Executive Order 412

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Signed by President  Theodore Roosevelt  Monday, February 19, 1906
Amends Executive Order 348-C, August 31, 1905. Also see Executive Order 373-A, November 25, 1905.

In order to more clearly express the intention prompting the issuance of the original order fixing the compensation and allowances of the members of the Board of Consulting Engineers upon plans for the Panama Canal the Executive Order of August 31, 1905, is hereby amended to read as follows:


"It is hereby ordered that each member of the Advisory Board of Engineers upon plans for the Panama Canal shall be allowed $5000, payable upon the completion of the report of the Board. In addition thereto he shall receive $15 per day during the time he may be engaged upon the work of the Board, including Sundays and legal holidays, from the date of first leaving home to assemble as a Board until the date of arrival at home after the conclusion of his services on said Board.


"For the time, subsequent to final adjournment, required in closing the work of the Board, in completing its records, printing its report and appendix matter, and in distribution of the same, the Chairman is allowed the same per diem for 15 days additional.


"Each member shall also be allowed the actual cost of transportation incurred by him in necessary travel in connection with the work of the Board, to include cost of ticket by railway or steamer, sleeping or parlor car accommodations, baggage transfer, cabs and porterage.


"It is further ordered that the allowances to General Davis and General Abbot shall be increased by the amount of their retired pay for the time during which they are employed upon the work of the Board, it being my intention that those members shall receive the same compensation for this work as the other members and this increase being made to provide for the usual deduction of retired officers' pay."

Signature of Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt.

White House,

February 19, 1906.


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).