Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)/E-I

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

E[edit]

“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eagle.

Eagle

  • Eagle (Herb. nesher; properly the griffon vulture or great vulture, so called from its tearing its prey with its beak), referred to for its swiftness of flight (Deut. 28:49; 2 Sam. 1:23), its mounting high in the air (Job 39:27), its strength (Ps. 103:5), its setting its nest in high places (Jer. 49:16), and its power of vision (Job 39:27-30).

This "ravenous bird" is a symbol of those nations whom God employs and sends forth to do a work of destruction, sweeping away whatever is decaying and putrescent (Matt. 24:28; Isa. 46:11; Ezek. 39:4; Deut. 28:49; Jer. 4:13; 48:40). It is said that the eagle sheds his feathers in the beginning of spring, and with fresh plumage assumes the appearance of youth. To this, allusion is made in Ps. 103:5 and Isa. 40:31. God's care over his people is likened to that of the eagle in training its young to fly (Ex. 19:4; Deut. 32:11, 12). An interesting illustration is thus recorded by Sir Humphry Davy:, "I once saw a very interesting sight above the crags of Ben Nevis. Two parent eagles were teaching their offspring, two young birds, the maneuvers of flight. They began by rising from the top of the mountain in the eye of the sun. It was about mid-day, and bright for the climate. They at first made small circles, and the young birds imitated them. They paused on their wings, waiting till they had made their flight, and then took a second and larger gyration, always rising toward the sun, and enlarging their circle of flight so as to make a gradually ascending spiral. The young ones still and slowly followed, apparently flying better as they mounted; and they continued this sublime exercise, always rising till they became mere points in the air, and the young ones were lost, and afterwards their parents, to our aching sight." (See Isa. 40:31.)

There have been observed in Palestine four distinct species of eagles, (1) the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos); (2) the spotted eagle (Aquila naevia); (3) the common species, the imperial eagle (Aquila heliaca); and (4) the Circaetos gallicus, which preys on reptiles. The eagle was unclean by the Levitical law (Lev. 11:13; Deut. 14:12).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ear.

Ear

  • Ear Used frequently in a figurative sense (Ps. 34:15). To "uncover the ear" is to show respect to a person (1 Sam. 20:2 marg.). To have the "ear heavy", or to have "uncircumcised ears" (Isa. 6:10), is to be inattentive and disobedient. To have the ear "bored" through with an awl was a sign of perpetual servitude (Ex. 21:6).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Earing.

Earing

  • Earing An Old English word (from the Latin aro, I plough), meaning "ploughing." It is used in the Authorized Version in Gen. 45:6; Ex. 34:21; 1 Sam. 8:12; Deut. 21:4; Isa. 30:24; but the Revised Version has rendered the original in these places by the ordinary word to plough or till.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Earnest.

Earnest

  • Earnest The Spirit is the earnest of the believer's destined inheritance (2 Cor. 1:22; 5:5; Eph. 1:14). The word thus rendered is the same as that rendered "pledge" in Gen. 38:17-20; "indeed, the Hebrew word has simply passed into the Greek and Latin languages, probably through commercial dealings with the Phoenicians, the great trading people of ancient days. Originally it meant no more than a pledge; but in common usage it came to denote that particular kind of pledge which is a part of the full price of an article paid in advance; and as it is joined with the figure of a seal when applied to the Spirit, it seems to be used by Paul in this specific sense." The Spirit's gracious presence and working in believers is a foretaste to them of the blessedness of heaven. God is graciously pleased to give not only pledges but foretastes of future blessedness.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Earrings.

Earrings

  • Earrings Rings properly for the ear (Gen. 35:4; Num. 31:50; Ezek. 16:12). In Gen. 24:47 the word means a nose-jewel, and is so rendered in the Revised Version. In Isa. 3:20 the Authorized Version has "ear-rings," and the Revised Version "amulets," which more correctly represents the original word (lehashim), which means incantations; charms, thus remedies against enchantment, worn either suspended from the neck or in the ears of females. Ear-rings were ornaments used by both sexes (Ex. 32:2).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Earth.

Earth

  • Earth (1.) In the sense of soil or ground, the translation of the word adamah'. In Gen. 9:20 "husbandman" is literally "man of the ground or earth." Altars were to be built of earth (Ex. 20:24). Naaman asked for two mules' burden of earth (2 Kings 5:17), under the superstitious notion that Jehovah, like the gods of the heathen, could be acceptably worshipped only on his own soil.

(2). As the rendering of 'erets, it means the whole world (Gen. 1:2); the land as opposed to the sea (1:10). Erets also denotes a country (21:32); a plot of ground (23:15); the ground on which a man stands (33:3); the inhabitants of the earth (6:1; 11:1); all the world except Israel (2 Chr. 13:9). In the New Testament "the earth" denotes the land of Judea (Matt. 23:35); also things carnal in contrast with things heavenly (John 3:31; Col. 3:1, 2).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Earthquake.

Earthquake

  • Earthquake Mentioned among the extraordinary phenomena of Palestine (Ps. 18:7; comp. Hab. 3:6; Nah. 1:5; Isa. 5:25).

The first earthquake in Palestine of which we have any record happened in the reign of Ahab (1 Kings 19:11, 12). Another took place in the days of Uzziah, King of Judah (Zech. 14:5). The most memorable earthquake taking place in New Testament times happened at the crucifixion of our Lord (Matt. 27:54). An earthquake at Philippi shook the prison in which Paul and Silas were imprisoned (Act 16:26).

It is used figuratively as a token of the presence of the Lord (Judg. 5:4; 2 Sam. 22:8; Ps. 77:18; 97:4; 104:32).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at East.

East

  • East (1.) The orient (mizrah); the rising of the sun. Thus "the east country" is the country lying to the east of Syria, the Elymais (Zech. 8:7).

(2). Properly what is in front of one, or a country that is before or in front of another; the rendering of the word kedem. In pointing out the quarters, a Hebrew always looked with his face toward the east. The word kedem is used when the four quarters of the world are described (Gen. 13:14; 28:14); and mizrah when the east only is distinguished from the west (Josh. 11:3; Ps. 50:1; 103:12, etc.). In Gen. 25:6 "eastward" is literally "unto the land of kedem;" i.e., the lands lying east of Palestine, namely, Arabia, Mesopotamia, etc.


East, Children of the

“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Easter.


  • East, Children of the The Arabs as a whole, known as the Nabateans or Kedarenes, nomad tribes (Judg. 6:3, 33; 7:12; 8:10).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at East, Children of the.

Easter

  • Easter Originally a Saxon word (Eostre), denoting a goddess of the Saxons, in honour of whom sacrifices were offered about the time of the Passover. Hence the name came to be given to the festival of the Resurrection of Christ, which occured at the time of the Passover. In the early English versions this word was frequently used as the translation of the Greek pascha (the Passover). When the Authorized Version (1611) was formed, the word "passover" was used in all passages in which this word pascha occurred, except in Act 12:4. In the Revised Version the proper word, "passover," is always used.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at East gate.

East gate

  • East gate (Jer. 19:2), properly the Potter's gate, the gate which led to the potter's field, in the valley of Hinnom.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at East sea.

East sea

  • East sea (Joel 2:20; Ezek. 47:18), the Dead Sea, which lay on the east side of the Holy Land. The Mediterranean, which lay on the west, was hence called the "great sea for the west border" (Num. 34:6).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at East wind.

East wind

  • East wind The wind coming from the east (Job 27:21; Isa. 27:8, etc.). Blight caused by this wind, "thin ears" (Gen. 41:6); the withered "gourd" (Jonah 4: 8). It was the cause and also the emblem of evil (Ezek. 17:10; 19:12; Hos. 13:15). In Palestine this wind blows from a burning desert, and hence is destitute of moisture necessary for vegetation.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eating.

Eating

  • Eating The ancient Hebrews would not eat with the Egyptians (Gen. 43:32). In the time of our Lord they would not eat with Samaritans (John 4:9), and were astonished that he ate with publicans and sinners (Matt. 9:11). The Hebrews originally sat at table, but afterwards adopted the Persian and Chaldean practice of reclining (Luke 7:36-50). Their principal meal was at noon (Gen. 43:16; 1 Kings 20:16; Ruth 2:14; Luke 14:12). The word "eat" is used metaphorically in Jer. 15:16; Ezek. 3:1; Rev. 10:9. In John 6:53-58, "eating and drinking" means believing in Christ. Women were never present as guests at meals (q.v.).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ebal.

Ebal

  • Ebal Stony. (1.) A mountain 3,076 feet above the level of the sea, and 1,200 feet above the level of the valley, on the north side of which stood the city of Shechem (q.v.). On this mountain six of the tribes (Deut. 27:12, 13) were appointed to take their stand and respond according to a prescribed form to the imprecations uttered in the valley, where the law was read by the Levites (11:29; 29:4, 13). This mountain was also the site of the first great altar erected to Jehovah (Deut. 27:5-8; Josh. 8:30-35). After this the name of Ebal does not again occur in Jewish history. (See [169]GERIZIM.)

(2.) A descendant of Eber (1 Chr. 1:22), called also Obal (Gen. 10:28).

(3.) A descendant of Seir the Horite (Gen. 36:23).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ebed.

Ebed

  • Ebed Slave, the father of Gaal, in whom the men of Shechem "put confidence" in their conspiracy against Abimelech (Judg. 9:26, 26, 30, 31).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ebed-melech.

Ebed-melech

  • Ebed-melech A servant of the king; probably an official title, an Ethiopian, "one of the eunuchs which was in the king's house;" i.e., in the palace of Zedekiah, king of Judah. He interceded with the king in Jeremiah 's behalf, and was the means of saving him from death by famine (Jer. 38:7-13: comp. 39:15-18).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eben-ezer.

Eben-ezer

  • Eben-ezer Stone of help, the memorial stone set up by Samuel to commemorate the divine assistance to Israel in their great battle against the Philistines, whom they totally routed (1 Sam. 7:7-12) at Aphek, in the neighbourhood of Mizpeh, in Benjamin, near the western entrance of the pass of Beth-horon. On this very battle-field, twenty years before, the Philistines routed the Israelites, "and slew of the army in the field about four thousand men" (4:1, 2; here, and at 5:1, called "Eben-ezer" by anticipation). In this extremity the Israelites fetched the ark out of Shiloh and carried it into their camp. The Philistines a second time immediately attacked them, and smote them with a very great slaughter, "for there fell of Israel thirty thousand footmen. And the ark of God was taken" (1 Sam. 4:10). And now in the same place the Philistines are vanquished, and the memorial stone is erected by Samuel (q.v.). The spot where the stone was erected was somewhere "between Mizpeh and Shen." Some have identified it with the modern Beit Iksa, a conspicuous and prominent position, apparently answering all the necessary conditions; others with Dier Aban, 3 miles east of `Ain Shems.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eber.

Eber

  • Eber Beyond. (1.). The third post-duluvian patriach after Shem (Gen. 10:24; 11:14). He is regarded as the founder of the Hebrew race (10:21; Num. 24:24). In Luke 3:35 he is called Heber.

(2.) One of the seven heads of the families of the Gadites (1 Chr. 5:13).

(3.) The oldest of the three sons of Elpaal the Benjamite (8:12).

(4.) One of the heads of the familes of Benjamites in Jerusalem (22).

(5.) The head of the priestly family of Amok in the time of Zerubbabel (Neh. 12:20).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ebony.

Ebony

  • Ebony A black, hard wood, brought by the merchants from India to Tyre (Ezek. 27:15). It is the heart-wood, brought by Diospyros ebenus, which grows in Ceylon and Southern India.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ebronah.

Ebronah

  • Ebronah Passage, one of the stations of the Israelites in their wanderings (Num. 33:34, 35). It was near Ezion-geber.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ecbatana.

Ecbatana

  • Ecbatana (|Ezra 6:2 marg.). (See [170]ACHMETHA.)


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eclipse.

Eclipse

  • Eclipse Of the sun alluded to in Amos 8:9; Micah 3:6; Zech. 14:6; Joel 2:10. Eclipses were regarded as tokens of God's anger (Joel 3:15; Job 9:7). The darkness at the crucifixion has been ascribed to an eclipse (Matt. 27:45); but on the other hand it is argued that the great intensity of darkness caused by an eclipse never lasts for more than six minutes, and this darkness lasted for three hours. Moreover, at the time of the Passover the moon was full, and therefore there could not be an eclipse of the sun, which is caused by an interposition of the moon between the sun and the earth.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at ed.

Ed

  • Ed Witness, a word not found in the original Hebrew, nor in the LXX. and Vulgate, but added by the translators in the Authorized Version, also in the Revised Version, of Josh. 22:34. The words are literally rendered: "And the children of Reuben and the children of Gad named the altar. It is a witness between us that Jehovah is God." This great altar stood probably on the east side of the Jordan, in the land of Gilead, "over against the land of Canaan." After the division of the Promised Land, the tribes of Reuben and Gad and the half-tribe of Manasseh, on returning to their own settlements on the east of Jordan (Josh. 22:1-6), erected a great altar, which they affirmed, in answer to the challenge of the other tribes, was not for sacrifice, but only as a witness (`Ed) or testimony to future generations that they still retained the same interest in the nation as the other tribes.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Edar.

Edar

  • Edar Tower of the flock, a tower between Bethlehem and Hebron, near which Jacob first halted after leaving Bethlehem (Gen. 35:21). In Micah 4:8 the word is rendered "tower of the flock" (marg., "Edar"), and is used as a designation of Bethlehem, which figuratively represents the royal line of David as sprung from Bethlehem.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eden.

Eden

  • Eden Delight. (1.) The garden in which our first parents dewlt (Gen. 2:8-17). No geographical question has been so much discussed as that bearing on its site. It has been placed in Armenia, in the region west of the Caspian Sea, in Media, near Damascus, in Palestine, in Southern Arabia, and in Babylonia. The site must undoubtedly be sought for somewhere along the course of the great streams the Tigris and the Euphrates of Western Asia, in "the land of Shinar" or Babylonia. The region from about lat. 33 degrees 30' to lat. 31 degrees, which is a very rich and fertile tract, has been by the most competent authorities agreed on as the probable site of Eden. "It is a region where streams abound, where they divide and re-unite, where alone in the Mesopotamian tract can be found the phenomenon of a single river parting into four arms, each of which is or has been a river of consequence."

Among almost all nations there are traditions of the primitive innocence of our race in the garden of Eden. This was the "golden age" to which the Greeks looked back. Men then lived a "life free from care, and without labour and sorrow. Old age was unknown; the body never lost its vigour; existence was a perpetual feast without a taint of evil. The earth brought forth spontaneously all things that were good in profuse abundance."

(2.) One of the markets whence the merchants of Tyre obtained richly embroidered stuffs (Ezek. 27:23); the same, probably, as that mentioned in 2 Kings 19:12, and Isa. 37:12, as the name of a region conquered by the Assyrians.

(3.) Son of Joah, and one of the Levites who assisted in reforming the public worship of the sanctuary in the time of Hezekiah (2 Chr. 29:12).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eder.

Eder

  • Eder Flock. (1.) A city in the south of Judah, on the border of Idumea (Josh. 15:21).

(2.) The second of the three sons of Mushi, of the family of Merari, appointed to the Levitical office (1 Chr. 23:23; 24:30).



“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Edrei.

Edrei

  • Edrei Mighty; strength. (1.) One of the chief towns of the kingdom of Bashan (Josh. 12:4, 5). Here Og was defeated by the Israelites, and the strength of the Amorites broken (Num. 21:33-35). It subsequently belonged to Manasseh, for a short time apparently, and afterwards became the abode of banditti and outlaws (Josh. 13:31). It has been identified with the modern Edr'a, which stands on a rocky promontory on the south-west edge of the Lejah (the Argob of the Hebrews, and Trachonitis of the Greeks). The ruins of Edr'a are the most extensive in the Hauran. They are 3 miles in circumference. A number of the ancient houses still remain; the walls, roofs, and doors being all of stone. The wild region of which Edrei was the capital is thus described in its modern aspect: "Elevated about 20 feet above the plain, it is a labyrinth of clefts and crevasses in the rock, formed by volcanic action; and owing to its impenetrable condition, it has become a refuge for outlaws and turbulent characters, who make it a sort of Cave of Adullam...It is, in fact, an impregnable natural fortress, about 20 miles in length and 15 in breadth" (Porter's Syria, etc.). Beneath this wonderful city there is also a subterranean city, hollowed out probably as a refuge for the population of the upper city in times of danger. (See [171]BASHAN.)

(2.) A town of Naphtali (Josh. 19:37).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Effectual call.

Effectual call

  • Effectual call See [172]CALL.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Effectual prayer.

Effectual prayer

  • Effectual prayer Occurs in Authorized Version, James 5:16. The Revised Version renders appropriately: "The supplication of a righteous man availeth much in its working", i.e., "it moves the hand of Him who moves the world."


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Egg.

Egg

  • Egg (Heb.@beytsah, "whiteness"). Eggs deserted (Isa. 10:14), of a bird (Deut. 22:6), an ostrich (Job 39:14), the cockatrice (Isa. 59:5). In Luke 11:12, an egg is contrasted with a scorpion, which is said to be very like an egg in its appearance, so much so as to be with difficulty at times distinguished from it. In Job 6:6 ("the white of an egg") the word for egg (hallamuth') occurs nowhere else. It has been translated "purslain" (R.V. marg.), and the whole phrase "purslain-broth", i.e., broth made of that herb, proverbial for its insipidity; and hence an insipid discourse. Job applies this expression to the speech of Eliphaz as being insipid and dull. But the common rendering, "the white of an egg", may be satisfactorily maintained.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eglah.

Eglah

  • Eglah A heifer, one of David's wives, and mother of Ithream (2 Sam. 3:5; 1 Chr. 3:3). According to a Jewish tradition she was Michal.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eglaim.

Eglaim

  • Eglaim Two ponds, (Isa. 15:8), probably En-eglaim of Ezek. 47:10.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Eglon.

Eglon

  • Eglon The bullock; place of heifers. (1.) Chieftain or king of one of the Moabite tribes (Judg. 3:12-14). Having entered into an alliance with Ammon and Amalek, he overran the trans-Jordanic region, and then crossing the Jordan, seized on Jericho, the "city of palm trees," which had been by this time rebuilt, but not as a fortress. He made this city his capital, and kept Israel in subjection for eighteen years. The people at length "cried unto the Lord" in their distress, and he "raised them up a deliverer" in Ehud (q.v.), the son of Gera, a Benjamite.

(2.) A city in Judah, near Lachish (Josh. 15:39). It was destroyed by Joshua (10:5, 6). It has been identified with Tell Nejileh, 6 miles south of Tell Hesy or Ajlan, north-west of Lachish. (See [173]LACHISH.)


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ehud.

Ehud

  • Ehud Union. (1.) A descendant of Benjamin (1 Chr. 7:10), his great-grandson.

(2.) The son of Gera, of the tribe of Benjamin (Judg. 3:15). After the death of Othniel the people again fell into idolatry, and Eglon, the king of Moab, uniting his bands with those of the Ammonites and the Amalekites, crossed the Jordan and took the city of Jericho, and for eighteen years held that whole district in subjection, exacting from it an annual tribute. At length Ehud, by a stratagem, put Eglon to death with a two-edged dagger a cubit long, and routed the Moabites at the fords of the Jordan, putting 10,000 of them to death. Thenceforward the land, at least Benjamin, enjoyed rest "for fourscore years" (Judg. 3:12-30). (See [174]QUARRIES [2].) But in the south-west the Philistines reduced the Israelites to great straits (Judg. 5:6). From this oppression Shamgar was raised up to be their deliverer.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Ekron.

Ekron

  • Ekron Firm-rooted, the most northerly of the five towns belonging to the lords of the Philistines, about 11 miles north of Gath. It was assigned to Judah (Josh. 13:3), and afterwards to Dan (19:43), but came again into the full possession of the Philistines (1 Sam. 5:10). It was the last place to which the Philistines carried the ark before they sent it back to Israel (1 Sam. 5:10; 6:1-8). There was here a noted sanctuary of Baal-zebub (2 Kings 1: 2, 3, 6, 16). Now the small village Akir. It is mentioned on monuments in B.C. 702, when Sennacherib set free its king, imprisoned by Hezekiah in Jerusalem, according to the Assyrian record.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Elah.

Elah

  • Elah Terebinth or oak. (1.) Valley of, where the Israelites were encamped when David killed Goliath (1 Sam. 17:2, 19). It was near Shochoh of Judah and Azekah (17:1). It is the modern Wady es-Sunt, i.e., "valley of the acacia." "The terebinths from which the valley of Elah takes its name still cling to their ancient soil. On the west side of the valley, near Shochoh, there is a very large and ancient tree of this kind known as the 'terebinth of Wady Sur,' 55 feet in height, its trunk 17 feet in circumference, and the breadth of its shade no less than 75 feet. It marks the upper end of the Elah valley, and forms a noted object, being one of the largest terebinths in Palestine." Geikie's, The Holy Land, etc.

(2.) One of the Edomite chiefs or "dukes" of Mount Seir (Gen. 36:41).

(3.) The second of the three sons of Caleb, the son of Jephunneh (1 Chr. 4:15).

(4.) The son and successor of Baasha, king of Israel (1 Kings 16:8-10). He was killed while drunk by Zimri, one of the captains of his chariots, and was the last king of the line of Baasha. Thus was fullfilled the prophecy of Jehu (6, 7, 11-14).

(5.) The father of Hoshea, the last king of Israel (2 Kings 15:30; 17:1).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Elam.

Elam

  • Elam Highland, the son of Shem (Gen. 10:22), and the name of the country inhabited by his descendants (14:1, 9; Isa. 11:11; 21:2, etc.) lying to the east of Babylonia, and extending to the shore of the Mediterranean, a distance in a direct line of about 1,000 miles. The name Elam is an Assyrian word meaning "high."

"The inhabitants of Elam, or `the Highlands,' to the east of Babylon, were called Elamites. They were divided into several branches, speaking different dialects of the same agglutinative language. The race to which they belonged was brachycephalic, or short-headed, like the pre-Semitic Sumerians of Babylonia.

"The earliest Elamite kingdom seems to have been that of Anzan, the exact site of which is uncertain; but in the time of Abraham, Shushan or Susa appears to have already become the capital of the country. Babylonia was frequently invaded by the Elamite kings, who at times asserted their supremacy over it (as in the case of Chedorlaomer, the Kudur-Lagamar, or `servant of the goddess Lagamar,' of the cuneiform texts).

"The later Assyrian monarchs made several campaigns against Elam, and finally Assur-bani-pal (about B.C. 650) succeeded in conquering the country, which was ravaged with fire and sword. On the fall of the Assyrian Empire, Elam passed into the hands of the Persians" (A.H. Sayce).

This country was called by the Greeks Cissia or Susiana.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Elasah.

Elasah

  • Elasah God made. (1.) One of the descendants of Judah, of the family of Hezron (1 Chr. 2:39, "Eleasah").

(2.) A descendant of king Saul (1 Chr. 8:37; 9:43).

(3.) The son of Shaphan, one of the two who were sent by Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, and also took charge of Jeremiah 's letter to the captives in Babylon (Jer. 29:3).


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Elath.

Elath

  • Elath Grove; trees, (Deut. 2:8), also in plural form Eloth (1 Kings 9:26, etc.); called by the Greeks and Romans Elana; a city of Idumea, on the east, i.e., the Elanitic, gulf, or the Gulf of Akabah, of the Red Sea. It is first mentioned in Deut. 2:8. It is also mentioned along with Ezion-geber in 1 Kings 9:26. It was within the limits of Solomon's dominion, but afterwards revolted. It was, however, recovered and held for a time under king Uzziah (2 Kings 14:22). Now the ruin Aila.


“E-I”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQR