Des Granges, David (DNB00)

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DES GRANGES, DAVID (fl. 1625–1675), miniature-painter, was probably a Frenchman, and seems to have been originally an engraver. In 1628 he engraved a plate from the picture of St. George by Raphael, now in the Hermitage at St. Petersburg, but then in the collection of William Herbert, earl of Pembroke, to whom the engraving was dedicated. His name also appears on frontispieces of that time. He seems soon to have turned his hand to miniature painting, as there is a miniature of a lady in the royal collection at Windsor, dated 1639, a copy of Titian's ‘D'Avalos and his mistress’ at Ham House, dated 1640, and a miniature of Inigo Jones in the collection of the Duke of Portland, dated 1641. One of Charles I is at Hardwick House, Bury St. Edmund's. His miniatures are always signed with his initials, D. D. G. In 1651, when Charles II was on his fruitless campaign in Scotland, Des Granges attended him, as limner, and while at St. Johnstone's (where he fell sick) painted several miniatures of Charles, which were distributed among the nobles and other adherents to the royal cause. In 1671 he petitioned Charles for payment of the sums remaining due to him for these services, and his petition seems to have been successful. He describes himself as old and infirm, with failing sight and helpless children, and it is probable that he did not survive very long. Miniatures by Des Granges were exhibited at Manchester in 1857, at the Loan Exhibition, South Kensington, in 1862, and the Exhibition of Miniatures at South Kensington in 1865. At the last-named there were miniatures of Sir Thomas Bodley, Madame de Maintenon (1656), and Catherine of Braganza. Others are in the collections at Windsor Castle, Ham House, Madresfield Court, Wroxton Abbey, &c. His signature has sometimes been ignorantly ascribed to the dwarf Gibson. Sanderson in his ‘Graphice’ (1658) mentions Des Granges among the painters from the life then living, and classes him with Walker, Wright, Lely, and others as ‘rare artizans.’

[Fine Arts Quarterly Review, new ser. i. 446, ii. 218; information from G. Scharf, C.B., F.S.A.; Passavant's Rafael.]

L. C.