, yestreen,
What I ken weel the day,
I shoud taen your fu fause heart,
Gien you a heart o clay.’
Then he appeared in her arms
Like the wolf that neer woud tame;
She held him fast, let him not go,
Case they neer meet again.
Then he appeared in her arms
Like the fire burning bauld;
She held him fast, let him not go,
He was as iron cauld.
And he appeared in her arms
Like the adder an the snake;
She held him fast, let him not go,
He was her warld’s make.
And he appeared in her arms
Like to the deer sae wild;
She held him fast, let him not go,
He’s father o her child.
And he appeared in her arms
Like to a silken string;
She held him fast, let him not go,
Till she saw fair morning.
And he appeared in her arms
Like to a naked man;
She held him fast, let him not go,
And wi her he’s gane hame.
These news hae reachd thro a’ Scotland,
And far ayont the Tay,
That Lady Margaret, our king’s daughter,
That night had gaind her prey.
She borrowed her love at mirk midnight,
Bare her young son ere day,
And though ye’d search the warld wide,
Ye’ll nae find sic a may.

H[edit]

I FORBID ye, maidens a’,
That wears gowd in your hair,
To come or gang by Carterhaugh,
For young Tam Lane is there.
I forbid ye, maidens a’,
That wears gowd in your green,
To come or gang by Carterhaugh,
For fear of young Tam Lane.
‘Go saddle for me the black,’ says Janet,
‘Go saddle for me the brown,
And I’ll away to Carterhaugh,
And flower mysell the gown.
‘Go saddle for me the brown,’ says Janet,
‘Go saddle for me the black,
And I’ll away to Carterhaugh,
And flower mysel a hat.’
* * * * *
She had not pulld a flowr, a flowr,
A flower but only three,
Till up there startit young Tam Lane,
Just at bird Janet’s knee.
‘Why pullst thou the herb, Janet,
And why breaks thou the tree?
Why put you back the bonny babe
That’s between you and me?’
‘If my child was to an earthly man,
As it is to a wild buck rae,
I would wake him the length of the winter’s night,
And the lea lang simmer’s day.’
‘The night is Halloween, Janet,
When our gude neighbours will ride,
And them that would their true-love won
At Blackning Cross maun bide.
‘Many will the black ride by,
And many will the brown,
But I ride on a milk-white steed,
And ride nearest the town:
Because I was a christened knight
They gie me that renown.
‘Many will the black ride by,
But far mae will the brown;
But when ye see the milk-white stead,
Grip fast and pull me down.
‘Take me in yer arms, Janet,
An ask, an adder lang;
The grip ye get ye maun haud fast,
I’ll be father to your bairn.
‘Take me in your arms, Janet,
An adder and a snake;
The grip ye get ye maun haud fast,
I’ll be your warld’s make.’
* * * * *
Up bespak the Queen of Fairies,
She spak baith loud and high:
‘Had I kend the day at noon
Tam Lane had been won from me,
‘I wad hae taen out his heart o flesh,
Put in a heart o tree,
That a’ the maids o Middle Middle Mist
Should neer hae taen Tam Lane frae me.’
Up bespack the Queen of Fairies,
And she spak wi a loud yell:
‘Aye at every seven year’s end
We pay the kane to hell.
And the koors they hae gane round about,
And I fear it will be mysel.’

I[edit]

‘O I FORBID ye, maidens a’,
That wear gowd on your hair,
To come or gae by Carterhaugh,
For young Tamlane is there.
‘There’s nane that gaes by Carterhaugh
But maun leave him a wad,
Either gowd rings, or green mantles,
Or else their maidenheid.
‘Now gowd rings ye may buy, maidens,
Green mantles ye may spin,
But, gin ye lose your maidenheid,
Ye’ll neer get that agen.’
But up then spak her, fair Janet,
The fairest o a’ her kin:
‘I’ll cum and gang to Carterhaugh,
And ask nae leave o him.’
Janet has kilted her green kirtle
A little abune her knee,
And she has braided her yellow hair
A little abune her bree.
And when she came to Carterhaugh,
She gaed beside the well,
And there she fand his steed standing,
But away was himsell.
She hadna pu’d a red red rose,
A rose but barely three,
Till up and starts a wee wee man,
At lady Janet’s knee.
Says, Why pu ye the rose, Janet?
What gars ye break the tree?
Or why come ye to Carterhaugh,
Withouten leave o me?
Says, Carterhaugh it is mine ain,
My daddie gave it me;
I’ll come and gang to Carterhaugh,
And ask nae leave o thee.
He’s taen her by the milk-white hand,
Among the leaves sae green,
And what they did I cannot tell,
The green leaves were between.
He’s taen her by the milk-white hand,
Among the roses red,
And what they did I cannot say,
She neer returnd a maid.
When she cam to her father’s ha,
She looked pale and wan;
They thought she’d dreed some sair sickness,
Or been with some leman.
She didna comb her yellow hair
Nor make meikle o her head,
And ilka thing that lady took
Was like to be her deid.
It’s four and twenty ladies fair
Were playing at the ba;
Janet, the wightest of them anes,
Was faintest o them a’.
Four and twenty ladies fair
Were playing at the chess;
And out there came the fair Janet,
As green as any grass.
Out and spak an auld grey-headed knight,
Lay oer the castle wa:
‘And ever, alas! for thee, Janet,
But we’ll be blamed a’!’
‘Now haud your tongue, ye auld grey knight,
And an ill deid may ye die!
Father my bairn on whom I will,
I’ll father nane on thee.’
Out then spak her father dear,
And he spak meik and mild:
‘And ever, alas! my sweet Janet,
I fear ye gae with child.’
‘And if I be with child, father,
Mysell maun bear the blame;
There’s neer a knight about your ha
Shall hae the bairnie’s name.
‘And if I be with child, father,
’Twill prove a wondrous birth,
For weel I swear I’m not wi bairn
To any man on earth.
‘If my love were an earthly knight,
As he’s an elfin grey,
I wadna gie my ain true love
For nae lord that ye hae.’
She prinkd hersell and prinnd hersell,
By the ae light of the moon,
And she’s away to Carterhaugh,
To speak wi young Tamlane.
And when she cam to Carterhaugh,
She gaed beside the well,
And there she saw the steed standing,
But away was himsell.
She hadna pu’d double rose,
A rose but only twae,
When up and started young Tamlane,
Says, Lady, thou pu’s nae mae.
Why pu ye the rose, Janet,
Within this garden grene,
And a’ to kill the bonny babe
That we got us between?
‘The truth ye’ll tell to me, Tamlane,
A word ye mauna lie;
Gin eer ye was in haly chapel,
Or sained in Christentie?’
‘The truth I’ll tell to thee, Janet,
A word I winna lie;
A knight me got, and a lady me bore,
As well as they did thee.
‘Randolph, Earl Murray, was my sire,
Dunbar, Earl March, is thine;
We loved when we were children small,
Which yet you well may mind.
‘When I was a boy just turnd of nine,
My uncle sent for me,
To hunt and hauk, and ride with him,
And keep him companie.
‘There came a wind out of the north,
A sharp wind and a snell,
And a deep sleep came over me,
And frae my horse I fell.
‘The Queen of Fairies keppit me
In yon green hill to dwell,
And I’m a fairy, lyth and limb,
Fair ladye, view me well.
‘Then would I never tire, Janet,
In Elfish land to dwell,
But aye, at every seven years,
They pay the teind to hell;
And I am sae fat and fair of flesh,
I fear ’twill be mysell.
‘This night is Halloween, Janet,
The morn is Hallowday,
And gin ye dare your true love win,
Ye hae nae time to stay.
‘The night it is good Halloween,
When fairy folk will ride,
And they that wad their true-love win,
At Miles Cross they maun bide.’
‘But how shall I thee ken, Tamlane?
Or how shall I thee knaw,
Amang so many unearthly knights,
The like I never saw?’
‘The first company that passes by,
Say na, and let them gae;
The next company that passes by,
Say na, and do right sae;
The third company that passes by,
Then I’ll be ane o thae.
‘First let pass the black, Janet,
And syne let pass the brown,
But grip ye to the milk-white steed,
And pu the rider down.
‘For I ride on the milk-white steed,
And aye nearest the town;
Because I was a christend knight,
They gave me that renown.
‘My right hand will be gloved, Janet,
My left hand will be bare;
And these the tokens I gie thee,
Nae doubt I will be there.
‘They’ll turn me in your arms, Janet,
An adder and a snake;
But had me fast, let me not pass,
Gin ye wad be my maik.
‘They’ll turn me in your arms, Janet,
An adder and an ask;
They’ll turn me in your arms, Janet,
A bale that burns fast.
‘They’ll turn me in your arms, Janet,
A red-hot gad o airn;
But haud me fast, let me not pass,
For I’ll do you no harm.
‘First dip me in a stand o milk,
And then in a stand o water;
But had me fast, let me not pass,
I’ll be your bairn’s father.
‘And next they’ll shape me in your arms
A tod but and an eel;
But had me fast, nor let me gang,
As you do love me weel.
‘They’ll shape me in your arms, Janet,
A dove but and a swan,
And last they’ll shape me in your arms
A mother-naked man;
Cast your green mantle over me,
I’ll be myself again.’
Gloomy, gloomy, was the night,
And eiry was the way,
As fair Janet, in her green mantle,
To Miles Cross she did gae.
About the dead hour o the night
She heard the bridles ring,
And Janet was as glad o that
As any earthly thing.
And first gaed by the black black steed,
And then gaed by the brown;
But fast she gript the milk-white steed,
And pu’d the rider down.
She pu’d him frae the milk-white steed,
And loot the bridle fa,
And up there raise an erlish cry,
‘He’s won amang us a’!’
They shaped him in fair Janet’s arms
An esk but and an adder;
She held him fast in every shape,
To be her bairn’s father.
They shaped him in her arms at last
A mother-naked man,
She wrapt him in her green mantle,
And sae her true love wan.
Up then spake the Queen o Fairies,
Out o a bush o broom:
‘She that has borrowd young Tamlane
Has gotten a stately groom.’
Up then spake the Queen o Fairies,
Out o a bush o rye:
‘She’s taen awa the bonniest knight
In a’ my cumpanie.
‘But had I kennd, Tamlane,’ she says,
‘A lady wad borrowd thee
I wad taen out thy twa grey een,
Put in twa een o tree.
‘Had I but kennd, Tamlane,’ she says,
‘Before ye came frae hame,
I wad taen out your heart o flesh,
Put in a heart o stane.
‘Had I but had the wit yestreen
That I hae coft the day,
I’d paid my kane seven times to hell
Ere you’d been won away.’

J[edit]

‘The night, the night is Halloween,
Tommorow’s Hallowday,
 . . . . . .
. . . . . .
‘The night, the night is Halloween,
Our seely court maun ride,
Thro England and thro Ireland both,
And a’ the warld wide.
* * * * *
‘The firsten court that comes ye bye,
You’ll lout, and let them gae;
The seconden court that comes you bye,
You’ll hail them reverently.
‘The thirden court that comes you by,
Sae weel’s ye will me ken,
For some will be on a black, a black,
And some will be on a brown,
But I will be on a bluid-red steed,
And will ride neist the queen.
‘The thirden court that comes you bye,
Sae weel’s ye will me ken,
For I’ll be on a bluid-red steed,
Wi three stars on his crown.
‘Ye’ll tak the horse head in yer hand,
And grip the bridle fast;
The Queen o Elfin will gie a cry,
‘True Tamas is stown awa!’
‘And I will grow in your twa hands
And adder and an eel;
But the grip ye get ye’ll hold it fast,
I’ll be father to yer chiel.
‘I will wax in your twa hans
As hot as any coal;
But if you love me as you say,
You’ll think of me and thole.
‘O I will grow in your twa hands
An adder and a snake;
The grip ye get now hold it fast,
And I’ll be your world’s mait.
‘O I’ll gae in at your gown sleeve,
And out at your gown hem,
And I’ll stand up before thee then
A freely naked man.
‘O I’ll gae in at your gown sleeve,
And out at your gown hem,
And I’ll stand before you then,
But claithing I’ll hae nane.
‘Ye’ll do you down to Carden’s Ha,
And down to Carden’s stream,
And there you’ll see our seely court,
As they come riding hame.’
* * * * *
‘It’s nae wonder, my daughter Janet,
Ture Tammas ye thought on;
An he were a woman as he’s a man,
My bedfellow he should be.’

J2[edit]

The maid that sits in Katherine’s Hall,
Clad in her robes so black,
She has to yon garden gone,
For flowers to flower her hat.
She had not pulled the red, red rose,
A double rose but three,
When up there starts a gentleman,
Just at this lady’s knee.
Says, Who’s this pulls the red, red rose?
Breaks branches off the tree?
Or who’s this treads my garden-grass,
Without the leave of me?
‘Yes, I will pull the red, red rose,
Break branches off the tree,
This garden in Moorcartney wood,
Without the leave o thee.’
He took her by the milk-white hand
And gently laid her down,
Just in below some shady trees
Where the green leaves hung down.
‘Come tell to me, kind sir,’ she said,
‘What before you never told;
Are you an earthly man?’ said she,
‘A knight or a baron bold?’
‘I’ll tell to you, fair lady,’ he said,
‘What before I neer did tell;
I’m Earl Douglas’s second son,
With the queen of the fairies I dwell.
‘When riding through yon forest-wood,
And by yon grass-green well,
A sudden sleep me overtook,
And off my steed I fell.
Ther queen of the fairies, being there,
Made me with her to dwell,
And still once in the seven years
We pay a teind to hell.
‘And because I am an earthly man,
Myself doth greatly fear,
For the cleverest man in all our train
To Pluto must go this year.
‘This night is Halloween, lady,
And the fairies they will ride;
The maid that will her true-love win
At Miles Cross she may bide.’
‘But how shall I thee ken, though, sir?
Or how shall I thee know,
Amang a pack o hellish wraiths,
Before I never saw?’
‘Some rides upon a black horse, lady,
And some upon a brown,
But I myself on a milk-white steed,
And I aye nearest the toun.
‘My right hand shall be covered, lady,
My left hand shall be bare,
And that’s a token good enough
That you will find me there.
‘Take the Bible in your right hand,
With God for to be your guide,
Take holy water in thy left hand,
And throw it on every side.’
She’s taen her mantle her about,
A cane into her hand,
And she has unto Miles Cross gone,
As hard as she can gang.
First she has letten the black pass by,
And then she has letten the brown,
But she’s taen a fast hold o the milk-white steed,
And she’s pulled Earl Thomas doun.
The queen of the fairies being there,
Sae loud she’s letten a cry,
‘The maid that sits in Katherine’s Hall
This night has gotten her prey.
‘But hadst thou waited, fair lady,
Till about this time the morn,
He would hae been as far from thee or me
As the wind that blew when he was born.’
They turned him in this lady’s arms
Like the adder and the snake;
She held him fast; why should she not?
Though her poor heart was like to break.
They turned him in this lady’s arms
Like two red gads of airn;
She held him fast; why should she not?
She knew they could do her no harm.
They turned him in this lady’s arms
Like to all things that was vile;
She held him fast; why should she not?
The father of her child.
They turned him in this lady’s arms
Like to a naked knight;
She’s taen him hame to her ain bower,
And clothed him in armour bright.

K[edit]

Leady Margat stands in her boor-door,
Clead in the robs of green;
She longed to go to Charters Woods,
To pull the flowers her lean.
She had not puld a rose, a rose,
O not a rose but one,
Till up it starts True Thomas,
Said, Leady, let alone.
‘Why pull ye the rose, Marget?
Or why break ye the tree?
Or why come ye to Charters Woods
Without the leave of me?’
‘I will pull the rose,’ she said,
‘And I will break the tree,
For Charters Woods is all my own,
And I’l ask no leave of the.’
He’s tean her by the milk-white hand,
And by the grass-green sleeve,
And laid her lo at the foot of the tree,
At her he askt no leave.
It fell once upon a day
They wer a pleaying at the ba,
And every one was reed and whyte,
Leady Marget’s culler was all awa.
Out it speaks an elder man,
As he stood in the gate,
‘Our king’s daughter she gos we bern,
And we will get the wait.’
‘If I be we bern,’ she said,
‘My own self beer the blame!
There is not a man in my father’s court
Will get my bern’s name.’
‘There grows a flower in Charters Woods,
It grows on gravel greay,
It ould destroy the boney young bern
That ye got in your pley.’
She’s tean her mantle her about,
Her green glove on her hand,
And she’s awa to Charters Woods,
As fest as she could gang.
She had no puld a pile, a pile,
O not a pile but one,
Up it startid True Thomas,
Said, Leady, lat alean.
Why pull ye the pile, Marget,
That grows on gravel green,
For to destroy the boney young bern
That we got us between?’
‘If it were to an earthly man,
As [it is] to an elphan knight,
I ould walk for my true-love’s sake
All the long winter’s night.’
‘When I was a boy of eleven years old,
And much was made of me,
I went out to my father’s garden,
Fell asleep at yon aple tree:
The queen of Elphan [she] came by,
And laid on her hands on me.
‘Elphan it’s a boney place,
In it fain wid I dwall;
But ey at every seven years end
We pay the teene to hell:
I’m so full of flesh and blood
I’m sear feart for mysel.
‘The morn’s Hallow Even’s night,
When a’ our courts do ride,
Through England and through Irland,
Through a’ the world wide:
And she that would her true-love borrow
At Miles Corse she may bide.
‘The first an court that ye come till,
Ye let them a’ pass by;
The next an court that ye come till,
Ye hile them reverendly.
‘The next an court the ye come till,
An therein rides the queen,
Me upon a milk-whyte steed,
And a gold star in my croun;
Because I am a erle’s soon,
I get that for my renoun.
‘Ye take me in your armes,
Give me a right sear fa;
The queen of Elphan she’l cry out,
True Thomas is awa!
‘First I’l be in your armes
The fire burning so bold;
Ye hold me fast, let me no pass
Till I be like iron cold.
‘Next I’l be in your armes
The fire burning so wild;
Ye hold me fast, let me no pass,
I’m the father of your child.’
The first court that came her till,
She let them a’ pass by;
The nex an court that came her till,
She helt them reverendly.
The nex an court that came her till,
And therein read the queen,
True Thomas on a milk-whyte steed,
A gold star in his croun;
Because he was a earl’s soon,
He got that for his renoun.
She’s tean him in her arms,
Geen him a right sore fa;
The queen of Elphan she cried out,
True Thomas is awa!
He was into her arms
The fire burning so bold;
She held him fast, let him no pass
Till he was like iron cold.
He was into her arms
The fire burning so wild;
She held him fast, let him no pass,
He was the father of her child.
The queen of Elphan she cried out,
An angry woman was she,
‘Let Leady Marget an her true-love be,
She’s bought him dearer than me.’

L[edit]

I charge ye, a’ ye ladies fair,
That wear goud in your hair,
To come an gang bye Carterhaugh,
For young Tam Lien is there.
* * * * *
Then Janet kiltit her green cleadin
A wee aboon her knee,
An she’s gane away to Carterhaugh,
As fast as she can dree.
When Janet cam to Carterhaugh,
Tam Lien was at the wall,
An there he left his steed stannin,
But away he gaed his sell.
She had na pu’d a red, red rose,
A rose but only thre,
Till up then startit young Tam Lien,
Just at young Jenet’s knee.
‘What gars ye pu the rose, Janet,
Briek branches frae the tree,
An come an gang by Carterhaugh,
An speir nae leave of me?’
‘What need I speir leave o thee, Tam?
What need I speir leave o thee,
When Carterhaugh is a’ mine ain,
My father gae it me?’
* * * * *
She’s kiltit up her green cleadin
A wee aboon her knee,
An she’s away to her ain bower-door,
As fast as she can dree.
* * * * *
There war four-an-twentie fair ladies
A’ dancin in a chess,
An some war blue an some war green,
But Janet was like the gress.
There war four-an-twentie fair ladies
A’ playin at the ba,
An some war red an som wer white,
But Jennet was like the snaw.

M[edit]

My father was a noble knight,
And was much gi’n to play,
And I myself a bonny boy,
And followed him away.
He rowd me in his hunting-coat
And layd me down to sleep,
And by the queen of fairies came,
And took me up to keep.
She set me on a milk-whtie steed;
’Twas o the elfin kind;
His feet were shot wi beaten goud,
And fleeter than the wind.
Then we raid on and on’ard mair,
Oer mountain, hill and lee,
Till we came to a hie, hie wa,
Upon a mountain’s bree.
The apples hung like stars of goud
Out-our that wa sa fine;
I put my hand to pu down ane,
For want of food I thought to tine.
‘O had your hand, Tamas!’ she said,
‘O let that evil fruit now be!
It was that apple ye see there
Beguil’d man and woman in your country.
‘O dinna ye see yon road, Tamas,
Down by yon lilie lee?
Blessd is the man who yon gate gaes,
It leads him to the heavens hie.
‘And dinna ye see yon road, Tamas,
Down by yon frosty fell?
Curst is the man that yon gate gaes,
For it leads to the gates of hell.
‘O dinna ye see yon castle, Tamas,
That’s biggit between the twa,
And theekit wi the beaten goud?
O that’s the fairies’ ha.
‘O when ye come to the ha, Tamas,
See that a weel-learnd boy ye be;
They’ll ask ye questions ane and a’,
But see ye answer nane but me.
‘If ye speak to ain but me, Tamas,
A fairie ye maun ever bide;
But if ye speak to nane but me, Tamas,
Ye may come to be your country’s pride.’
And when he came to Fairie Ha,
I wot a weel-learnd boy was he;
They askd him questions ane and a’,
But he answerd nane but his ladie.
There was four-and-twenty gude knights’-sons
In fairie land obliged to bide,
And of a’ the pages that were there
Fair Tamas was his ladie’s pride.
There was four-and-twenty earthly boys,
Wha all played at the ba,
But Tamas was the bonniest boy,
And playd the best amang them a’.
There was four-and-twenty earthly maids,
Wha a’ playd at the chess,
Their colour rosy-red and white,
Their gowns were green as grass.
‘And pleasant are our fairie sports,
We flie o’er hill and dale;
But at the end of seven years
They pay the teen to hell.
‘And now’s the time, at Hallowmess,
Late on the morrow’s even,
And if ye miss me then, Janet,
I’m lost for yearis seven.’

N[edit]

'Gowd rings I can buy, Thomas,
Green mantles I can spin,
But gin ye take my maidenheid
I’ll neer get that again.'
Out and spak the queen o fairies,
Out o a shot o wheat,
'She that has gotten young Tamlane
Has gotten my heart’s delight.'