Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)/R-Z

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“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sea, The molten.

Seah

  • Seah In land measure, a space of 50 cubits long by 50 broad. In measure of capacity, a seah was a little over one peck. (See [558]MEASURE.)



“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seah.

Sea of glass

  • Sea of glass A figurative expression used in Rev. 4:6 and 15:2. According to the interpretation of some, "this calm, glass-like sea, which is never in storm, but only interfused with flame, represents the counsels of God, those purposes of righteousness and love which are often fathomless but never obscure, always the same, though sometimes glowing with holy anger." (Comp. Ps. 36:6; 77:19; Rom. 11:33-36.)


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sea of Jazer.

Sea of Jazer

  • Sea of Jazer (Jer. 48:32), a lake, now represented by some ponds in the high valley in which the Ammonite city of Jazer lies, the ruins of which are called Malachi.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sea of glass.

Seasons

  • Seasons (Gen. 8:22). See [560]AGRICULTURE; [561]MONTH.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seasons.

Sea, The

  • Sea, The (Heb. yam), signifies (1) "the gathering together of the waters," the ocean (Gen. 1:10); (2) a river, as the Nile (Isa. 19:5), the Euphrates (Isa. 21:1; Jer. 51:36); (3) the Red Sea (Ex. 14:16, 27; 15:4, etc.); (4) the Mediterranean (Ex. 23:31; Num. 34:6, 7; Josh. 15:47; Ps. 80:11, etc.); (5) the "sea of Galilee," an inland fresh-water lake, and (6) the Dead Sea or "salt sea" (Gen. 14:3; Num. 34:3, 12, etc.). The word "sea" is used symbolically in Isa. 60:5, where it probably means the nations around the Mediterranean. In Dan. 7:3, Rev. 13:1 it may mean the tumultuous changes among the nations of the earth.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seba.

Sea, The molten

  • Sea, The molten The great laver made by Solomon for the use of the priests in the temple, described in 1 Kings 7:23-26; 2 Chr. 4:2-5. It stood in the south-eastern corner of the inner court. It was 5 cubits high, 10 in diameter from brim to brim, and 30 in circumference. It was placed on the backs of twelve oxen, standing with their faces outward. It was capable of containing two or three thousand baths of water (comp. 2 Chr. 4:5), which was originally supplied by the Gibeonites, but was afterwards brought by a conduit from the pools of Bethlehem. It was made of "brass" (copper), which Solomon had taken from the captured cities of Hadarezer, the king of Zobah (1 Chr. 18:8). Ahaz afterwards removed this laver from the oxen, and placed it on a stone pavement (2 Kings 16:17). It was destroyed by the Chaldeans (25:13).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sea, The.

Seba

  • Seba (1.) One of the sons of Cush (Gen. 10:7).

(2.) The name of a country and nation (Isa. 43:3; 45:14) mentioned along with Egypt and Ethiopia, and therefore probably in north-eastern Africa. The ancient name of Meroe. The kings of Sheba and Seba are mentioned together in Ps. 72:10.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sebat.

Sebat

  • Sebat The eleventh month of the Hebrew year, extending from the new moon of February to that of March (Zech. 1:7). Assyrian sabatu, "storm." (See [562]MONTH.)


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Secacah.

Secacah

  • Secacah Enclosure, one of the six cities in the wilderness of Judah, noted for its "great cistern" (Josh. 15:61). It has been identified with the ruin Sikkeh, east of Bethany.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sechu.

Sechu

  • Sechu A hill or watch-tower, a place between Gibeah and Ramah noted for its "great well" (1 Sam. 19:22); probably the modern Suweikeh, south of Beeroth.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sect.

Sect

  • Sect (Gr. hairesis, usually rendered "heresy", Acts 24:14; 1 Chr. 11:19; Gal. 5:20, etc.), meaning properly "a choice," then "a chosen manner of life," and then "a religious party," as the "sect" of the Sadducees (Acts 5:17), of the Pharisees (15:5), the Nazarenes, i.e., Christians (24:5). It afterwards came to be used in a bad sense, of those holding pernicious error, divergent forms of belief (2 Pet. 2:1; Gal. 5:20).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Secundus.

Secundus

  • Secundus Second, a Christian of Thessalonica who accompanied Paul into Asia (Acts 20:4).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seer.

Seer

  • Seer A name sometimes applied to the prophets because of the visions granted to them. It is first found in 1 Sam. 9:9. It is afterwards applied to Zadok, Gad, etc. (2 Sam. 15:27; 24:11; 1 Chr. 9:22; 25:5; 2 Chr. 9:29; Amos 7:12; Micah 3:7). The "sayings of the seers" (2 Chr. 33:18, 19) is rendered in the Revised Version "the history of Hozai" (marg., the seers; so the LXX.), of whom, however, nothing is known. (See [563]PROPHET.)


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seethe.

Seethe

  • Seethe To boil (Ex. 16:23).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seething pot.

Seething pot

  • Seething pot A vessel for boiling provisions in (Job 41:20; Jer. 1:13).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Segub.

Segub

  • Segub Elevated. (1.) The youngest son of Hiel the Bethelite. His death is recorded in 1 Kings 16:34 (comp. Josh. 6:26).

(2.) A descendant of Judah (1 Chr. 2:21, 22).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seir.

Seir

  • Seir Rough; hairy. (1.) A Horite; one of the "dukes" of Edom (Gen. 36:20-30).

(2.) The name of a mountainous region occupied by the Edomites, extending along the eastern side of the Arabah from the south-eastern extremity of the Dead Sea to near the Akabah, or the eastern branch of the Red Sea. It was originally occupied by the Horites (Gen. 14:6), who were afterwards driven out by the Edomites (Gen. 32:3; 33:14, 16). It was allotted to the descendants of Esau (Deut. 2:4, 22; Josh. 24:4; 2 Chr. 20:10; Isa. 21:11; Exek. 25:8).

(3.) A mountain range (not the Edomite range, Gen. 32:3) lying between the Wady Aly and the Wady Ghurab (Josh. 15:10).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seirath.

Seirath

  • Seirath Woody district; shaggy, a place among the mountains of Ephraim, bordering on Benjamin, to which Ehud fled after he had assassinated Eglon at Jericho (Judg. 3:26, 27).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sela.

Sela

  • Sela =Se'lah, rock, the capital of Edom, situated in the great valley extending from the Dead Sea to the Red Sea (2 Kings 14:7). It was near Mount Hor, close by the desert of Zin. It is called "the rock" (Judg. 1:36). When Amaziah took it he called it Joktheel (q.v.) It is mentioned by the prophets (Isa. 16:1; Obad. 1:3) as doomed to destruction.

It appears in later history and in the Vulgate Version under the name of Petra. "The caravans from all ages, from the interior of Arabia and from the Gulf of Persia, from Hadramaut on the ocean, and even from Sabea or Yemen, appear to have pointed to Petra as a common centre; and from Petra the tide seems again to have branched out in every direction, to Egypt, Palestine, and Syria, through Arsinoe, Gaza, Tyre, Jerusalem, and Damascus, and by other routes, terminating at the Mediterranean." (See [564]EDOM [2].)


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Selah.

Selah

  • Selah A word frequently found in the Book of Psalms, and also in Hab. 3:9, 13, about seventy-four times in all in Scripture. Its meaning is doubtful. Some interpret it as meaning "silence" or "pause;" others, "end," "a louder strain," "piano," etc. The LXX. render the word by daplasma i.e., "a division."


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sela-hammahlekoth.

Sela-hammahlekoth

  • Sela-hammahlekoth Cliff of divisions the name of the great gorge which lies between Hachilah and Maon, south-east of Hebron. This gorge is now called the Wady Malaky. This was the scene of the interview between David and Saul mentioned in 1 Sam. 26:13. Each stood on an opposing cliff, with this deep chasm between.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seleucia.

Seleucia

  • Seleucia The sea-port of Antioch, near the mouth of the Orontes. Paul and his companions sailed from this port on their first missionary journey (Acts 13:4). This city was built by Seleucus Nicator, the "king of Syria." It is said of him that "few princes have ever lived with so great a passion for the building of cities. He is reputed to have built in all nine Seleucias, sixteen Antiochs, and six Laodiceas." Seleucia became a city of great importance, and was made a "free city" by Pompey. It is now a small village, called el-Kalusi.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Semei.

Semei

  • Semei Mentioned in the genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:26).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Senaah.

Senaah

  • Senaah Thorny, a place many of the inhabitants of which returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:35; Neh. 7:38).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Senate.

Senate

  • Senate (Acts 5:21), the "elders of Israel" who formed a component part of the Sanhedrin.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seneh.

Seneh

  • Seneh The acacia; rock-thorn, the southern cliff in the Wady es-Suweinit, a valley south of Michmash, which Jonathan climbed with his armour-bearer (1 Sam. 14:4, 5). The rock opposite, on the other side of the wady, was called Bozez.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Senir.

Senir

  • Senir =Shenir, the name given to Hermon by the Amorites (Deut. 3:9). It means "coat of mail" or "breastplate," and is equivalent to "Sirion." Some interpret the word as meaning "the prominent" or "the snowy mountain." It is properly the name of the central of the three summits of Hermon (q.v.).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seorim.

Seorim

  • Seorim Barley, the chief of the forth priestly course (1 Chr. 24:8).


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Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sephar.

Sephar

  • Sephar Numbering, (Gen. 10:30), supposed by some to be the ancient Himyaritic capital, "Shaphar," Zaphar, on the Indian Ocean, between the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sepharad.

Sepharad

  • Sepharad (Obad. 1:20), some locality unknown. The modern Jews think that Spain is meant, and hence they designate the Spanish Jews "Sephardim," as they do the German Jews by the name "Ashkenazim," because the rabbis call Germany Ashkenaz. Others identify it with Malachidis, the capital of Lydia. The Latin father Jerome regarded it as an Assyrian word, meaning "boundary," and interpreted the sentence, "which is in Sepharad," by "who are scattered abroad in all the boundaries and regions of the earth." Perowne says: "Whatever uncertainty attaches to the word Sepharad, the drift of the prophecy is clear, viz., that not only the exiles from Babylon, but Jewish captives from other and distant regions, shall be brought back to live prosperously within the enlarged borders of their own land."


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Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
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GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sepharvaim.

Sepharvaim

  • Sepharvaim Taken by Malachigon, king of Assyria (2 Kings 17:24; 18:34; 19:13; Isa. 37:13). It was a double city, and received the common name Sepharvaim, i.e., "the two Sipparas," or "the two booktowns." The Sippara on the east bank of the Euphrates is now called Abu-Habba; that on the other bank was Accad, the old capital of Malachigon I., where he established a great library. (See [566]SARGON.) The recent discovery of cuneiform inscriptions at Tel el-Amarna in Egypt, consisting of official despatches to Pharaoh Amenophis IV. and his predecessor from their agents in Palestine, proves that in the century before the Exodus an active literary intercourse was carried on between these nations, and that the medium of the correspondence was the Babylonian language and script. (See [567]KIRJATH-SEPHER.)



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Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Serah.

Serah

  • Serah Abundance; princess, the daughter of Asher and grand-daughter of Jacob (Gen. 46:17); called also Malachiah (Num. 26:46; R.V., "Serah").


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seraiah.

Seraiah

  • Seraiah Soldier of Jehovah. (1.) The father of Joab (1 Chr. 4:13, 14).

(2.) The grandfather of Jehu (1 Chr. 4:35).

(3.) One of David's scribes or secretaries (2 Sam. 8:17).

(4.) A Netophathite (Jer. 40:8), a chief priest of the time of Zedekiah. He was carried captive by Nebuchadnezzar to Babylon, and there put to death (2 Kings 25:18, 23).

(5.) Ezra 2:2.

(6.) Father of Ezra the scribe (7:1).

(7.) A ruler of the temple (Neh. 11:11).

(8.) A priest of the days of Jehoiakim (Neh. 12:1, 12).

(9.) The son of Neriah. When Zedekiah made a journey to Babylon to do homage to Nebuchadnezzar, Seraiah had charge of the royal gifts to be presented on that occasion. Jeremiah took advantage of the occasion, and sent with Seraiah a word of cheer to the exiles in Babylon, and an announcement of the doom in store for that guilty city. The roll containing this message (Jer. 50:1-8) Seraiah was to read to the exiles, and then, after fixing a stone to it, was to throw it into the Euphrates, uttering, as it sank, the prayer recorded in Jer. 51:59-64. Babylon was at this time in the height of its glory, the greatest and most powerful monarchy in the world. Scarcely seventy years elapsed when the words of the prophet were all fulfilled. Jer. 51:59 is rendered in the Revised Version, "Now Seraiah was chief chamberlain," instead of "was a quiet prince," as in the Authorized Version.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Seraphim.

Seraphim

  • Seraphim Mentioned in Isa. 6:2, 3, 6, 7. This word means fiery ones, in allusion, as is supposed, to their burning love. They are represented as "standing" above the King as he sat upon his throne, ready at once to minister unto him. Their form appears to have been human, with the addition of wings. (See [570]ANGELS.) This word, in the original, is used elsewhere only of the "fiery serpents" (Num. 21:6, 8; Deut. 8:15; comp. Isa. 14:29; 30:6) sent by God as his instruments to inflict on the people the righteous penalty of sin.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sered.

Sered

  • Sered Fear, one of the sons of Zebulun (Gen. 46:14).


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sergeants.

Sergeants

  • Sergeants Acts 16:35, 38 (R.V., "lictors"), officers who attended the magistrates and assisted them in the execution of justice.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Sergius Paulus.

Sergius Paulus

  • Sergius Paulus A "prudent man" (R.V., "man of understanding"), the deputy (R.V., "proconsul") of Cyprus (Acts 13:6-13). He became a convert to Christianity under Paul, who visited this island on his first mission to the heathen.

A remarkable memorial of this proconsul was recently (1887) discovered at Rome. On a boundary stone of Claudius his name is found, among others, as having been appointed (A.D. 47) one of the curators of the banks and the channel of the river Tiber. After serving his three years as proconsul at Cyprus, he returned to Rome, where he held the office referred to. As he is not saluted in Paul's letter to the Romans, he probably died before it was written.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Serpent.

Serpent

  • Serpent (Heb. nahash; Gr. ophis), frequently noticed in Scripture. More than forty species are found in Syria and Arabia. The poisonous character of the serpent is alluded to in Jacob's blessing on Dan (Gen. 49:17; see Prov. 30:18, 19; James 3:7; Jer. 8:17). (See [571]ADDER.)

This word is used symbolically of a deadly, subtle, malicious enemy (Luke 10:19).

The serpent is first mentioned in connection with the history of the temptation and fall of our first parents (Gen. 3). It has been well remarked regarding this temptation: "A real serpent was the agent of the temptation, as is plain from what is said of the natural characteristic of the serpent in the first verse of the chapter (3:1), and from the curse pronounced upon the animal itself. But that Satan was the actual tempter, and that he used the serpent merely as his instrument, is evident (1) from the nature of the transaction; for although the serpent may be the most subtle of all the beasts of the field, yet he has not the high intellectual faculties which the tempter here displayed. (2.) In the New Testament it is both directly asserted and in various forms assumed that Satan seduced our first parents into sin (John 8:44; Rom. 16:20; 2 Cor. 11:3, 14; Rev. 12:9; 20:2)." Hodge's System. Theol., ii. 127.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Serug.

Serpent, Fiery

  • Serpent, Fiery (LXX. "deadly," Vulg. "burning"), Num. 21:6, probably the naja haje of Egypt; some swift-springing, deadly snake (Isa. 14:29). After setting out from their encampment at Ezion-gaber, the Israelites entered on a wide sandy desert, which stretches from the mountains of Edom as far as the Persian Gulf. While traversing this region, the people began to murmur and utter loud complaints against Moses. As a punishment, the Lord sent serpents among them, and much people of Israel died. Moses interceded on their behalf, and by divine direction he made a "brazen serpent," and raised it on a pole in the midst of the camp, and all the wounded Israelites who looked on it were at once healed. (Comp. John 3:14, 15.) (See [572]ASP.) This "brazen serpent" was preserved by the Israelites till the days of Hezekiah, when it was destroyed (2 Kings 18:4). (See [573]BRASS.)


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Serpent, Fiery.

Serug

  • Serug Branch, the father of Nahor (Gen. 11:20-23); called Malachiuch in Luke 3:35.


“R-Z”
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWYZ
GenExLevNumDtJosJdgRu1-2 Sam1-2 Ki1-2 ChrEzraNehEstPsmPrvJobSongEccIsaJerLamEzekDanHosJoelAmObJnhMicNahHabkZephHagZechMalMtMkLkJnActRom1Cor2CorGalEphPhilpCol1-2Thes1Tim2TimTitusPhimHebrJam1Pet2Pet1Jn2Jn3JnJuRev
See the modern Wikipedia entry at Servitor.