Executive Order 12881

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Signed by President  William J. Clinton  Tuesday, November 23, 1993 Federal Register  page & date: 58 FR 62491, Friday, November 26, 1993

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including section 301 of title 3, United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Establishment.

There is established the National Science and Technology Council ("the Council").

Sec. 2. Membership.

The Council shall comprise the:

(a) President, who shall serve as Chairman of the Council;

(b) Vice President;

(c) Secretary of Commerce;

(d) Secretary of Defense;

(e) Secretary of Energy;

(f) Secretary of Health and Human Services;

(g) Secretary of State;

(h) Secretary of the Interior;

(i) Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration;

(j) Director, National Science Foundation;

(k) Director of the Office of Management and Budget;

(l) Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency;

(m) Assistant to the President for Science and Technology;

(n) National Security Adviser;

(o) Assistant to the President for Economic Policy;

(p) Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy; and

(q) Such other officials of executive departments and agencies as the President may, from time to time, designate.

Sec. 3. Meetings of the Council.

The President or, upon his direction, the Assistant to the President for Science and Technology ("the Assistant"), may convene meetings of the Council. The President shall preside over the meetings of the Council, provided that in his absence the Vice President, and in his absence the Assistant, will preside.

Sec. 4. Functions.

(a) The principal functions of the Council are, to the extent permitted by law:

(1) to coordinate the science and technology policymaking process;

(2) to ensure science and technology policy decisions and programs are consistent with the President's stated goals;

(3) to help integrate the President's science and technology policy agenda across the Federal Government;

(4) to ensure science and technology are considered in development and implementation of Federal policies and programs; and

(5) to further international cooperation in science and technology.

The Assistant may take such actions, including drafting a Charter, as may be necessary or appropriate to implement such functions.

(b) All executive departments and agencies, whether or not represented on the Council, shall coordinate science and technology policy throughthe Council and shall share information on research and development budget requests with the Council.

(c) The Council shall develop for submission to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget recommendations on research and development budgets that reflect national goals. In addition, the Council shall provide advice to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget concerning the agencies' research and development budget submissions.

(d) The Assistant will, when appropriate, work in conjunction with the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and the National Security Adviser.

Sec. 5. Administration.

(a) The Council will oversee the duties of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology, the National Space Council, and the National Critical Materials Council.

(b) The Council may function through established or ad hoc committees, task forces, or interagency groups.

(c) To the extent practicable and permitted by law, executive departments and agencies shall make resources, including, but not limited to, personnel, office support, and printing, available to the Council as requested by the Assistant.

(d) All executive departments and agencies shall cooperate with the Council and provide such assistance, information, and advice to the Council as the Council may request, to the extent permitted by law.


William J. Clinton
THE WHITE HOUSE,
November 23, 1993.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).