Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)/M-Q

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search

M[edit]

Ma[edit]

“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Maachah.

Maachah*Maachah Oppression, a small Syrian kingdom near Geshur, east of the Hauran, the district of Batanea (Josh. 13:13; 2 Sam. 10:6, 8; 1 Chr. 19:7).

(2.) A daughter of Talmai, king of the old native population of Geshur. She became one of David's wives, and was the mother of Absalom (2 Sam. 3:3).

(3.) The father of Hanan, who was one of David's body-guard (1 Chr. 11:43).

(4.) The daughter of Abishalom (called Absalom, 2 Chr. 11:20-22), the third wife of Rehoboam, and mother of Abijam (1 Kings 15:2). She is called "Michaiah the daughter of Uriel," who was the husband of Absalom's daughter Tamar (2 Chr. 13:2). Her son Abijah or Abijam was heir to the throne.

(5.) The father of Achish, the king of Gath (1 Kings 2:39), called also Maoch (1 Sam. 27:2).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Maaleh-acrabbim.

Maaleh-acrabbim

  • Maaleh-acrabbim Ascent of the scorpions; i.e., "scorpion-hill", a pass on the south-eastern border of Palestine (Num. 34:4; Josh. 15:3). It is identified with the pass of Sufah, entering Palestine from the great Wady el-Fikreh, south of the Dead Sea. (See [370]AKRABBIM.)


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Maarath.

Maarath

  • Maarath Desolation, a place in the mountains of Judah (Josh. 15:59), probably the modern village Beit Ummar, 6 miles north of Hebron.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Maaseiah.

Maaseiah

  • Maaseiah The work of Jehovah. (1.) One of the Levites whom David appointed as porter for the ark (1 Chr. 15:18, 20).

(2.) One of the "captains of hundreds" associated with Jehoiada in restoring king Jehoash to the throne (2 Chr. 23:1).

(3.) The "king's son," probably one of the sons of king Ahaz, killed by Zichri in the invasion of Judah by Pekah, king of Israel (2 Chr. 28:7).

(4.) One who was sent by king Josiah to repair the temple (2 Chr. 34:8). He was governor (Heb. sar, rendered elsewhere in the Authorized Version "prince," "chief captain," chief ruler") of Jerusalem.

(5.) The father of the priest Zephaniah (Jer. 21:1; 37:3).

(6.) The father of the false prophet Zedekiah (Jer. 29:21).

Maase'iah, refuge is Jehovah, a priest, the father of Neriah (Jer. 32:12; 51:59).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Maasiai.

Maasiai

  • Maasiai Work of Jehovah, one of the priests resident at Jerusalem at the Captivity (1 Chr. 9:12).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Maath.

Maath

  • Maath Small, a person named in our Lord's ancestry (Luke 3:26).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Maaziah.

Maaziah

  • Maaziah Strength or consolation of Jehovah. (1.) The head of the twenty-fourth priestly course (1 Chr. 24:18) in David's reign.

(2.) A priest (Neh. 10:8).



“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Machaerus.

Machaerus

  • Machaerus The Black Fortress, was built by Herod the Great in the gorge of Callirhoe, one of the wadies 9 miles east of the Dead Sea, as a frontier rampart against Arab marauders. John the Baptist was probably cast into the prison connected with this castle by Herod Antipas, whom he had reproved for his adulterous marriage with Herodias. Here Herod "made a supper" on his birthday. He was at this time marching against Aretas, king of Perea, to whose daughter he had been married. During the revelry of the banquet held in the border fortress, to please Salome, who danced before him, he sent an executioner, who beheaded John, and "brought his head in a charger, and gave it to the damsel" (Mark 6:14-29). This castle stood "starkly bold and clear" 3,860 feet above the Dead Sea, and 2,546 above the Mediterranean. Its ruins, now called M'khaur, are still visible on the northern end of Jebel Attarus.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Machbanai.

Machbanai

  • Machbanai Clad with a mantle, or bond of the Lord, one of the Gadite heroes who joined David in the wilderness (1 Chr. 12:13).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Machir.

Machir

  • Machir Sold. (1.) Manasseh's oldest son (Josh. 17:1), or probably his only son (see 1 Chr. 7:14, 15; comp. Num. 26:29-33; Josh. 13:31). His descendants are referred to under the name of Machirites, being the offspring of Gilead (Num. 26:29). They settled in land taken from the Amorites (Num. 32:39, 40; Deut. 3:15) by a special enactment (Num. 36:1-3; Josh. 17:3, 4). He is once mentioned as the representative of the tribe of Manasseh east of Jordan (Judg. 5:14).

(2.) A descendant of the preceding, residing at Lo-debar, where he maintained Jonathan's son Mephibosheth till he was taken under the care of David (2 Sam. 9:4), and where he afterwards gave shelter to David himself when he was a fugitive (17:27).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Machpelah.

Machpelah

  • Machpelah Portion; double cave, the cave which Abraham bought, together with the field in which it stood, from Ephron the Hittite, for a family burying-place (Gen. 23). It is one of those Bible localities about the identification of which there can be no doubt. It was on the slope of a hill on the east of Hebron, "before Mamre." Here were laid the bodies of Abraham and Mal.ah, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob and Leah (Gen. 23:19; 25:9; 49:31; 50:13). Over the cave an ancient Christian church was erected, probably in the time of Justinian, the Roman emperor. This church has been converted into a Mohammedan mosque. The whole is surrounded by the el-Haram i.e., "the sacred enclosure," about 200 feet long, 115 broad, and of an average height of about 50. This building, from the immense size of some of its stones, and the manner in which they are fitted together, is supposed by some to have been erected in the days of David or of Solomon, while others ascribe it to the time of Herod. It is looked upon as the most ancient and finest relic of Jewish architecture.

On the floor of the mosque are erected six large cenotaphs as monuments to the dead who are buried in the cave beneath. Between the cenotaphs of Isaac and Rebekah there is a circular opening in the floor into the cavern below, the cave of Machpelah. Here it may be that the body of Jacob, which was embalmed in Egypt, is still preserved (much older embalmed bodies have recently been found in the cave of Deir el-Bahari in Egypt, see [371]PHARAOH), though those of the others there buried may have long ago mouldered into dust. The interior of the mosque was visited by the Prince of Wales in 1862 by a special favour of the Mohammedan authorities. An interesting account of this visit is given in Dean Stanley's Lectures on the Jewish Church. It was also visited in 1866 by the Marquis of Bute, and in 1869 by the late Emperor (Frederick) of Germany, then the Crown Prince of Prussia. In 1881 it was visited by the two sons of the Prince of Wales, accompanied by Sir C. Wilson and others. (See Palestine Quarterly Statement, October 1882).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Madai.

Madai

  • Madai Middle land, the third "son" of Japheth (Gen. 10:2), the name by which the Medes are known on the Assyrian monuments.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Madmannah.

Madmannah

  • Madmannah Dunghill, the modern el-Minyay, 15 miles south-south-west of Gaza (Josh. 15:31; 1 Chr. 2:49), in the south of Judah. The Pal. Mem., however, suggest Umm Deimneh, 12 miles north-east of Beersheba, as the site.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Madmen.

Madmen

  • Madmen Ibid., a Moabite town threatened with the sword of the Babylonians (Jer. 48:2).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Madmenah.

Madmenah

  • Madmenah Ibid., a town in Benjamin, not far from Jerusalem, towards the north (Isa. 10:31). The same Hebrew word occurs in Isa. 25:10, where it is rendered "dunghill." This verse has, however, been interpreted as meaning "that Moab will be trodden down by Jehovah as teben [broken straw] is trodden to fragments on the threshing-floors of Madmenah."


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Madness.

Madness

  • Madness This word is used in its proper sense in Deut. 28:34, John 10:20, 1 Cor. 14:23. It also denotes a reckless state of mind arising from various causes, as over-study (Eccl. 1:17; 2:12), blind rage (Luke 6:11), or a depraved temper (Eccl. 7:25; 9:3; 2 Pet. 2:16). David feigned madness (1 Sam. 21:13) at Gath because he "was sore afraid of Achish."


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Madon.

Madon

  • Madon Strife, a Canaanitish city in the north of Palestine (Josh. 11:1; 12:19), whose king was slain by Joshua; perhaps the ruin Madin, near Hattin, some 5 miles west of Tiberias.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Magdala.

Magdala

  • Magdala A tower, a town in Galilee, mentioned only in Matt. 15:39. In the parallel passage in Mark 8:10 this place is called Dalmanutha. It was the birthplace of Mary called the Magdalen, or Mary Magdalene. It was on the west shore of the Lake of Tiberias, and is now probably the small obscure village called el-Mejdel, about 3 miles north-west of Tiberias. In the Talmud this city is called "the city of colour," and a particular district of it was called "the tower of dyers." The indigo plant was much cultivated here.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Magdalene.

Magdalene

  • Magdalene A surname derived from Magdala, the place of her nativity, given to one of the Marys of the Gospels to distinguish her from the other Marys (Matt. 27:56, 61; 28:1, etc.). A mistaken notion has prevailed that this Mary was a woman of bad character, that she was the woman who is emphatically called "a sinner" (Luke 7:36-50). (See [372]MARY.)


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Magic.

Magic

  • Magic The Jews seem early to have consulted the teraphim (q.v.) for oracular answers (Judg. 18:5, 6; Zech. 10:2). There is a remarkable illustration of this divining by teraphim in Ezek. 21:19-22. We read also of the divining cup of Joseph (Gen. 44:5). The magicians of Egypt are frequently referred to in the history of the Exodus. Magic was an inherent part of the ancient Egyptian religion, and entered largely into their daily life.

All magical arts were distinctly prohibited under penalty of death in the Mosaic law. The Jews were commanded not to learn the "abomination" of the people of the Promised Land (Lev. 19:31; Deut. 18:9-14). The history of Saul's consulting the witch of Endor (1 Sam. 28:3-20) gives no warrant for attributing supernatural power to magicians. From the first the witch is here only a bystander. The practice of magic lingered among the people till after the Captivity, when they gradually abandoned it.

It is not much referred to in the New Testament. The Magi mentioned in Matt. 2:1-12 were not magicians in the ordinary sense of the word. They belonged to a religious caste, the followers of Zoroaster, the astrologers of the East. Simon, a magician, was found by Philip at Samaria (Acts 8:9-24); and Paul and Barnabas encountered Elymas, a Jewish sorcerer, at Paphos (13:6-12). At Ephesus there was a great destruction of magical books (Acts 19:18, 19).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Magicians.

Magicians

  • Magicians Heb. hartumim, (dan. 1:20) were sacred scribes who acted as interpreters of omens, or "revealers of secret things."


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Magistrate.

Magistrate

  • Magistrate A public civil officer invested with authority. The Hebrew shophetim, or judges, were magistrates having authority in the land (Deut. 1:16, 17). In Judg. 18:7 the word "magistrate" (A.V.) is rendered in the Revised Version "possessing authority", i.e., having power to do them harm by invasion. In the time of Ezra (9:2) and Nehemiah (2:16; 4:14; 13:11) the Jewish magistrates were called seganim, properly meaning "nobles." In the New Testament the Greek word archon, rendered "magistrate" (Luke 12:58; Titus 3:1), means one first in power, and hence a prince, as in Matt. 20:25, 1 Cor. 2:6, 8. This term is used of the Messiah, "Prince of the kings of the earth" (Rev. 1:5). In Acts 16:20, 22, 35, 36, 38, the Greek term strategos, rendered "magistrate," properly signifies the leader of an army, a general, one having military authority. The strategoi were the duumviri, the two praetors appointed to preside over the administration of justice in the colonies of the Romans. They were attended by the sergeants (properly lictors or "rod bearers").


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Magog.

Magog

  • Magog Region of Gog, the second of the "sons" of Japheth (Gen. 10:2; 1 Chr. 1:5). In Ezekiel (38:2; 39:6) it is the name of a nation, probably some Scythian or Tartar tribe descended from Japheth. They are described as skilled horsemen, and expert in the use of the bow. The Latin father Jerome says that this word denotes "Scythian nations, fierce and innumerable, who live beyond the Caucasus and the Lake Maeotis, and near the Caspian Sea, and spread out even onward to India." Perhaps the name "represents the Assyrian Mat Gugi, or `country of Gugu,' the Gyges of the Greeks" (Sayce's Races, etc.).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Magor-missabib.

Magor-missabib

  • Magor-missabib Fear on every side, (Jer. 20:3), a symbolical name given to the priest Pashur, expressive of the fate announced by the prophet as about to come upon him. Pashur was to be carried to Babylon, and there die.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahalaleel.

Mahalaleel

  • Mahalaleel Praise of God. (1.) The son of Cainan, of the line of Seth (Gen. 5:12-17); called Maleleel (Luke 3:37).

(2.) Neh. 11:4, a descendant of Perez.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahalath.

Mahalath

  • Mahalath A lute; lyre. (1.) The daughter of Ishmael, and third wife of Esau (Gen. 28:9); called also Bashemath (Gen. 36:3).

(2.) The daughter of Jerimoth, who was one of David's sons. She was one of Rehoboam's wives (2 Chr. 11:18).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahalath Maschil.

Mahalath Leannoth Maschil

  • Mahalath Leannoth Maschil This word leannoth seems to point to some kind of instrument unknown (Ps. 88, title). The whole phrase has by others been rendered, "On the sickness of affliction: a lesson;" or, "Concerning afflictive sickness: a didactic psalm."


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahanaim.

Mahalath Maschil

  • Mahalath Maschil In the title of Ps. 53, denoting that this was a didactic psalm, to be sung to the accompaniment of the lute or guitar. Others regard this word "mahalath" as the name simply of an old air to which the psalm was to be sung. Others, again, take the word as meaning "sickness," and regard it as alluding to the contents of the psalm.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahalath Leannoth Maschil.

Mahanaim

  • Mahanaim Two camps, a place near the Jabbok, beyond Jordan, where Jacob was met by the "angels of God," and where he divided his retinue into "two hosts" on his return from Padan-aram (Gen. 32:2). This name was afterwards given to the town which was built at that place. It was the southern boundary of Bashan (Josh. 13:26, 30), and became a city of the Levites (21:38). Here Saul's son Ishbosheth reigned (2 Sam. 2:8, 12), while David reigned at Hebron. Here also, after a troubled reign, Ishbosheth was murdered by two of his own bodyguard (2 Sam. 4:5-7), who brought his head to David at Hebron, but were, instead of being rewarded, put to death by him for their cold-blooded murder. Many years after this, when he fled from Jerusalem on the rebellion of his son Absalom, David made Mahanaim, where Barzillai entertained him, his headquarters, and here he mustered his forces which were led against the army that had gathered around Absalom. It was while sitting at the gate of this town that tidings of the great and decisive battle between the two hosts and of the death of his son Absalom reached him, when he gave way to the most violent grief (2 Sam. 17:24-27).

The only other reference to Mahanaim is as a station of one of Solomon's purveyors (1 Kings 4:14). It has been identified with the modern Mukhumah, a ruin found in a depressed plain called el-Bukie'a, "the little vale," near Penuel, south of the Jabbok, and north-east of es-Salt.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahaneh-dan.

Mahaneh-dan

  • Mahaneh-dan Judg. 18:12 = "camp of Dan" 13:25 (R.V., "Mahaneh-dan"), a place behind (i.e., west of) Kirjath-jearim, where the six hundred Danites from Zorah and Eshtaol encamped on their way to capture the city of Laish, which they rebuilt and called "Dan, after the name of their father" (18:11-31). The Palestine Explorers point to a ruin called `Erma, situated about 3 miles from the great corn valley on the east of Samson's home.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahath.

Mahath

  • Mahath Grasping. (1.) A Kohathite Levite, father of Elkanah (1 Chr. 6:35).

(2.) Another Kohathite Levite, of the time of Hezekiah (2 Chr. 29:12).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahazioth.

Mahazioth

  • Mahazioth Visions, a Kohathite Levite, chief of the twenty-third course of musicians (1 Chr. 25:4, 30).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Maher-shalal-hash-baz.

Maher-shalal-hash-baz

  • Maher-shalal-hash-baz Plunder speedeth; spoil hasteth, (Isa. 8:1-3; comp. Zephaniah 1:14), a name Isaiah was commanded first to write in large characters on a tablet, and afterwards to give as a symbolical name to a son that was to be born to him (Isa. 8:1, 3), as denoting the sudden attack on Damascus and Syria by the Assyrian army.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahlah.

Mahlah

  • Mahlah Disease, one of the five daughters of Zelophehad (Num. 27:1-11) who had their father's inheritance, the law of inheritance having been altered in their favour.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahlon.

Mahlon

  • Mahlon Sickly, the elder of Elimelech the Bethlehemite's two sons by Naomi. He married Ruth and died childless (Ruth 1:2, 5; 4:9, 10), in the land of Moab.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mahol.

Mahol

  • Mahol Dance, the father of four sons (1 Kings 4:31) who were inferior in wisdom only to Solomon.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Mail, Coat of.

Mail, Coat of

  • Mail, Coat of "a corselet of scales," a cuirass formed of pieces of metal overlapping each other, like fish-scales (1 Sam. 17:5); also (38) a corselet or garment thus encased.


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Main-sail.

Main-sail

  • Main-sail (Gr. artemon), answering to the modern "mizzen-sail," as some suppose. Others understand the "jib," near the prow, or the "fore-sail," as likely to be most useful in bringing a ship's head to the wind in the circumstances described (Acts 27:40).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Makheloth.

Makheloth

  • Makheloth Assemblies, a station of the Israelites in the desert (Num. 33:25, 26).


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Makkedah.

Makkedah

  • Makkedah Herdsman's place, one of the royal cities of the Canaanites (Josh. 12:16), near which was a cave where the five kings who had confederated against Israel sought refuge (10:10-29). They were put to death by Joshua, who afterwards suspended their bodies upon five trees. It has been identified with the modern village called Sumeil, standing on a low hill about 7 miles to the north-west of Eleutheropolis (Beit Jibrin), where are ancient remains and a great cave. The Palestine Exploration surveyors have, however, identified it with el-Mughar, or "the caves," 3 miles from Jabneh and 2 1/2 southwest of Ekron, because, they say, "at this site only of all possible sites for Makkedah in the Palestine plain do caves still exist." (See [373]ADONI-ZEDEC.)


“M-Q”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJu