Curtis's Botanical Magazine/Volume 38/1581

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search

[ 1581 ]


Dryandra floribunda. Many-Flowered
Dryandra.
 ***************

Class and Order.

Tetandria Monogynia.

Generic Character.

Cor. 1-petala. Stam. apicibus concavis corollæ immersa.
Squamulæ hypogynæ 4. Folliculus. ligneus, 2-locularis: loculis
1-spermis: dissepimento libero, bifido. Recept. commune planum,
involucro imbricato. Brown.

Specific Character and Synonyms.

DRYANDRA floribunda; foliis cuneiformibus inciso-dentatis
spinulosis sessilibus, ramis pilosis.
DRYANDRA floribunda; foliis cuneiformibus inciso-serratis,
involucri bracteis: exterioribus glabriusculis, pe-
rianthis laminis glabris, stigmate subclavato obtuso. Brown
Prod. Nov. Holl. p. 397. Linn. Trans. v 10. p. 212.
DRYANDRA floribunda; foliis cuneiformibus inciso-serratis,
involucri bracteis: exterioribus glabriusculis, pe-
rianthis laminis glabris, stigmate subclavato obtuso. Hort. Kew. ed. alt.
v. 1. p, 219.
JOSEPHIA sessilis. Knight et Salisb. Prot. 110.





Botanical Magazine 1581 Dryandra floribunda.jpeg


The name of floribunda. given by Mr. Brown to this species,
may allude to the number of flowers which appear at the same
time from the extremities of numerous branches, for no more
than one are produced fromthe same point, nor are the florets in
each flower, equal in number or splendour to that of many other
species; or to its continuing to flower for so long a period.

Mr. Brown follows Jussieu in considering the proteaceæ as having no corolla, designating the part so called by Linnæus, by
the term of calyx, in his first publication, changed in his Pro-
dromus to that of perianthum. In composing Hortus
Kewensis,
--
Kewensis, it sometimes became necessary to alter the language
of his characters to adapt it to that of Linnæus, every where
used in that work. In doing this in the present instance, Mr.
Dryander has committed an oversight, which
occasioned us some trouble in determining whether our plant
belonged to floribunda or cuneata; the author having described
the laminæ of the corolla; whereas by lamina Mr. Brown meant
only the expanded part at the apex, into which the anther is
immersed, considering the long narrow part of the unguis; which,
so far from being smooth is very thickly bearded.

We have thought it better to omit this part of the character al-
together, the sessile being alone sufficient to distinguish it
from cuneata.

Native of the south coast of New Holland, commonly called
Lewin's Land, the only country which has hitherto known
to produce any species of Dryandra, where it affects low
rocky situations.

Communicated from the Nursery of Messrs. Malcolm and
Sweet, on Stockwell Common.

Flowers most part of the year. Introduced in 1803, by
Mr. Peter Good.