History of the Wars/Index

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The Persian War[edit]

A[edit]

Abandanes,
 secretary of Chosroes, sent to Belisarius, II. xxi. 1 ff.;
 his report, II. xxi. 13, 14

Abasgi, their location, II. xxix. 15;
 friends of the Romans, _ib._

Abochorabus, ruler of the Saracens of Arabia, presents the Palm Groves
    to Justinian, I. xix. 10 ff.

Aborrhas River, protects one side of Circesium, II. v. 2;
 near Theodosiopolis, II. xix. 29

Abramus, becomes king of the Homeritae, I. xx. 3;
 his servile origin, I. xx. 4;
 defeats two Aethiopian armies, I. xx. 5-7;
 pays tribute to the Aethiopians, I. xx. 8;
 his idle promises to Justinian to invade Persia, I. xx. 13

Abydus, city opposite Sestus on the Hellespont, II. iv. 9

Acacius, father of Adolius, II. xxi. 2;
 denounces Amazaspes to the emperor, II. iii. 4;
 slays him treacherously, II. iii. 5;
 his shameless career as governor of Armenia, II. iii. 6, 7;
 slain by the Armenians, II. iii. 7

Adarbiganon, Chosroes halts there with his army, II. xxiv. 1;
 the fire-sanctuary located there, II. xxiv. 2;
 abandoned by Chosroes, II. xxiv. 12

Adergoudounbades, made "chanaranges" by Chosroes, I. vi. 15, 18;
 saves Cabades from the hand of Chosroes, I. xxiii. 7 ff.;
 betrayed by his son, I. xxiii. 13;
 his death, I. xxiii. 21

Adolius, son of Acacius, an Armenian, urges severe treatment of Armenians,
    II. iii. 10;
 commander of Roman cavalry, II. xxi. 2, 18, 20;
 commands a detachment in an army to invade Persia, II. xxiv. 13;
 killed by a stone, II. xxv. 35

Adonachus, commander in Chalcis, II. xii. 2

Adrastadaran Salanes, an office in Persia of high authority
    (_lit._ "Leader of the Warriors"), I. vi 18, xi. 25;
 held only by Seoses, I. xi. 38

Adulis, in Aethiopia, the city and harbour, distance from Auxomis,
    I. xix. 22;
 home of a certain
 Roman trader, I. xx. 4

Aegypt, its topography, I. xix. 3;
 John the Cappadocian an exile there, I. xxv. 43;
 the pestilence there, II. xxii. 6

Aeimachus, a butcher of Antioch, his encounter with a Persian horseman,
    II. xi. 8 ff.

Aelas, on the "Red Sea," I. xix. 3, 19, 24

Aethiopians, location of their country, I. xix. 17;
 the ships used there, I. xix. 23;
 iron not produced there nor imported from elsewhere, I. xix. 24. 25;
 sought as allies by Justinian, I. xix. 1, xx. 9 ff., II. iii. 40;
 unable to buy silk from the Indians, I. xx. 12

Agamemnon, father of Iphigenia, I. xvii. II

Agesta, _i.e._, "agger," employed by the Persians in besieging Edessa,
    II. xxvi. 29

Aigan, Massagete chief, in the Roman army at the battle of Daras,
    I. xiii. 20, xiv. 39, 44

Alamoundaras, son of Saccice, king of the Saracens, marches with
 the Persian army, I. xvii. 1;
 his character and services to the Persians, I. xvii. 40 ff.;
 advises Cabades to invade Roman territory south of the Euphrates River,
    I. xvii. 30 ff.;
 retires with Azarethes before Belisarius, I. xviii. 9 ff.;
 brings charge against Arethas of violating boundary lines, II. i. 3;
 war with Arethas, II. xxviii. 12-14;
 sacrifices to Aphrodite the son of Arethas, II. xxviii. 13;
 sought as an ally by Justinian, II. i. 13, iii. 47;
 accused by Justinian of violating the treaty, II. iv. 21;
 a menace to Syria and Phoenicia, II. xvi. 17;
 also to Lebanon, II. xix. 34

Alani, their location, II. xxix. 15;
 friends of the Romans, _ib._;
 neighbours of the Sunitae, I. xv. 1;
 persuaded by Goubazes to ally themselves with him, II. xxix. 29

Albani, a people near the Taurus, I. x. 1

Alexander, son of Philip, fortified the Caspian Gates, I. x. 9;
 Justinian compared with him, II. ii. 15

Alexander, ambassador to the Persians, I. xxii. 1

Alexandria, visited by the pestilence, II. xxii. 6;
 citizens of, accused by John the Cappadocian, I. xxv. 44

Amazaspes, nephew of Symeon, made ruler of certain Armenian villages,
    II. iii. 3;
 denounced to the emperor, II. iii. 4;
 treacherously slain, II. iii. 5

Ambazouces, a Hun, offers to sell to Anastasius the control of the Caspian
    Gates, I. x. 10;
 his death, I. x. 12

Ambrus, a Saracen Christian, saves Sergiopolis from capture by Chosroes,
    II. xx. 10, 14

Amida, a city on the border between Armenia and Mesopotamia, I. xvii. 24;
 distance from Martyropolis, I. xxi. 6;
 distance from the Nymphius River, I. viii. 22;
 from Siphrios, I. viii. 10;
 from Endielon, I. vii. 5;
 from Thilasamon, I. ix. 14;
 besieged by Cabades, I. vii. 3, 12 ff.;
 bravely defended, I. vii. 4, 12 ff.;
 captured by Cabades, I. vii. 29;
 besieged by the Romans, I. ix. 1-4;
 recovered by the Romans by purchase, I. ix. 20, 23;
 captives of, generously treated by Chosroes, I. vii. 34;
 citizens relieved of taxes, I. vii. 35

Ammodios, a place near Daras, I. xiii. 15, 38; II. xxviii. 35

Anastasius, Roman emperor, uncle of Hypatius, I. viii. 2, xi. 24;
 of Probus, I. xii. 6;
 and of Pompeius, I. xxiv. 19;
 refuses to purchase from Ambazouces the control of the Caspian Gates,
    I. x. 10, 11, xvi. 4;
 insurrection raised against him by Vitalianus, I. viii. 3, xiii. 10;
 refuses request of Cabades for a loan, I. vii. 1, 2;
 shews favour to citizens of Amida, I. vii. 35;
 sends succour to Amida, I. viii. 1;
 fortifies Daras, I. x. 13;
 placates Cabades, I. x. 17;
 fortifies Theodosiopolis, I. x. 18, 19;
 his death, I. xi. 1

Anastasius of Daras, overthrows tyranny there, I. xxvi. 8, II. iv. 15;
 bears a letter from Justinian to Chosroes, II. iv. 15;
 detained by Chosroes, II. iv. 26;
 dismissed by Chosroes, II. v. 27;
 present with Chosroes at the sack of Sura, II. ix. 10

Anatolius, General of the East, averts danger to the empire by courtesy
    to the Persian king, I. ii. 12-15

Andreas, of Byzantium, his exploits in single combat, I. xiii. 30 ff.

Anglon, village in Persarmenia, II. xxv. 5;
 Roman armies routed there, II. xxv. 23 ff.

Aniabedes, sent by Chosroes to capture Petra, II. xvii. 4;
 impaled by Chosroes, II. xvii. 11

Antinous, city of, in Aegypt, John the Cappadocian imprisoned there,
    I. xxv. 43

Antioch, its importance, I. xvii. 36, II. viii. 23, ix. 3, x. 5;
 situation, II. vi. 10, viii. 21;
 ease with which it might be captured, I. xvii. 38;
 character of the inhabitants, I. xvii. 37, II. viii. 6;
 distance from Beroea, II. vii. 21;
 from Seleucia, II. xi. 1;
 visited by an earthquake, II. xiv. 6;
 the citizens propose to buy off Chosroes, II. vi. 16;
 besieged by Chosroes, II. viii. 1 ff.;
 the wall stormed by Chosroes, II. viii. 8 ff.;
 captured by Chosroes, II. viii. 20 ff.;
 plundered by Chosroes, II. ix. 14 ff.;
 burnt, II. ix. 17, 18;
 young men of, check the victorious Persians in a street fight,
    II. viii. 28, 29, 32, ix. 5;
 citizens of, massacred by the Persians, II. viii. 34;
 church of, robbed of great treasures by Chosroes, II. ix. 15, 16;
 spared in the burning of the city, II. ix. 18, x. 6;
 citizens of, receive portent of coming misfortunes, II. x. 1 ff.; xiv. 5;
 two women of, their sad fate at the capture of the city, II. viii. 35;
 captives of, offered for sale by Chosroes, II. xiii. 2 ff.;
 settled by Chosroes in a newly built city under
 special laws, II. xiv. 1 ff.

Antioch of Chosroes, special laws concerning it, II. xiv. 3, 4

Antonina, wife of Belisarius, brings about the downfall of John the
     Cappadocian, I. xxv. 13 ff.;
 departs to the East, I. xxv. 23

Apamea, city of Syria, II. xi. 2, 4;
 wood of the Cross preserved there, II. xi. 14;
 it gives forth a miraculous light in the church, II. xi. 17, 18;
 visited by Chosroes, II. xi. 14 ff.;
 entered by Chosroes and robbed of all its treasure, II. xi. 24 ff.;
 a citizen of, accuses a Persian of having violated his daughter,
    II. xi. 36

Aphrodite, son of Arethas sacrificed to, II. xxviii. 13

Apion, an Aegyptian, manager of finances in the Roman army, I. viii. 5

Arabia, its location, I. xix. 20

Arabian Gulf, called "Red Sea" by Procopius, I. xix. 2;
 its description, I. xix. 2 ff.

Aratius, in company with Narses defeats Sittas and Belisarius,
    I. xii. 21, 22;
 deserts to the Romans, I. xii. 22, xv. 31;
 sent to Italy, I. xii. 22

Arcadius, Roman emperor, when about to die makes provision for the
    safety of his heir, I. ii. 1 ff.

Archaeopolis, a strong city of Lazica, II. xxix. 18

Areobindus, son-in-law of Olyvrius,
 Roman general, I. viii. 1;
 flees with his army before Cabades, I. viii. 10, 11;
 summoned to Byzantium, I. ix. 1

Ares, House of, portion of the imperial residence in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 9

Arethas, son of Gabalas, made king of the Saracens of Arabia by Justinian
    and pitted against Alamoundaras, I. xvii. 47, 48;
 with the Roman army, I. xviii. 7;
 at the battle on the Euphrates, I. xviii. 26, 35;
 quarrels with Alamoundaras, II. i. 3-7;
 joins Belisarius in Mesopotamia, II. xvi. 5;
 sent by Belisarius to plunder Assyria, II. xix. 11, 15 ff.;
 returns another way, II. xix. 26 ff.;
 wages war against Alamoundaras, II. xxviii. 12-14;
 son of, sacrificed to Aphrodite, II. xxviii. 13

Argek, a guardsman, his effective fighting against the Persians at Edessa,
    II. xxvi. 26, 27

Armenia, considered by some to extend as far as Amida, I. xvii. 24;
 Armenians wage war with Persia, I. v. 10 ff.;
 History of the Armenians, I. v. 9, 40

Arsaces, king of Armenia, progenitor of the Arsacidae, II. iii. 32;
 his abdication, II. iii. 35

Arsaces, king of Armenia, wages a truceless war with Persia, I. v. 10 ff.;
 slandered to Pacurius, I. v. 16;
 victim of strategem of Magi, betrays himself to Pacurius, I. v. 19 ff.;
 confined in the Prison of Oblivion, I. v. 29 ff.;
 kills himself, I. v. 39

Arsaces, last king of Armenia, gives his kingdom to Theodosius, II. iii. 35

Arsaces, commander in Sura, killed while valiantly defending the city,
    II. v. 11

Arsacidae, descendants of the Armenian king, Arsaces, II. iii. 32;
  their privileges, II. iii. 35

Arsinus River, tributary to the Euphrates, I. xvii. 21

Artabanes, son of John, of the Arsacidae, slays Sittas, II. iii. 25

Artace, suburb of Cyzicus, I. xxv. 31

Artemis among the Taurians, sanctuary of, in Celesene, I. xvii. 11;
 a sanctuary of, founded by Orestes in Pontus, I. xvii. 15;
 another in Cappadocia, I. xvii. 18

Arzamon, in Mesopotamia, distance from Constantina, I. viii. 10

Arzanene, district of Armenia beyond the River Nymphius,
   I. viii. 21, II. xv. 7;
 invaded by Celer, I. viii. 21

Ascan, a Massagete chief, at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 21, xiv. 44;
 his exploits at the battle on the Euphrates and his death, I. xviii. 38

Asia, entered from the Hellespont by the Huns, II. iv. 9

Aspebedes, uncle of Chosroes, I. xi. 5, xxiii. 6;
 negotiates a treaty with Celer, I. ix. 24;
 shares command of invading army, I. xxi. 4;
 put to death by Chosroes, I. xxiii. 6

Aspetiani, their alliance with Sittas frustrated by a misunderstanding,
    II. iii. 12-18

Assyria, plundered by Arethas, II. xix. 15 ff.

Athens, a city near Lazica, II. xxix. 22, xxx. 14

Attachas, place in Armenia, distance from Martyropolis, I. xxi. 9

Augarus, toparch of Edessa, II. xii. 8;
 friend of Augustus, II. xii. 8, 9;
 his visit to Rome, II. xii. 9 ff.;
 with difficulty persuades Augustus to allow him to return,
    II. xii. 11 ff.;
 receives from Augustus the promise of a hippodrome for Edessa,
    II. xii. 18;
 his enigmatic reply to the
 enquiries of the citizens, II. xii. 19;
 stricken with gout, seeks relief from physicians, II. xii. 20, 21;
 invites Christ to come to Edessa, II. xii. 24;
 cured upon receiving the reply of Christ, II. xii. 28;
 son of, an unrighteous ruler, delivers over Edessa to Persia, II. xii. 28

Augustus, Roman emperor, his affection for Augarus, II. xii. 8-19

Augustus, priest in Byzantium, II. xxx. 53, 54

Auxomis, capital city of the Homeritae, I. xix. 17;
 distance from Adulis, I. xix. 22;
 from Elephantina and the Roman boundary, I. xix. 27

Auxomitae, name applied to some of the Aethiopians, I. xix. 17

Azarethes, Persian general, invades Roman territory, I. xvii. 1, xviii. 1;
 retires before Belisarius, I. xviii. 9 ff.;
 exhorts the Persian army, I. xviii. 27 ff.;
 arrays them for battle, I. xviii. 30;
 dishonoured by Cabades, I. xviii. 51 ff.;
 at the siege of Edessa, II. xxvii. 41

B[edit]

Baradotus, priest of Constantina,
 his godliness, II. xiii. 13;
 persuades Cabades to spare Constantina, II. xiii. 14, 15

Barbalissum, fortress on the Euphrates, distance from Obbane, II. xii. 4

Barbarian Plain, The, near Sergiopolis, II. v. 29

Baresmanas, Persian general, at the battle of Daras,
    I. xiii. 16, xiv. 32, 45;
 standard bearer of, attacked and killed by Sunicas, I. xiv. 47-50

Barlaus, Gate of, in the wall of Edessa, II. xxvii. 44

Basilides, appointed quaestor in place of Tribunianus, I. xxiv. 18

Basilius, father of John of Edessa, II. xxi. 27

Bassaces, son-in-law of John, accompanies him on a mission to Bouzes,
    II. iii. 29;
 escapes with his companions from an ambush, II. iii. 30;
 leads an embassy to the Persian king, II. iii. 31;
 comes with Armenians to Byzantium, II. xxi. 34

Bassicius, trusted friend of the Armenian king Arsaces, I. v. 17;
  flayed by Pacurius, I. v. 28

Batne, fortress one day's journey distant from Edessa, II. xii. 31

Belisarius, married to Antonina, I. xxv. 11;
 in company with Sittas invades Persarmenia, I. xii. 20, 21;
 defeated by Narses and Aratius, I. xii. 22;
 appointed commander of troops in Daras with Procopius his adviser,
    I. xii. 24;
 at the command of Justinian undertakes to build a fortress in Mindouos,
    I. xiii. 2, 3;
 prevented by the Persians, I. xiii. 4 ff.;
 made General of the East, I. xiii. 9;
 in company with Hermogenes prepares to meet the Persians at Daras,
    I. xiii. 12 ff.;
 at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 19 ff.;
 sends letters to Mirranes, I. xiv. 1 ff., 7;
 address to his soldiers, I. xiv. 20 ff.;
 arrays the army on the second day of the battle of Daras, I. xiv. 28;
 wins a brilliant victory, I. xiv. 47 ff.;
 recalls the Romans from the pursuit of the Persians, I. xiv. 53;
 hurries to meet the invading army of Azarethes I. xviii. 4;
 follows the retiring Persian army, I. xviii. 9 ff.;
 ridiculed by his army, I. xviii. 12;
 attempts to dissuade the Romans from battle, I. xviii. 16 ff.;
 insulted by his army, I. xviii. 24;
 arrays them for battle, I. xviii. 25, 26;
 fights valiantly after most of the Roman army had been routed,
    I. xviii. 41 ff.;
 returns to Byzantium in order to go against the Vandals, I. xxi. 2;
 his share in quelling the Nika insurrection, I. xxiv. 40 ff.;
 made General of the East and sent to Libya, I. xxvi. 1;
 victorious in Italy, II. i. 1;
 brings Vittigis to Byzantium, II. iv. 13;
 shares the command of the East with Bouzes, II. vi. 1;
 summoned from Italy to Byzantium, II. xiv. 8;
 sent against Chosroes, II. xiv. 8, 13;
 gathers an army in Mesopotamia, II. xvi. 1 ff.;
 invades Persia, II. xviii. 1 ff.;
 defeats Nabedes at Nisibis, II. xviii. 24, 25;
 sends Arethas into Assyria, II. xix. 15;
 attacks Sisauranon, II. xix. 4 ff.;
 captures it, II. xix. 24;
 holds consultation with commanders, II. xix. 35 ff.;
 returns to Roman territory, II. xix. 45;
 recalled to Byzantium, II. xix. 49;
 journeys swiftly to the East to confront Chosroes, II. xx. 20;
 gathers an army at Europum, II. xx. 24 ff.;
 receives Abandanes, the envoy of Chosroes, I. xxi. 2 ff.;
 forces Chosroes to retire, II. xxi. 21;
 gives John of Edessa as a hostage, II. xxi. 27;
 his great fame, II. xxi. 28, 29;
 summoned to Byzantium, II. xxi. 34

Beroea, a town of Syria between Hierapolis and Antioch, II. vii. 2;
 distance from Chalcis, II. xii. 1;
 Chosroes demands money from the inhabitants, II. vii. 5;
 the citizens retire to the acropolis, II. vii. 7;
 the lower city entered by Chosroes and a large part of it fired,
    II. vii. 10, 11;
 acropolis valiantly defended against Chosroes, II. vii. 12;
 miserable plight of the besieged, II. vii. 13;
 citizens capitulate to Chosroes, II. vii. 35

Beros, an Erulian leader, encamps near Martinus, II. xxiv. 14;
 with Philemouth follows Peter into Persia, II. xxiv. 18

Bessas, a Goth, officer in the Roman army, I. viii. 3;
 commander in Martyropolis, I. xxi. 5

Bithynians, on the Euxine Sea, II. xxviii. 23

Black Gulf, II. iv. 8

Black Sea, _See_ "Euxine."

Blases, brother of Perozes, chosen king in place of Cabades, deposed,
    I. v. 2;
 imprisoned and blinded by Cabades, I. vi. 17

Blemyes, a people of upper Aegypt, I. xix. 28;
 receive annual payment from the Roman emperor, I. xix. 32, 33;
 Diocletian purposes to hold them in check by means of the Nobatae,
    I. xix. 30;
 their religion, I. xix. 35, 36

Bleschames, commander of the Persian soldiers in Sisauranon, II. xix. 3;
 sent to Byzantium by Belisarius with Persian captives, II. xix. 24;
 sent to Italy by Justinian, II. xix. 25

Blue Faction, their struggles with the Green Faction, I. xxiv. 2-6;
 favoured by Justinian, II. xi. 32;
 in the Nika insurrection, I. xxiv. 7 ff.;
 also called the "Veneti"

Blue Colonnade, in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 49

Boas River, considered by Procopius the upper portion of the Phasis,
    II. xxix. 14-16

Boes, a Persian general, I. xii. 10

Bolum, fortress in Persarmenia, near which were the gold mines of the
    Persian king, I. xv. 18;
 betrayed to the Romans by Isaac, I. xv. 32, 33;
 its return demanded by Chosroes, I. xxii. 3;
 given up by the Romans, I. xxii. 18

Boraedes, nephew of Justinian, assists in making Hypatius prisoner,
    I. xxiv. 53

Bosporus, a city on the Euxine, I. xii. 7;
 citizens of, put themselves under the sway of Justinus, I. xii. 8;
 Justinian accused of seizing it, II. iii. 40

Bouzes, brother of Coutzes, commander in Lebanon, I. xiii. 5;
 sent to support Belisarius at Mindouos, _ib._;
 commander in Martyropolis, I. xxi. 5;
 at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 19, 25 ff.;
 sent against the Armenians, II. iii. 28;
 his offers of friendship distrusted by them, II. iii. 28, 29;
 slays John treacherously, II. iii. 31;
 shares the command of the East with Belisarius, II. vi. 1;
 makes suggestions as to the defence of Hierapolis, II. vi. 2 ff.;
 abandons the city, II. vi. 7, 8;
 prevents the citizens of Edessa from ransoming the captives of Antioch,
    II. xiii. 6;
 favours invasion of Persia by Belisarius, II. xvi. 16;
 takes refuge with Justus in Hierapolis, II. xx. 20;
 they invite Belisarius to join them, II. xx. 21 ff.;
 but later come to him at Europum, II. xx. 28

Braducius, interpreter of Isdigousnas, II. xxviii. 41

Bronze Gate, in the emperor's palace in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 47

Bulicas, harbour of the Homeritae, I. xix. 21

Byzantium, Nika insurrection, I. xxiv. 1 ff.;
 suburbs ravaged by Huns, II. iv. 4;
 visited by the pestilence, II. xxii. 9 ff.;
 Chosroes contemplates its capture by way of the Euxine, II. xxviii. 23

C[edit]

Cabades, youngest son of Perozes, I. iv. 2;
 chosen king of Persia, I. iv. 34;
 introduces innovations into the Persian government displeasing the people,
    I. v. 1;
 cast into the Prison of Oblivion, I. v. 7;
 escapes from it, I. vi. 7, 8, 10;
 enters Persia with an army of Ephthalitae, I. vi. 10-17;
 appoints Adergoudounbades "chanaranges" I. vi. 15, 18;
 deposes Blases, I. vi. 17;
 institutes a new office, I. vi. 18, 19;
 appeals to Anastasius for a loan, I. vii. 1;
 invades Roman territory, I. vii. 3;
 grants request of Jacobus, the hermit, I. vii. 9-11;
 besieges Amida, I. vii. 12-29;
 captures Amida, I. vii. 29;
 puts Glones in command of the city, I. vii. 33;
 his treatment of the captives of Amida, I. vii. 34;
 routs the Roman armies near Amida, I. viii. 8-19;
 shews kindness to Baradotus by sparing Constantina, II. xiii. 13;
 desirous of capturing Edessa and Constantina, II. xiii. 8;
 abandons his purpose of capturing Edessa, II. xiii. 9 ff.;
 retires in order to meet an invasion of the Huns, I. viii. 19;
 seizes the Caspian Gates, I. x. 12;
 protests at the fortification of Daras, I. x. 16;
 solicitude as to his successor, I. xi. 2 ff.;
 cured by Stephanus of Edessa, II. xxvi. 31;
 hates his oldest son Caoses, I. xi. 3, II. ix. 12;
 requests Justinus to adopt Chosroes, I. xi. 9, 20 ff.;
 unwilling to save Seoses, I. xi. 36, 37;
 tries to force the Iberians to adopt the Persian religion, I. xii. 2 ff.;
 sends an army against them, I. xii. 10;
 sends an army into Roman Armenia, I. xv. 1;
 his gold mine at Pharangium, I. xv. 27;
 deprived of the revenue therefrom, I. xv. 28, 29;
 treats with the ambassador Rufinus at Daras, I. xvi. 1 ff.;
 punishes Perozes, I. xvii. 26 ff.;
 plans a new campaign against the Romans, I. xvii. 29;
 advised by Alamoundaras, I. xvii. 30 ff.;
 adopts the suggestion of Alamoundaras, I. xviii. 1;
 dishonours Azarethes, I. xviii. 51 ff.;
 refuses to negotiate with Hermogenes, I. xxi. 1;
 bought pearl from the Ephthalitae, I. iv. 16;
 his last illness, I. xxi. 17 ff.;
 his ability as a ruler, I. vi. 19

Cabades, son of Zames, plot to set him on the Persian throne in place of
    Chosroes, I. xxiii. 4;
 ordered to be killed by Chosroes, I. xxiii. 7;
 escapes by the help of the chanaranges, I. xxiii. 9 ff.;
 one claiming this name entertained by Justinian in Byzantium,
    I. xxiii. 23, 24

Cadiseni, in the Persian army at the battle of Daras, I. xiv. 38, 39

Caesar, the title used by the Persians to designate the Roman emperor,
    II. xxi. 9, xi. 35

Caesarea, the home of Procopius, I. i. 1

Caisus, a Homerite, of captain's rank, a fugitive because of murder
    committed by him, I. xx. 9, 10

Callinicus, city of Mesopotamia, II. xi. 28;
 on the Euphrates, I. xviii. 13;
 Roman army conveyed thither by boats after the battle on the Euphrates,
    I. xviii. 50;
 taken by Chosroes, II. xxi. 30 ff.

Candidus, priest of Sergiopolis, makes agreement with Chosroes, II. v. 31;
 punished by Chosroes for failing to keep his agreement,
    II. xx. 2 ff., 15, 16

Caoses, oldest son of Cabades, I. xi. 3;
 hated by his father, II. ix. 12;
 claims the throne of Persia upon the death of Cabades, I. xxi. 20;
 prevented by Mebodes from becoming king, I. xxi. 22

Cappadocia, country of Asia embracing a portion of the Taurus, I. x. 1;
 desired by Chosroes, II. xxviii. 23;
 visited by Orestes, I. xvii. 16

Carrhae, city of Mesopotamia, citizens of, offer money to Chosroes,
    II. xiii. 7;
 able to see the smoke of the burning "agger" at Edessa, II. xxvii. 15

Caspian Gates, their location and strategic importance, I. x. 1 ff.;
 fortified by Alexander, I. x. 9;
 offered to Anastasius by Ambazouces, I. x. 10;
 seized by Cabades, I. x. 12, xvi. 4, 7, xxii. 5;
 guarded by the Persians, II. x. 21

Cassandria, known in ancient times as Potidaea, captured by the Huns,
    II. iv. 5

Catholicos, title of the priest of Doubios, II. xxv. 4

Caucasus Mountains, I. xv. 26;
 inhabited by Huns, II. xv. 3, 29, xxviii. 22;
 by Alani, etc., II. xxix. 15;
 barbarians in, held in check by Lazica, II. xxviii. 22

Celer, Roman general, I. viii. 2;
 invades Arzanene, I. viii. 21, II. xv. 7;
 with Patricius and Hypatius besieges Amida, I. ix. 1;
 negotiates a treaty with Aspebedes, I. ix. 24

Celesene, district in Armenia, I. xvii. 11, 21;
 sanctuary of Artemis there, I. xvii. 11

Cerataeum, a district of Antioch, II. x. 7

Chalcis, city in Syria, distance from Gabboulon, I. xviii. 8;
 from Beroea, II. xii. 1;
 saved from Chosroes by money payment, II. xii. 1, 2

Chanaranges (_lit._ "Commander of the Frontier Troops"), Persian
   term for "general," I. v. 4, vi. 12, xxiii. 7

Chanaranges, Persian general, shares command of invading army, I. xxi. 4;
 besieges Martyropolis, I. xxi. 14, 15;
 retires, I. xxi. 27

Cherson, a city at the limits of Roman territory on the Euxine, I. xii. 7

Chersonesus, its wall assailed by the Huns, II. iv. 8

Chorzianene, place in Armenia, Eruli encamp there, II. xxiv. 14

Chosroes, third son of Cabades, I. xi. 5;
 Cabades proposes to Justinus that he adopt Chosroes, I. xi. 6 ff.;
 Ch. awaits outcome of negotiations regarding his adoption by Justinus,
    I. xi. 27;
 retires in anger to Persia, I. xi. 30;
 declared by Cabades in his testament successor to the throne of Persia,
    I. xxi. 17 ff.;
 his election to the kingship, I. xxi. 22;
 meets Roman ambassadors on the Tigris, I. xxii. 1 ff.;
 failure of their negotiations, I. xxii. 12 ff.;
 grants the prayer of Rufinus, I. xxii. 15;
 concludes the "endless peace." I. xxii. 16, 17;
 his unpopularity among the Persians, I. xxiii. 1-3;
 plot to dethrone him, I. xxiii. 3 ff.;
 slays Zames and other male relatives, I. xxiii. 6;
 orders the chanaranges to slay Cabades, son of Zames, I. xxiii. 7;
 hears from Varrames how Cabades had been spared, I. xxiii. 13;
 his punishment of Adergoudounbades, I. xxiii. 14 ff.;
 destroys Mebodes, I. xxiii. 25 ff.;
 vexed at Roman successes in Libya, I. xxvi. 2;
 demands his share of the spoils, I. xxvi. 3;
 desires to break the treaty with the Romans, II. i. 1;
 charges Justinian with having broken the treaty, II. i. 12-14, x. 13, 16;
 hears with favour the ambassadors of Vittigis, II. ii. 12;
 receives an embassy from the Armenians, II. iii. 32 ff.;
 decides to open hostilities against the Romans, II. iii. 55;
 admonished by Justinian by letter, II. iv. 17 ff.;
 detains Anastasius, II. iv. 26;
 dismisses him, II. v. 27;
 first invasion of Roman territory, II. v. 1;
 marches towards Syria, II. v. 4;
 refrains from attacking Zenobia, II. v. 7;
 arriving at Sura, besieges the city, II. v. 8 ff.;
 captures it by a strategem, II. v. 22 ff.;
 marries Euphemia, II. v. 28;
 releases captives for ransom, II. v. 29;
 hears the plea of Megas, II. vi. 18 ff.;
 exacts money from the Hierapolitans, II. vi. 22-24;
 promises to depart from the East for ten centenaria of gold, II. vi. 25;
 demands money from the Beroeans, II. vii. 5;
 enters Beroea and fires a large portion of it, II. vii. 10, 11;
 besieges the acropolis, II. vii. 11 ff.;
 reproached by Megas, II. vii. 19;
 his reply, II. vii. 20 ff.;
 allows the Beroeans to capitulate, II. vii. 35;
 moves against Antioch, II. viii. 1;
 demands money from the citizens of Antioch, II. viii. 4;
 hears the ambassadors, II. viii. 5;
 insulted by the citizens, II. viii. 6;
 storms the city wall, II. viii. 8 ff.;
 captures Antioch, II. viii. 20;
 reproached by Zaberganes, II. viii. 30 ff.;
 addresses the ambassadors, II ix. 1 ff.;
 his hesitation in allowing the Persians to enter Antioch,
    II. viii. 22-24, ix. 7;
 his character II. ix. 8-12;
 orders the plunder of Antioch, II. ix. 14;
 burns the city, II. ix. 17, 18;
 addressed by the ambassadors, II. x. 10 ff.;
 demands money from them, II. x. 19 ff.;
 agrees upon terms for peace, II. x. 24;
 visits Seleucia, II. xi. 1;
 visits Daphne, II. xi. 5 ff.;
 burns the sanctuary of Michael at Daphne, II. xi. 12, 13;
 proceeds to Apamea, II xi. 14;
 enters the city and seizes its treasures, II. xi. 24 ff.;
 becomes a spectator in the hippodrome, II. xi. 31 ff.;
 impales a Persian adulterer, II. xi. 37, 38;
 exacts money from the citizens of Chalcis, II. xii. 1, 2;
 crosses the Euphrates by a bridge, II. xii. 3 ff.;
 eager to capture Edessa because of the belief of the
 Christians that it could not be captured, II. xii. 6 ff., 29, 31;
 demands and receives money from the citizens, II. xii. 33, 34;
 upon receipt of a letter from Justinian prepares for departure,
    II. xiii. 1, 2;
 protests at the offer of money by the citizens of Carrhae, II. xiii. 7;
 accepts money from the citizens of Constantina, II. xiii. 8;
 claims Constantina as his possession by inheritance, _ib._, II. xiii. 15;
 besieges Daras, II. xi. 28, xiii. 16;
 abandons the siege of Daras upon receipt of money, II. xiii. 28;
 charged by Justinian with breaking the treaty, II. xiii. 29;
 provides a home for the captives of Antioch, II. xiv. 1 ff.;
 called in by the Lazi, II. xv. 1, 12 ff.;
 prepares to invade Lazica, II. xv. 31-35;
 Belisarius sent against him, II. xiv. 8;
 invades Lazica, II. xvii. 1 ff.;
 commands an attack to be made on Petra, II. xvii. 4;
 impales Aniabedes, II. xvii. 11;
 besieges Petra, II. xvii. 13 ff.;
 captures Petra, II. xvii. 27;
 retires from Lazica, II. xix. 48;
 third invasion of Roman territory, II. xx. 1 ff.;
 besieges Sergiopolis in vain, II. xx. 11 ff.;
 punishes Candidus, the priest of Sergiopolis, II. xx. 2 ff., 15, 16;
 takes much treasure from Sergiopolis, II. xx. 7;
 sends envoy to Belisarius, II. xxi. 1, 23;
 retires before Belisarius, II. xxi. 15 ff.;
 crosses the Euphrates by a bridge, II. xxi. 21;
 takes Callinicus, II. xi. 28, xxi. 30-32;
 receives the hostage John, II. xxi. 27;
 awaits the Roman envoys at Adarbiganon, II. xxiv. 1 ff.;
 his army visited by the pestilence, II. xxiv. 8, 12;
 retires from Adarbiganon into Assyria, II. xxiv. 12;
 fourth invasion of Roman territory, II. xxvi. 1 ff.;
 makes an attempt upon Edessa, II. xxvi. 5 ff.;
 comes to terms with the citizens of Edessa, II. xxvii. 46;
 arranges a five-year truce with Constantianus and Sergius,
    II. xxviii. 7 ff.;
 lays plans to capture Daras and secure his possession of Lazica,
    II. xxviii. 15 ff.;
 attemps to capture Daras by a ruse, II. xxviii. 31 ff.;
 plans to build a fleet in the Euxine, II. xxix. 1;
 sends Phabrizus into Lazica to destroy Goubazes, II. xxix. 2 ff.;
 sends an army to relieve Petra, II. xxix. 13

Christ, suffered in Jerusalem, II. xi. 14.
 _See_ "Jesus."

Christians, converted two temples into churches, I. xvii. 18;
 boast that Edessa cannot be captured, II. xii. 7;
 reverence especially the feast of Easter, I. xviii. 15;
 the Lazi and Iberians devout Christians, I. xii. 3, II. xxviii. 26;
 among the Homeritae, abused by Jews, I. xx. 1

Cilicia, the refuge of Ephraemius, II. vii. 17;
 and Germanus, II. vii. 18

Cilicians, the objective of Chosroes' invasion, II. v. 4, vi. 21

Cilician screens, used at the siege of Edessa, II. xxvi. 29

Circesiurn, Roman stronghold on the Euphrates, II. v. 2;
 its excellent defences, II. v. 3

Citharizon, fortress in Armenia, four days from Theodosiopolis,
    II. xxiv. 13

Colchis, the old name for Lazica (_q.v._) I. xi. 28, etc.

Comana, called "Golden Comana," a city of Cappadocia founded by Orestes,
    I. xvii. 19

Comana, city in Pontus, founded by Orestes, not the one
    "Among the Taurians," I. xvii. 12

Comet, The, its appearance in the heavens, II. iv. 1, 2;
 various explanations of the meaning of the phenomenon, II. iv. 3

Commagene, old name for Euphratesia, I. xvii. 2, 23, II. xx. 17;
 invaded by the Persians, I. xviii. 2

Constantianus, an Illyrian, II. xxiv. 4;
 envoy to Chosroes with Sergius, II. xxiv. 3;
 appointed general, II. xxviii. 2;
 sent as envoy to Chosroes with Sergius a second time, II. xxviii. 3 ff.

Constantina, city in Mesopotamia, I. xxii. 3;
 distance from Arzamon, I. viii. 10;
 Cabades desirous of capturing the city, II. xiii. 8;
 spared by Cabades owing to the entreaties of Baradotus, II. xiii. 13 ff.;
 claimed by Chosroes as an inherited possession, II. xiii. 8, 15;
 citizens of, their offer of money accepted by Chosroes, II. xiii. 8

Constantine, Forum of, in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 9, 24

Coutzes, Roman general, brother of Bouzes, sent to support Belisarius at
    Mindouos, I. xiii. 5;
 captured by the Persians, I. xiii. 8

Ctesiphon, town on the Tigris, II. xxviii. 4-5;
 distance from the Antioch of Chosroes, II. xiv. 1

Cyril, Roman commander at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 21

Cyrus, king of the Persians, II. ii. 15

Cyzicus, John the Cappadocian exiled thither, I. xxv. 31

D[edit]


Dagaris, a Roman spy, captured by Huns, I. xv. 6;
 returned to the Romans, I. xxii. 18;
 his later services to the Romans, I. xxii. 19

Dagisthaeus, commands an army to succour the Lazi, II. xxix. 10;
 with Goubazes besieges Petra, II. xxix. 11 ff.;
 sends an insufficient force to guard the pass into Lazica,
    II. xxix. 33-34;
 his incompetent conduct of the siege of Petra, II. xxix. 34 ff.;
 deceived by Mirranes, II. xxx. 7;
 abandons Petra, II. xxx. 11;
 with Phoubelis attacks Mermeroes, II. xxx. 22;
 with Goubazes attacks and almost annihilates the Persians,
    II. xxx. 39 ff.

Daphne, suburb of Antioch, II viii. 25;
 visited by Chosroes, II. xi. 5 ff.;
 the portent of the uprooted cypresses, II. xiv. 5

Daras, a city in Mesopotamia, fortified by Anastasius, I. x. 13;
 distance from Nisibis and the Persian boundary, I. x. 14;
 from Ammodius, I. xiii. 15;
 its formidable defences, II. xiii. 17;
 a menace to the Persians, I. xvi. 6;
 battle of, I. xiii. 12 ff.;
 the Persians demand that its walls be demolished, I. xvi. 7;
 its abandonment by the Roman army a condition of the "endless peace,"
    I. xxii. 16;
 the tyranny of John, I. xxvi. 5-12;
 besieged by Chosroes, II. xi. 28, xiii. 16 ff.;
 citizens of, make a settlement with Chosroes, II. xiii. 28;
 Chosroes plans to capture it by a ruse, II. xxviii. 17;
 failure of the attempt, II. xxviii. 31 ff.

Death, Gate of, in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 52

Diocletian, Roman emperor, readjusts the Roman boundary in Aegypt,
    I. xix. 29 ff.;
 builds the fortress of Philae, I. xix. 34, 35

Diogenes, a guardsman, commander of cavalry, II. xxi. 2, 18, 20

Domentiolus commands a detachment of an army to invade Persia,
    II. xxiv. 15

Dorotheus, a Roman commander at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 21

Dorotheus, general of Armenia, attacks invading Persian army,
   I. xv. 3 ff.;
 makes a sally from Satala upon the Persian army, I. xv. 11 ff.

Doubios, district in Persarmenia, II. xxv. 1, 2;
 its trade with India, II. xxv. 3;
 distance from Theodosiopolis, II. xxv. 1;
 Mermeroes stops there with his army II. xxx. 33;
 priest of, called Catholicos, II. xxv. 4;
 sent to urge the Romans to make peace, II. xxiv. 6, 7

E[edit]


Easter, its especial observance by the Christians, I. xviii. 15

Edessa, the centre of so-called Osroene, I. xvii. 24;
 in Mesopotamia, II. xxiv. 4;
 Augustus promises to build a hippodrome in the city, II. xii. 18;
 the story of its toparch Augarus, II. xii. 8 ff.;
 citizens of, convinced that the city could not be captured by barbarians,
    II. xii. 7, 26, 30;
 the letter of Christ to Augarus inscribed on the city wall, II. xii. 26;
 given over to the Persians by the son of Augarus, II. xii. 28;
 citizens of, destroy the Persian guards and give back the city to the
    Romans, II. xii. 29;
 citizens pay Chosroes two centenaria, II. xii. 34;
 their zeal to ransom the captives of Antioch frustrated by Bouzes,
    II. xiii. 3 ff.;
 Cabades desirous of capturing the city, II. xii. 6, 7, 31, xiii. 8;
 abandons his purpose upon reaching it, II. xiii. 9 ff.;
 attacked by Chosroes, II. xxvi. 5 ff.;
 the home of Sergius, II. xxiv. 4


Eirenaeus, Roman general, sent to Lazica, I. xii. 14

Elephantina, city in Aegypt, on the Roman boundary, I. xix. 27;
 near Philae, I. xix. 34, 35

Endielon, place near Amida, I. vii. 5

Ephraemius, chief priest of Antioch, accused of treason by
 Julian, II. vii. 16;
 retires to Cilicia, II. vii. 17

Ephthalitae Huns, called White Huns, their manners and customs,
    I. iii. 1, 2;
 wage war with Perozes, I. iii. 1 ff.;
 entrap the Persian army, I. iii. 8 ff.;
 in a second war with Perozes completely destroy his army, I. iv. 1 ff.;
 force the Persians to pay tribute, I. iv. 35;
 receive Cabades after his escape from the Prison of Oblivion, I. vi. 10;
 Cabades owes their king money, I. vii. 1, 2;
 punished for impiety towards Jacobus, the hermit, I. vii. 8;
 eight hundred Eph. killed by the Persians, I. viii. 13

Eruli, accustomed to fight without protective armour except a shield,
    II. xxv. 27, 28;
 in the Roman army, II. xxi. 4;
 in the Roman army at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 19, xiv. 33, 39;
 under Mundus, I. xxiv. 41;
 in the army of Valerianus, II. xxiv. 12;
 with the army of Martinus, II. xxiv. 14;
 follow Peter into Persia, II. xxiv. 18;
 in the battle of Anglon, II. xxv. 20 ff.

Esimiphaeus, established as king of the Homeritae, I. xx. 1;
 deposed by insurgents, I. xx. 3;
 makes idle promise to Justinian, I. xx. 9 ff.

Euphemia, daughter of John the Cappadocian I. xxv. 13

Euphemia, captive of Sura, married by Chosroes, II. v. 28

Euphratesia, ancient name of Commagene I. xvii. 2, 23, II. xx. 17, 20;
 chosen by Azarethes as the starting point for an invasion of Roman
    territory, I. xvii. 2

Euphrates River, its source in Armenia, I. xvii. 4;
 disappears in a strange marsh, I. xvii. 6 ff.;
 its course from Celesene as far as the junction with the Tigris,
    I. xvii. 21, 22;
 receives the waters of the Aborrhas, II. v. 2;
 protects one side of Circesium, _ib._;
 important battle on its banks, I. xviii. 30 ff.

Europe, invaded by the Huns, II. iv. 4 ff.

Europum, on the Euphrates, headquarters of Belisarius while
 recruiting his army, II. xx. 24, 27, 28

Eusebius, Roman ambassador to the Persian king Perozes, I. iii. 8;
 warns Perozes of the stratagem of the Ephthalitae I. iii. 13

Eusebius, bishop of Cyzicus, murdered by the citizens, I. xxv. 37, 38

Euxine Sea, receives the waters of the Phasis, II. xxix. 18;
 Chosroes desires an outlet to it, II. xxviii. 23

Evaris, builder of a temple of Michael at Tretum, near Antioch, II. xi. 7

F[edit]


Florentinus, a Thracian, distinguishes himself at the battle of Satala,
    I. xv. 15, 16

G[edit]


Gabalas, a Saracen, father of Arethas, I. xvii. 47

Galatians, on the Euxine, II. xxviii. 23

Gabboulon, distance from Chalcis, I. xviii. 8

Gaza, limit of Arabia in olden times, I. xix. 20

Gelimer, brought captive to Byzantium by Belisarius, II. xxi. 28

George, confidant of Belisarius, persuades the inhabitants of Sisauranon
   to capitulate, II. xix. 22, 23;
 saves the city of Daras, II. xxviii. 33 f.

Germanus, nephew of Justinian, II. vi. 9;
 commander at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 21;
 sent to meet the invasion of Chosroes, II. vi. 9;
 establishes himself In Antioch and inspects the fortifications,
    II. vi. 10;
 retires into Cilicia, II. vii. 18

Glones, a Persian, in command of the garrison in Amida, I. vii. 33;
 destroyed by a stratagem, I. ix. 5-17;
 son of, I. ix. 4, 18

Godidisklus, a Goth, an officer in the Roman army, I. viii. 3

Gorgo, city of the Ephthalitae, against the Persian frontier,
    I. iii. 2, iv. 10

Goths, march with Belisarius against Chosroes,
    II. xiv. 10, xviii. 24, xxi. 4

Goubazes, king of Lazica, privy councillor of Justinian _in absentia_,
    II. xxix. 31;
 gives himself and his people over to Chosroes, II. xvii. 2 ff.;
 plotted against by Phabrizus, II. xxix. 2 ff.;
 begs Justinian to succour the Lazi, II. xxix. 9;
 with Dagisthaeus besieges Petra, II. xxix. 11 ff.;
 defends one pass against the Persians, II. xxix. 28 ff.;
 asks Justinian to send money to the Alani and the Sabeiri, II. xxix. 30;
 Chosroes plans to put him out of the way, II. xxviii. 30, xxix. 2 ff.;
 rewarded with money by Justinian, II. xxx. 28;
 with Dagisthaeus attacks and almost annihilates the Persians,
    II. xxx. 39 ff.

Gourgenes, king of Iberia, revolts from the Persians,
    I. xii. 4 ff., II. xv. 6, xxviii. 20;
 retires before the Persian army into Lazica, I. xii. 11, 12

Gousanastades, "chanaranges," counsels the execution of Cabades, I. v. 4;
 put to death by Cabades, I. vi. 18

Greece, plundered by the Huns, II. iv. 11

Greeks, The, I. xix. 35

Green Faction, their struggles with the Blue Faction, I. xxiv. 2-6;
 in the Nika insurrection, I. xxiv. 7 ff.;
 favoured by Chosroes at Apamea, II. xi. 32

H[edit]


Hebrews, of Iotabe, formerly autonomous, become subject to the Romans,
    I. xix. 4

Helen, palace named from, in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 30

Hellenic faith, The, I. xx. 1, xxv. 10

Hellestheaeus, king of the Aethiopians, his expeditions against the
    Homeritae, I. xx. 1 ff.;
 his vain promises to Justinian, I. xx. 9 ff.

Hermogenes, Roman general, sent to assist Belisarius, I. xiii. 10;
 in company with Belisarius prepares to meet the Persians at Daras,
    I. xiii. 12 ff.;
 at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 19 ff.;
 forbids Andreas to engage in single combat, I. xiii. 35;
 interchange of letters with Perozes, I. xiv. 1 ff.;
 address to the troops, I. xiv. 20 ff.;
 arrays the army on the second day of the battle of Daras, I. xiv. 28;
 at the battle of Daras, I. xiv. 44;
 recalls Romans from pursuit of the Persians, I. xiv. 53;
 returns to Byzantium, I. xvi. 10;
 sent as ambassador by the emperor, I. xviii. 16;
 negotiates unsuccessfully with Chosroes, I. xxi. 1;
 accompanies the army of Sittas as ambassador, I. xxi. 10, 23;
 ambassador to Chosroes with Rufinus, I. xxii. 16

Hestia, _i.e._ Vesta, identified with the Persian
 fire-divinity, II. xxiv. 2

Hierapolis, city on the Euphrates, I. xiii. 11, xvii. 22;
 distance from Beroea and Antioch, II. vii. 2;
 Bouzes and the Roman army stationed there, II. vi. 2;
 suggested plan for its defence, II. vi. 3 ff.;
 deserted by Bouzes, II. vi. 7, 8;
 saved from Chosroes by payment of money, II. vi. 22-24;
 Justus and Bouzes take refuge there, II. xx. 20

Homeric bowmen, compared with bowmen of Procopius' time, I. i. 9-11

Homeritae, people of Arabia, sought as allies by Justinian,
    I. xix. 1, xx. 9 ff.;
 location of their country, I. xix. 15;
 domestic conflicts and intervention of Hellestheaeus, I. xx. 1 ff.

Honorius, Emperor of the West, uncle of Theodosius II. unable to assist
    him, I. ii. 4

Huns, a nomadic people, of ugly countenance, I. iii. 4;
 their homes, I. x. 6, xii. 7, II. xv. 3, xxviii. 22;
 their war with Cabades, I. viii. 19, ix. 24, x. 15, II. xvi. 3;
 Justinian attempts to win their support, II. i. 14, iii. 47, x. 16;
 capture a Roman spy I. xv. 6;
 attack of, feared by the Persians at Martyropolis, I. xxi. 27;
 invade Roman territory, I. xxi. 28;
 often defeated by Dagaris, I. xxii. 19;
 receiving annual payments from the Romans, II. x. 23;
 held back by the Lazi, II. xv. 3;
 in the army of Chosroes, II. xxvi. 5;
 assist the Romans in the defence of Edessa, II. xxvi. 25, 26;
 invade Europe, II. iv. 4 ff.;
 cross the Hellespont into Asia, II. iv. 9;
 plunder Illyricum and Thessaly and Greece as far as the Isthmus,
    II. iv. 10-12

Hypatius, nephew of Anastasius, I. viii. 2;
 army routed by Cabades, I. viii. 10-18;
 his escape, I. viii. 19;
 sent as envoy to the Persians, I. xi. 24;
 slandered by Rufinus, I. xi. 38;
 his punishment, I. xi. 39;
 sent from the palace by Justinian, I. xxiv. 19-21;
 declared emperor by the populace, and conducted to the hippodrome,
    I. xxiv. 22 f.;
 his wife Mary, I. xxiv. 23;
 takes the emperor's seat in the hippodrome, I. xxiv. 42;
 brought before Justinian as a prisoner, I. xxiv. 53;
 meets his death bravely, I. xxiv. 55, 56

I[edit]


Iberia, Iberians, a Christian people, side with the Romans,
    I. xii. 2 ff., II. xv. 6;
 come to Byzantium, I. xii. 14;
 given choice of remaining in Byzantium or returning to their homes,
    I. xxii. 16;
 dissatisfied with Persian rule, II. xxviii. 20, 21


Ildiger, in the army of Martinus, II. xxiv. 13

Illyricum, invaded by the Huns, II. iv. 5, 10

Immortals, a detachment of the Persian army, I. xiv. 31;
 at the battle of Daras, I. xiv. 44 ff.

India, washed by the "Red Sea," I. xix. 3;
 boats in, tale to account for their construction without iron,
    I. xix. 23, 24;
 iron not produced there nor imported from elsewhere, I. xix. 24-26;
 silk export, I. xx. 9, 12;
 its trade with Doubios, II. xxv. 3

Ionian Gulf, II. iv. 4

Iotabe, an Island In the "Red Sea," I. xix. 3

Iphigenia, the story of her flight from the sanctuary of Artemis,
    I. xvii. 11 ff.;
 temple dedicated to her by Orestes, I. xvii. 18

Iris River, in Pontus, I. xvii. 14

Isaac, brother of Narses, betrays Bolum to the Romans and comes as a
    deserter to Byzantium, I. xv. 32, 33;
 commander in Armenia, II. xxiv. 14;
 carries his brother Narses out of the battle of Anglon, II. xxv. 24

Isaurians, in the Roman army, I. xviii. 5;
 commanded by Longinus and Stephanacius, I. xviii. 7;
 at the battle on the Euphrates, I. xviii. 38;
 their inexperience in war, I. xviii. 39

Isdigerdes, Persian king, guardian of Theodosius I. ii. 7 ff.

Isdigousnas, high Persian official, II. xxviii. 16;
 employed by Chosroes for the furtherance of his plans, II. xxviii. 17;
 attempts to capture Daras for Chosroes by a ruse, II. xxviii. 31 ff.;
 continues to Byzantium as an envoy, II. xxviii. 38 ff.

Isis, worshipped by the Blemyes and Nobatae, I. xix. 35

Italy, subdued by Belisarius, II. i. 1

J[edit]


Jacobus, a holy man among the Syrians, I. vii. 5 ff.

Jason, the tale of his adventure with Medea in Colchis, II. xvii. 2

Jerusalem, the scene of Christ's suffering, II. xi. 14;
 its treasures desired by Chosroes, II. xx. 18

Jesus, his life and work in Palestine, II. xii. 22, 23;
 invited by Augarus to come to Edessa, II. xii. 24;
 his reply, in which he promises health to Augarus, II. xii. 25.
 _See also_ "Christ."

Jews, oppress the Christians among the Homeritae, I. xx. 1.
 _See also_ "Hebrews."

John, father of Artabanes, of the Arsacidae, II. iii. 25;
 treacherously slain by Bouzes, II. iii. 29-31

John, son of Basilius, a notable of Edessa, given as a hostage to Chosroes,
    I. xxi. 27, 33

John, an Armenian, son of Thomas Gouzes, in the Roman army, II. xxx. 4

John the Cappadocian, praetorian prefect, I. xxiv. 11;
 his character and ability, I. xxiv. 12-15, xxv. 8-10;
 highly esteemed by Justinian, I. xxv. 5, 25, 33;
 dismissed from office, I. xxiv. 17;
 restored to office, I. xxv. 1;
 hated by Theodora, I. xxv. 4-7;
 hostility to Belisarius, I. xxv. 12;
 entrapped by Antonina, I. xxv. 13 ff.;
 forced to become a priest and exiled to Cyzicus, I. xxv. 31;
 looks forward confidently to becoming emperor, I. xxv. 8, 19, 44,
    II. xxx. 50;
 his easy lot in Cyzicus, I. xxv. 34, 35;
 accused of the murder of Eusebius, I. xxv. 39;
 his treatment at the trial, I. xxv. 40;
 his punishment, I. xxv. 42, 43;
 imprisoned in the city of Antinous in Aegypt, I. xxv. 43;
 returns to Byzantium, II. xxx. 49, 50;
 the grotesque fulfilment of his dreams, II. xxx. 54;
 his daughter Euphemia, I. xxv. 13

John, son of Lucas, Roman officer, captured by Alamoundaras,
    I. xvii. 43, 44

John, commander of troops in Mesopotamia, arrests the interpreter of
    Vittigis' envoys, II. xiv. 12;
 attacked by the Persians before Nisibis, II. xviii. 16

John, son of Nicetas, Roman commander at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 21;
 urges Belisarius to retire from Mesopotamia, II. xix. 36 ff.;
 commands a detachment of an army to invade Persia, II. xxiv. 15

John, son of Rufinus, sent as ambassador to Chosroes,
  II. vii. 15, ix. 1, x. 10, 18 ff.

John Tzibus, governor of Lazica, his origin and character, II. xv. 9;
 persuades Justinian to build Petra, II. xv. 10;
 monopolises the retail trade, II. xv. 11, xxix. 21;
 valiantly defends Petra, II. xvii. 5 ff.;
 killed by a missile, II. xvii. 16

John, serving in the Roman infantry, his tyranny at Daras, I. xxvi. 5-12;
 his death, I. xxvi. 12

John the Glutton, a guardsman, sent with Arethas into Assyria,
    II. xix. 15 ff.;
 commands a detachment in an army to invade Persia, II. xxiv. 15

Julian, sanctuary of, in Antioch, II. x. 8

Julian, brother of Summas, envoy to the Aethiopians and Homeritae,
    I. xx. 9, II. i. 10;
 private secretary of Justinian, sent as ambassador to Chosroes,
    II. vii. 15;
 forbids giving money to Chosroes and denounces Ephraemius, II. vii. 16

Justinian, nephew of Justinus, I. xi. 10;
 his great love for his wife Theodora, I. xxv. 4;
 favours adoption of Chosroes by his uncle Justinus, I. xi. 10;
 as general, I. xi. 16, xii. 21;
 becomes emperor upon the death of Justinus, I. xiii. 1;
 orders the building of a fort in Mindouos, I. xiii. 2;
 appoints Belisarius General of the East, I. xiii. 9;
 makes Arethas commander of many tribes, I. xvii. 47;
 pits Arethas against Alamoundaras, I. xvii. 47, 48;
 orders demolition of Philae, I. xix. 36;
 endeavours to secure the alliance of the Aethiopians and Homeritae,
    I. xix. 1, xx. 9 ff.;
 receives the Palm Groves as a present from Abochorabus, I. xix. 10 ff.;
 recalls Belisarius and sends Sittas to the East, I. xxi. 2, 3;
 receives information from a Persian spy, I. xxi. 13;
 concludes the "endless peace," I. xxii. 16;
 receives in Byzantium the Cabades who claimed to be the son of Zames,
    I. xxiii. 24;
 his conduct during the Nika insurrection, I. xxiv. 10 ff.;
 his affection for John the Cappadocian, I. xxv. 5, 25, 33;
 denounced by the Armenian embassy before Chosroes, II. iii. 37 ff.;
 refuses to sanction treaty, II. xiii. 29;
 summons Belisarius from Italy and sends him against Chosroes, II. xiv. 8;
 commands Belisarius to invade Persia, II. xvi. 5;
 sends him again against Chosroes, II. xx. 20;
 summons Belisarius from the East in order to send him to Italy,
    II. xxi. 34;
 takes measures for the relief of the victims of the pestilence,
    II. xxiii. 5 ff.;
 attacked by the pestilence, II. xxiii. 20;
 orders Valerianus and Martinus with others to invade Persia,
    II. xxiv. 10;
 appoints Marcellus and Constantianus generals, II. xxviii. 2;
 sanctions the five-year peace, II. xxviii. 11;
 receives Isdigousnas with especial honour, II. xxviii. 38 ff.;
 sends succour to the Lazi, II. xxix. 10;
 neglects to send money requested by Goubazes, II. xxix. 30-32;
 finally sends the money for the Sabeiri, and gifts of money to Goubazes,
    II. xxx. 28;
 sends John Tzibus to Lazica, II. xv. 9;
 founds Petra in Lazica, II. xv. 10, xxix. 20;
 makes a present of money to Chosroes, I. xxvi. 4;
 considers the question of Strata, II. i. 7 ff.;
 accused of tampering with Alamoundaras, II. i. 12-14, iii. 47, x. 16;
 advises Chosroes not to wage war, II. iv. 17 ff.;
 sends Germanus to Syria, II. vi. 9;
 sends ambassadors to Chosroes, II. vii. 15;
 favours the Green Faction, II. xi. 32;
 writes to Chosroes, II. xiii. 1;
 the years of his reign noted, I. xvi. 10, xxii. 17,
   II. iii. 56, v. 1, xxviii. 11, xxx. 48

Justinus, uncle of Justinian, I. xi. 10;
 an officer in the Roman army, I. viii. 3;
 becomes emperor, I. xi. 1;
 declines to adopt Chosroes, I. xi. 6 ff.;
 reduces Hypatius from authority, I. xi. 39;
 captures Peter of Arzanene during Celer's invasion, II. xv. 7;
 supports the Iberians in their revolt from the Persians, I. xii. 5 ff.;
 makes Justinian partner in the royal power, I. xii. 21;
 appoints Procopius adviser to Belisarius, I. xii. 24;
 his death, I. xiii. 1

Justus, nephew of Justinian, assists in making Hypatius prisoner,
    I. xxiv. 53;
 takes refuge with Bouzes in Hierapolis II. xx. 20;
 they invite Belisarius to join them, II. xx. 21 ff.;
 but later come to him in Europum, II. xx. 28;
 commands a detachment of an army to invade Persia, II. xxiv. 15;
 invades Persia apart from the other commanders, II. xxiv. 20;
 invades the country about Taraunon with Peranius, II. xxv. 35;
 his death, II. xxviii. 1

L[edit]


Lazica, Lazi, later names for Colchis and Colchi (_q.v._), I. xi. 28;
 its cities, II. xxix. 18;
 an unproductive country, I. xii. 17 II. xxviii. 27;
 imported salt and other necessities of life, II. xv. 5, xxviii. 27;
 many fortresses there, II. xxx. 27;
 difficult to traverse, II. xxix. 24, 25;
 bulwark against the barbarians of the Caucasus, II. xxviii. 22;
 its importance to Persia, II. xxviii. 18 ff.;
 the scene of the story of Jason and Medea, II. xvii. 2;
 the Lazi in ancient times allies of the Persians, II. xv. 15;
 become allies of the Romans, II. xv. 16;
 the people Christian, II. xxviii. 26;
 Lazica claimed by the Persians, I. xi. 28;
 forts of, abandoned by the Romans and occupied by the Persians,
    I. xii. 19;
 Chosroes refuses to return them to the Romans, I. xxii. 3;
 finally given up by the Persians, I. xxii. 18;
 invaded by Chosroes, I. xxiii. 12, II. xv. 1, xvii. 1 ff.;
 limited subjection of the Lazi to the Romans, II. xv. 2-4;
 placed under a Roman magistrate, II. iii. 39;
 become discontented by reason of Roman misrule, II. xv. 6 ff.;
 appeal to Chosroes, II. xv. 1, 12 ff.;
 demanded from Chosroes by the Roman envoys, II. xxviii. 6;
 Chosroes plans to populate it with Persians, II. xxviii. 17;
 Lazi hostile to Persian rule, II. xxviii. 25

Lebanon, I. xiii. 5, II. viii. 2, xvi. 17, xix. 33

Libelarius of Thrace, Roman general, invades Mesopotamia, I. xii. 23;
 reduced from office, I. xii. 24

Libyans, II. iii. 42

Ligurians, envoys of Vittigis to Chosroes, II. ii. 1

Longinus, commander of Isaurians, I. xviii. 7

Lucas, father of John, I. xvii. 44

Lycaones, in the army of Belisarius, I. xviii. 40

M[edit]


Macedonians, founders of Seleucia and Ctesiphon, II. xxviii. 4

Maddeni, tribe of Saracens in Arabia, subject to the Homeritae,
    I. xix. 14, I. xx. 9

Magi, advise Perozes to deceive the Ephthalitae, I. iii. 18 ff.;
 entrap Arsaces, I. v. 19 ff.;
 advice to Cabades at the siege of Amida, I. vii. 19;
 announce to Chosroes that he will capture Sura, II. v. 9;
 answer Cabades' enquiry with regard to Edessa, II. xiii. 9, 10;
 guardians of the fire-sanctuary, II. xxiv. 2

Mamas, priest of Daras, assists in overthrowing the tyranny of John,
    I. xxvi. 8

Marcellus, nephew of Justinian, appointed general, II. xxviii. 2

Marcellus, Roman commander at the battle of Daras I. xiii. 21;
 commander of palace guards, sent by Theodora to assassinate John the
    Cappadocian, I. xxv. 24 ff.;
 wounded in the encounter, I. xxv. 29

Martinus, given as a hostage to the Persians, I. xxi. 27;
 sent to the East, II. xiv. 9;
 defends Daras against Chosroes, II. xiii. 16 ff.;
 ordered to invade Persia with Valerianus, II., xxiv. 10;
 General of the East, encamps at Citharizon, II. xxiv. 13;
 follows Peter in invading Persia, II. xxiv. 19;
 commands the centre at the battle of Anglon II. xxv. 17;
 with Peter and Peranius defends Edessa against Chosroes, II. xxvi. 25 ff.;
 deceived by the Persian commanders, II. xxvi. 44 ff., xxvii. 5, 6;
 arranges a settlement with Chosroes, II. xxvii. 45, 46

Martyropolis, near the River Nymphius, I. viii. 22;
 distance from Amida, I. xxi. 6;
 besieged by the Persians, I. xxi. 5 ff.;
 fears of Sittas and Hermogenes concerning its safety, I. xxi. 23;
 siege abandoned by the Persians, I. xxi. 27;
 near Phison, II. xxiv. 15

Mary, wife of Hypatius, tries to prevent her husband from going to the
    hippodrome, I. xxiv. 23, 24

Massagetae, reported to be preparing to join the Persians, I. xxi. 13.
 _See also_"Huns"

Mebodes, a Persian official, sent as envoy to the Romans, I. xi. 25;
 slanders Seoses, I. xi. 31;
 persuades Cabades to leave a written declaration concerning
 Chosroes, I. xxi. 17-19;
 opposes the claim of Caoses, I. xxi. 20;
 secures the election of Chosroes as king, I. xxi. 22;
 his tragic death, I. xxiii. 25 ff.

Medea, the tale of her adventure with Jason in Colchis, II. xvii. 2

Medes, the name used by Procopius as an equivalent for "Persians"
 (_q.v._)

Medic garments, called to Procopius' time "seric," I. xx. 9

Megas, bishop of Beroea, sent to Chosroes, II. vi. 17;
 begs him to spare the Roman cities, II. vi. 18 ff.;
 goes to Antioch, II. vii. 1;
 fails to persuade the citizens of Antioch to pay money to Chosroes,
    II. vii. 14;
 his conference with Chosroes at Beroea, II. vii. 19 ff.

Melitene, chief city of Armenia Minor, I. xvii. 22

Mermeroes, Persian general, invades Roman Armenia, I. xv. 1 ff.;
 driven back by Dorotheus and Sittas, I. xv. 8;
 invades Roman territory a second time, I. xv. 9;
 defeated at Satala, I. xv. 12 ff.;
 shares command of an invading army, I. xxi. 4;
 lends an army to the relief of Petra, II. xxix. 13, xxx. 1 ff.;
 forces the pass into Iberia, II. xxx. 8-10;
 reaches Petra, II. xxx. 15;
 taunts the Romans, II. xxx. 17;
 leaving a garrison in Petra, starts back, II. xxx. 20;
 attacked by Phoubelis and Goubazes, II. xxx. 22;
 departs from Lazica with the greater part of his army, II. xxx. 32, 33

Mesopotamia, bounded by the Tigris and the Euphrates, I. xvii. 23;
 its hot climate, II. xix. 31;
 Persians accustomed to invade Roman territory from here, I. xvii. 25;
 avoided by invading Persian army, I. xvii. 2;
 invaded by the Persians, I. xxi. 4 ff.

Michael, sanctuary of, in Daphne, burned by Chosroes, II. xi. 6, 12, 13;
 temple of, at Tretum, II. xi. 7, 13

Mindouos, place near the Persian border, Justinian attempts to fortify it,
  I. xiii. 2, xvi. 7

Mirranes, a Persian term (_lit._ "Mithra-son," denoting properly, not an
    office, but a patrician family); _see_ Perozes 2;
 also, commander in Petra, deceives Dagisthaeus, II. xxx. 7

Mocheresis, important city of Lazica, II. xxix. 18

Molatzes, commander of troops in Lebanon, brings succour to Antioch,
    II. viii. 2;
 flees precipitately with the soldiers, II. viii. 17-19

Monks, distinguished for piety, I. vii. 22, 24

Moors, II. ii. 8, iii. 46

Mopsuestia, a city of Cilicia, II. x. 2

Mundus, general in Illyricum, assists in quelling the Nika insurrection,
    I. xxiv. 40 ff.

N[edit]



Nabedes, commander of the Persian soldiers in Nisibis, II. xviii. 9;
 attacks the Roman troops before the city, II. xviii. 19 ff.;
 general in Persarmenia, takes measures to urge the Romans toward
   making peace, II. xxiv. 6;
 takes up his position in Anglon, II. xxv. 6;
 defeats the Roman armies, II. xxv. 20 ff.

Narses, a Persarmenian, the emperor's steward, receives
 Narses and Aratius when they desert to the Romans, I. xv. 31;
 a eunuch, I. xxv. 24;
 sent by Theodora to assist in the assassination of John the Cappadocian,
    _ib._;
 overhears his conversation with Antonina, I. xxv. 26

Narses, a Persarmenian, in company with Aratius defeats Sittas and
    Belisarius, I. xii. 21, 22;
 deserts to the Romans, I. xv. 31;
 dismantles the sanctuaries in Philae at Justinian's order, I. xix. 37;
 encamps with Valerianus near Theodosiopolis, II. xxiv. 12;
 leads the attack at Anglon, II. xxv. 20;
 dies bravely, II. xxv. 24;
 brother of Isaac, II. xxiv. 14

Nicetas, father of the general John, I. xiii. 21, II. xix. 36, xxiv. 15

Nika insurrection, in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 1 ff.;
 significance of the name, I. xxiv. 10

Nile River, the Nobatae dwell along its banks, I. xix. 28, 29;
 the island of Philae in it, I. xix. 34

Nisibis, distance from the Tigris, I. xi. 27;
 from Daras, I. x. 14;
 from Sisauranon, II. xix. 2;
 bulwark of the Persian empire, II. xviii. 7;
 its capture by the Persians, I. xvii. 25;
 its territory invaded by Libelarius, I. xii. 23;
 by Belisarius, II. xviii. 1 ff.;
 negotiations with Chosroes there, I. xxii. 10

Nobatae, a people of upper Aegypt, I. xix. 28;
 settled along the Nile by Diocletian, I. xix. 29 ff.;
 receive annual payment from the Roman emperor, I. xix. 32, 33;
 their religion, I. xix. 35

Nymphius River, near Martyropolis, I. viii. 22, xxi. 6;
 forms boundary between the Roman and Persian territory, I. xxi. 6;
 boundary of Arzanene, I. viii. 21, II. xv. 7

O[edit]


Oasis, city in upper Aegypt, former home of the Nobatae, I. xix. 30

Obbane, on the Euphrates, distance from Barbalissum, II. xii. 4

Octava, place in Armenia, distance from Satala, I. xv. 9

Odonathus, ruler of the Saracens, husband of Zenobia, II. v. 5;
 his services to the Romans, II. v. 6

Oenochalakon, place in Armenia, II. iii. 15

Olyvrius, emperor of the West, father-in-law of Areobindus, I. viii. 1

Orestes, the story of his flight from Tauris, I. xvii. 11 ff.

Origenes, a senator, counsels moderation, I. xxiv. 26 ff.

Orocasius, highest part of the city of Antioch, II. vi. 10

Orontes River, flows along by Antioch, II. vi. 10, viii. 3, 35

Osiris, worshipped by the Blemyes and Nobatae, I. xix. 35

Osroene, name applied to country about Edessa, I. xvii. 24;
 its strongly fortified cities, I. xvii. 34

Osroes, ancient king of Edessa, I. xvii. 24

P[edit]


Pacurius, king of Persia at the time of the truceless war with the
    Armenians, I. v. 10;
 entraps Arsaces, I. v. 16 ff.;
 confines Arsaces in the Prison of Oblivion, I. v. 29;
 flays Bassicius, I. v. 28;
 grants favour to a friend of Arsaces, I. v. 30 ff.

Palestine, bounded by the "Red Sea," I. xix. 2;
 Saracens dwelling in it, I. xix. 10;
 the objective of Chosroes' third invasion, II. xx. 18;
 visited by the pestilence, II. xxii. 6

Palm Groves, held by Saracens of Arabia, I. xix. 8, 9, II. iii. 41;
 presented to Justinian, I. xix. 10 ff.

Palmyra, city of Phoenicia, II. i. 6

Parthians, their connection with the first Arsaces, II. iii. 32

Patriciolus, an officer in the Roman army, I. viii. 3

Patricias, the Phrygian, Roman general, I. viii. 2;
 his army routed by Cabades, I. viii. 10-18;
 his escape, I. viii. 19;
 entraps Glones with two hundred Persians, I. ix. 5-18

Paulus, interpreter of Chosroes, II. vi. 22;
 a Roman reared in Antioch, II. vi. 23;
 presents the Persian demands at Hierapolis, II. vi. 22;
 at Beroea, II. vii. 5;
 at Antioch, II. viii. 4;
 where he exhorts the citizens to abstain from their folly, II. viii. 7;
 at Chalcis, II. xii. 1;
 at Edessa, II. xii. 33;
 a second time at Edessa, II. xxvi. 14, xxvii. 24, 45

Pearl, story of the, I. iv. 17-31

Peloponnesus, escapes plunder by the Huns, II. iv. 11

Pelusium, in Aegypt, the starting point of the pestilence, II. xxii. 6

Peranius, son of Gourgenes, king of Iberia, I. xii. 11;
 commands a detachment of an army to invade Persia, II. xxiv. 15;
 invades the country about Taraunon with Justus, II. xxv. 35;
 with Peter and Martinus defends Edessa against
 Chosroes, II. xxvi. 25 ff., xxvii. 42;
 Chosroes demands that he and Peter be surrendered to him, II. xxvi. 38;
 his death, II. xxviii. 1

Perozes, Persian king, wages war against the Ephthalitae, I. iii. 1, 8;
 entrapped by the Ephthalitae, I. iii. 10 ff.;
 escapes with his army, I. iii. 22;
 his second expedition, I. iv. 1 ff.;
 destroyed with his army by the Ephthalitae, I. iv. 14 ff.;
 his famous pearl, I. iv. 14

Perozes, Persian general, I. xiii. 16;
 interchange of letters with Belisarius and Hermogenes, I. xiv. 1 ff.;
 address to his troops, I. xiv. 13 ff.;
 defeated by Belisarius, I. xiv. 28 ff.;
 punished by Cabades, I. xvii. 26 ff.

Perozes, sons of, murder Symeon, II. iii. 3

Persarmenia, its trade with India, II. xxv. 3;
 devastated by Sittas and Belisarius, I. xii. 20

Persarmenians, in the Persian army, I. xv. 1

Persians, worship the rising sun, I. iii. 20;
 their fire-worship, II. xxiv. 2;
 do not bury the dead, I. xi. 35, xii. 4;
 their set character, II. xxviii. 25;
 their trade in Indian silk, I. xx. 9;
 the arrogance of their officials, I. xi. 33;
 their custom of counting an army before and after a campaign,
    I. xviii. 52 ff.;
 their infantry inefficient, I. xiv. 25;
 their bowmen quick, but inferior to those of the Romans, I. xviii. 32;
 their skill in bridging rivers, II. xxi. 22;
 maintain spies at public expense, I. xxi. 11;
 suffer a severe defeat at the hands of the Ephthalitae, I. iv. 13, 14;
 pay tribute to the Ephthalitae for two years, I. iv. 35;
 make peace with Theodosius, I. ii. 15;
 unable to prevent the fortification of Daras, I. x. 15;
 capture Amida, I. vii. 29;
 receive money from the Romans and give back Amida, I. ix. 4;
 wage war with the Huns during the seven-years' peace with the Romans,
    I. ix. 24;
 seize certain forts in Lazica, I. xii. 19;
 prevent the fortification of Mindouos, I. xiii. 7, 8;
 defeated in battle at Daras, I. xiv. 47 ff.;
 defeated in Persarmenia, I. xv. 8;
 and in Armenia, I. xv. 16;
 refrain from entering Roman territory by Mesopotamia, I. xvii. 25;
 victorious in the battle on the Euphrates, I. xviii. 37;
 invade Mesopotamia, I. xxi. 4;
 besiege Martyropolis in vain, I. xxi. 5 ff.;
 make peace with the Romans, I. xxii. 17, 18;
 capture Sura, II. v. 25;
 and Beroea, II. vii. 12 ff.;
 capture and destroy Antioch, II. viii. 20 ff.;
 capture Petra, II. xvii. 27;
 besiege Edessa in vain, II. xxvi. 5 ff., xxvii. 46;
 save Petra from capture by the Romans, II. xxix. 41 ff.;
 suffer a severe defeat in Lazica, II. xxx. 39 ff.

Pestilence, The, devastates the whole world, II. xxii. 1 ff.;
 in Byzantium, II. xxii. 9 ff.;
 in Persia, II. xxiv. 8, 12

Peter, captured as a boy in Arzanene by Justinus, II. xv. 7;
 Roman general, sent to Lazica, I. xii. 9;
 summoned to Byzantium, I. xii. 14;
 bodyguard of Justinian, commander of infantry, I. xviii. 6;
 at the battle on the Euphrates, I. xviii. 42;
 favours invasion of Persia by Belisarius, II. xvi. 16;
 attacked by the Persians before Nisibis, II. xviii. 16 ff.;
 commands a detachment in an army to invade Persia, II. xxiv. 13;
 precipitately enters Persia, II. xxiv. 18;
 commands the right wing at the battle of Anglon, II. xxv. 17;
 with Martinus and Peranius defends Edessa against Chosroes,
    II. xxvi. 25 ff.;
 Chosroes demands that he and Peranius be surrendered to him, II. xxvi. 38;
 his base character and misrule in Lazica, II. xv. 6-8

Petra, built by Justinian in Lazica, II. xv. 10, xvii. 3, xxix. 20;
 its impregnable defences, II. xvii. 18 ff.;
 attacked by the Persians, II. xvii. 4 ff.;
 besieged by Chosroes, II. xvii. 13 ff.;
 captured by Chosroes, II. xvii. 26;
 fortified with a garrison, II. xix. 48;
 besieged by the Romans and Lazi, II. xxix. 11 ff.;
 the siege abandoned, II. xxx. 11;
 valour of the Persian defenders, II. xxix. 35;
 monopoly established there by John Tzibus, II. xv. 11, xxix. 21

Petrae, ancient capital of the Arabs, I. xix. 20

Phabrizus, high Persian official, II. xxviii. 16;
 employed by Chosroes for the furtherance of his plans, II. xxviii. 17;
 attempts to destroy Goubazes, II. xxix. 2 ff.;
 left as commander in Lazica by Mermeroes, II. xxx. 32;
 his forces almost annihilated by the Lazi, II. xxx. 42 ff.

Pharangium, fortress in Persarmenia, occupied by the Romans, I. xv. 18;
 gold-mines of the Persians there, I. xv. 27, 29;
 given over to the Romans, I. xv. 29, II. iii. 1;
 its return demanded by Chosroes, I. xxii. 3;
 given up by the Romans, I. xxii. 18;
 near the source of the Boas River, II. xxix. 14

Pharas, an Erulian chief, at the battle of
 Daras, I. xiii. 19, 25 ff., xiv. 32, 33, 39

Pharesmanes, of Colchis, an officer
 in the Roman army, I. viii. 3

Pharsanses, a man of note in Lazica, II. xxix. 4;
 his friendship sought by Phabrizus, II. xxix. 5;
 saves Goubazes, II. xxix. 7

Phasis River, its source in the Taurus, I. xxv. 21;
 its course through Lazica, II. xxix. 16;
 its size and strong current, II. xxx. 25, 26;
 strongly defended by the Lazi, II. xxx. 27;
 forded by the Lazi, II. xxx. 37

Philae, fortress established by Diocletian on an island in the Nile
    near Elephantina, I. xix. 34-36;
 its temples dismantled by Justinian, I. xix. 36, 37

Philemouth, an Erulian chief, encamps near Martinus, I. xxiv. 14;
 with Beros follows Peter into Persia, II. xxiv. 18

Phison, place in Armenia near Martyropolis, II. xxiv. 15

Phocas, made pretorian prefect in place of John the Cappadocian,
    I. xxiv. 18

Phoenicia, II. xvi. 17

Phoubelis, a notable among the Lazi, with Dagisthaeus attacks Mermeroes,
    II. xxx. 22

Pitius, a fortress in Lazica, II. xxix. 18

Pityaxes, Persian general at the battle of Daras, I. xiii. 16, xiv. 32, 38

Placillianae, palace In Byzantium, I. xxiv. 30

Pompeius, nephew of Anastasius, sent from the palace by Justinian,
    I. xxiv. 19-21;
 brought before Justinian as a prisoner, I. xxiv. 53;
 his death, I. xxiv. 56

Pontic Romans, their location, II. xxix. 19

Pontus, visited by Orestes, I. xvii. 14

Potidaea, known in later times as Cassandria, captured by the Huns,
    II. iv. 5

Priapus, worshipped by the Blemyes and Nobatae, I. xix. 35

Prison of Oblivion, in Persia, reason for the name, I. v. 8;
 law regarding it suspended once in the case of Arsaces, I. v. 9-29;
 Cabades confined therein, I. v. 7

Probus, nephew of Anastasius, sent by Justinus to Bosporus to
 collect an army of Huns, I. xii. 6, 9

Proclus, quaestor, dissuades Justinus from adopting Chosroes, I. xi. 11 ff.

Procopius of Caesarea, author of the _History of the Wars_, I. i. 1;
 eye-witness of the events described, I. i. 3;
 chosen adviser to Belisarius, I. i. 3, xii. 24;
 in Byzantium at the time of the pestilence, II. xxii. 9;
 had seen Cappadocia and Armenia, I. xvii. 17;
 his frankness in writing, I. i. 5

Pylades, the story of the flight with Orestes from Tauris, I. xvii. 11 ff.

R[edit]



Red Sea, its location, extent, harbours, etc. (confused by Procopius with
    the Arabian Gulf), I. xix. 2 ff., II. iii. 41

Rhecinarius, envoy to Chosroes, II. xxvii. 24, 25

Rhecithancus, of Thrace, commander of troops in Lebanon, objects to
    invading Persia with Belisarius, II. xvi. 17 ff.;
 eager to return to Lebanon, II. xix. 33, 34;
 commands an army sent to Lazica, II. xxx. 29

Rhizaeum, a city near Lazica, II. xxix. 22, xxx. 14

Rhodopolis, important city of Lazica, II. xxix. 18

Romans, used by Procopius to designate the subjects of the empire of
    Byzantium, and mentioned constantly throughout;
 lack of discipline in Roman armies, I. xiv. 14;
 their bowmen more efficient than those of the Persians, I. xviii. 34;
 maintain spies at public expense, I. xxi. 11

Rufinianae, suburb of Byzantium, I. xxv. 21, 23

Rufinus, son of Silvanus, sent as an envoy to the Persians, I. xi. 24;
 slanders Hypatius, I. xi. 38;
 sent as ambassador to Hierapolis, I. xiii. 11;
 treats with Cabades at Daras, I. xvi. 1 ff.;
 reports to the emperor I. xvi. 10;
 meets Chosroes on the Tigris, I. xxii. 1;
 sent, to Byzantium, I. xxii. 7;
 false report of his death, I. xxii. 9;
 persuades Chosroes to give back the money brought by the ambassadors and
   postpone the war, I. xxii. 13, 14;
 slandered to the emperor, I. xxii. 15;
 sent again as ambassador to Chosroes, I. xxii. 16;
 brother of Timostratus, I. xvii. 44;
 father of John, the ambassador, II. vii. 15

S[edit]


Sabeiri Huns, their location, II. xxix. 15;
 in the Persian army, I. xv. 1;
 persuaded by Goubazes to form an alliance with him, II. xxix. 29;
 receive promised money from Justinian, II. xxx. 28

Saccice, mother of Alamoundaras, I. xvii. 1

Samosata, city on the Euphrates, I. xvii. 22;
 on the boundary of Euphratesia, I. xvii. 23

Saracens, experts at plundering, but not at storming cities, II. xix. 12;
 in Persia, all ruled by Alamoundaras, I. xvii. 45;
 some in alliance with the Romans, I. xviii. 46;
 their king Odonathus, II. v. 5;
 of Arabia, ruled by Arethas, I. xvii. 47;
 receiving annual payments from the Romans, II. x. 23;
 settled in the Palm Groves, I. xix. 7, 8;
 and in Palestine, I. xix. 10;
 cannibals in Arabia, I. xix. 15;
 never mentioned in treaties, II. i. 5;
 observe a religious holiday at the vernal equinox, II. xvi. 18;
 dispute possession of Strata, II. i. 6;
 in the army of Chosroes, II. xxvii. 30;
 in the army of Azarethes, I. xvii. 1, xviii. 30;
 with the army of Belisarius, I. xviii. 7, 26, 35, 36, II. xvi. 5;
 wage war among themselves, II. xxviii. 12-14

Sarapanis, a city of Lazica, II. xxix. 18

Sarus River, in Cappadocia, I. xvii. 17

Satala, city in Armenia, its location, I. xv. 9, 10;
 battle of, I. xv. 12 ff.

Scanda, a city in Lazica, II. xxix. 18

Sebastopolis, a fortress of Lazica, II. xxix. 18

Seleucia, city on the Tigris, founded by the Macedonians, II xxviii. 4

Seleucia, distance from Antioch, II. xi. 1;
 visited by Chosroes, _ib._

Senecius, body-guard of Sittas, given as a hostage to the Persians,
    I. xxi. 27

Seoses, rescues Cabades from the Prison of Oblivion, I. vi. 4. 10;
 receives the office of "adrastadaran salanes," I. vi 18, 19;
 sent as envoy to the Romans, I. vi. 25;
 slandered by Mebodes and brought to trial, I. xi. 31 ff.;
 condemned to death, I. xi 37

Sergiopolis, city in Mesopotamia, II. v. 29;
 citizens of, give much treasure to Chosroes, II. xx. 7;
 saved from capture by Ambrus, II. xx. 10;
 besieged In vain by Chosroes, II. xx. 11 ff.

Sergius, an illustrious saint, II. v. 29

Sergius, of Edessa, II. xxiv. 4;
 envoy to Chosroes with Constantianus, II. xxiv. 3;
 a second time envoy to Chosroes with Const., II. xxviii. 3 ff.

Sestus, city opposite Abydus on the Hellespont, II. iv. 9

Silentiarius, a title given to certain officials in the palace at
 Byzantium, "privy councillors," II. xxii. 1, II. xxix. 31

Silvanus, father of Rufinus, I. xi. 24, xvi. 4

Simmas, Massagete chief, in the Roman army, I. xiii. 21, xiv. 44

Siphrios, a fortress, distance from Amida, I. viii. 10

Sisauranon, fortress in Mesopotamia, II. xix. 2;
 attacked by Belisarius, II. xix. 4;
 capitulates to Belisarius, II. xix. 23, 24

Sittas, Roman general, in company with Belisarius invades Persarmenia,
    I. xii. 20, 21;
 defeated by Narses and Aratius, I. xii. 22;
 attacks the Persian army invading Armenia, I. xv. 3 ff.;
 occupies the hills about Satala, I. xv. 10;
 attacks the Persian army unexpectedly, I. xv. 12;
 defeats the Tzani in battle and then wins them over by kindness,
   I. xv. 24, 25;
 proceeds to the East, I. xxi. 3;
 awaits the Persian army at Attachas, I. xxi. 9;
 opens negotiations with the Persians before Martyropolis, I. xxi. 23 ff.;
 sent against the Armenians, II. iii. 8 ff.;
 his death, II. iii. 25;
 his valour and achievements, II. iii. 26

Snail, Gate of the, in the palace in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 43

Soinian Gate, in the wall of Edessa, II. xxvii. 41

Solomon, an Armenian, according to one report slew Sittas, II. iii. 27

Sophanene, district in Armenia, I. xxi. 6

Sophia, sanctuary of, destroyed by fire to the Nika insurrection,
    I. xxiv. 9;
 its treasures guarded by the priest Augustus, II. xxx. 53

Stephanacius, commander of Isaurians, I. xviii. 7

Stephanus, a physician of note, begs Chosroes to spare Edessa,
    II. xxvi. 31 ff.

Strata, its possession disputed by the Saracens, II. i. 6;
 meaning of the name, II. i. 7;
 unproductive, II. i. 11

Strategius, guardian of the royal treasures, sent as an envoy by Justinian,
    II. i. 9;
 his advice concerning Strata, II. i. 11

Summus, father of Julian, commander in Palestine, sent as an envoy by
    Justinian, II. i. 9, 10;
 his advice concerning Strata, II. i. 11

Sunicas, Massagete chief, in the Roman army, I. xiii. 20, xiv. 39. 40, 44;
 charges the standard bearer of Baresmanas, I. xiv. 47;
 kills Baresmanas, I. xiv. 60

Sunitae, march in the Persian army, I. xv. 1

Sura, a city on the Euphrates, I. xviii. 14, II. v. 8;
 distance from Sergiopolis, II. v. 29;
 besieged by Chosroes, II. v. 10 ff.;
 bishop of, begs Chosroes to spare the city, II. v. 13 ff.;
 captured by a stratagem and destroyed, II. v. 22 ff.;
 a woman of, made captive by a barbarian in sight of Chosroes,
    II. ix. 9, 10

Sycae, a suburb of Byzantium, modern "Galata," II. xxiii. 9

Symeon, Sanctuary of, at Amida, burned, I. ix. 18

Symeon, manager of the Persian gold-mine at Pharangium, I. xv. 27;
 goes over to the Romans, I. xv. 28, 29;
 presented with certain Armenian villages, II. iii. 1;
 murdered by the sons of Perozes, II. iii. 2;
 uncle of Amazaspes, II. iii. 3

Syria, open to invasion by the Persians, I. xvii. 34 ff.,
    II. xvi. 17, xix. 34;
 attacked by Chosroes, II. v. 4, vi. 21

Syriac tongue, II. ii. 3

T[edit]



Taraunon, a district In Persarmenia, invaded by Justus and Peranius,
    II. xxv. 35

Tatianus, of Mopsuestia, quarter-master of the camp in Antioch,
   witnesses the portent of the standards, II. x. 2

Taurians, The, in Celesene, I. xvii. 11 ff., 21

Taurus Mountains, The, their size and extent, I. x. 1, 2, xv. 20, xvii. 17

Theoctistus, commander of troops in Lebanon, brings succour to Antioch,
    II. viii. 2;
 flees precipitately with the soldiers, II. viii. 17-19;
 objects to invading Persia with Belisarius, II. xvi. 17 ff.;
 eager to return to Lebanon, II. xix. 33, 34;
 commands a detachment in an army to invade Persia, II. xxiv. 13

Theodoric, leader of the Goths, I. viii. 3

Theodora, wife of Justinian, greatly beloved by him, I. xxv. 4;
 her hatred of John the Cappadocian, _ib._;
 counsels firmness in dealing with the Nika insurrection, I. xxiv. 33 ff.;
 encourages Antonina in her plan to entrap John the Cappadocian,
    I. xxv. 22;
 succeeds in punishing him, I. xxv. 30;
 her death, II. xxx. 49

Theodoras, a citizen of Daras, skilled in mechanics, II. xiii. 26

Theodorus, an official in the palace in Byzantium, superintends the work of
    providing burial for the victims of the pestilence, II. xxiii. 6 ff.

Theodosiopolis, its location, I. x. 18, xv. 2, II. xxiv. 12;
 near the sources of the Euphrates and Tigris, I. xvii. 4;
 fortified by Anastasius, I. x. 19;
 near Bolum, I. xv. 32;
 distance from Doubios, II. xxv. 1;
 from Citharizon, II. xxiv. 13

Theodosiopolis, city near the Aborrhas River, II. xix. 29

Theodosius II., son of Arcadius, as a child is made the ward of the
 Persian king Isdigerdes, I. ii. 1 ff.;
 sends Anatolius as envoy to the Persians, I. ii. 12;
 makes peace with the Persians, I. ii. 15;
 Arsaces' abdication of the kingship of Armenia in his favour, II. iii. 35

Thermopylae, attacked by the Huns, II. iv. 10

Thessaly, plundered by the Huns, II. iv. 10

Thilasamon, village near Amida, I. ix. 14

Thomas, chief priest of Apamea, displays the wood of the cross,
    II. xi. 16 ff.;
 goes before Chosroes, II. xi. 20 ff.;
 saves the wood of the cross, II. xi. 29, 30

Thomas, ambassador to the Persians, meets Chosroes on the Tigris,
    I. xxii. 1

Thomas Gouzes, commander in Lazica, II. xxx. 5

Thrace, Thracians in the army of Belisarius, II. xix. 32, xxi. 4;
 home of Coutzes and Bouzes, I. xiii. 5

Timostratus, brother of Rufinus, Roman officer, captured by Alamoundaras,
    I. xvii. 43, 44

Tigris River, its source in Armenia, I. xvii. 4;
 its course into Assyria, I. xvii. 5, 6;
 distance from Nisibis, I. xi. 27;
 its junction with the Euphrates, I. xvii. 22;
 flows between Seleucia and Ctesiphon, II. xxviii. 5

Trajan, a guardsman, sent with Arethas into Assyria, II. xix. 15 ff.;
 they return by another route, II. xix. 28 ff.

Trapezus, city on the Euxine, II. xxix. 22, xxx. 14

Tretum, a place near Antioch where was a temple of Michael, II. xi. 7

Tribunianus, a Pamphylian, quaestor, I. xxiv. 11;
 his dexterity in manipulating laws, I. xxiv. 16;
 dismissed from office, I. xxiv. 17;
 restored to office, I. xxv. 1, 2;
 his death, I. xxv. 2

Tribunus, a physician, beloved by Chosroes, II. xxviii. 8 ff.

Tripod, before the palace of the Persian king, where all must
     sit who fell under the king's displeasure, I. xxiii. 28

Tripurgia, a place at Edessa, II. xxvii. 41

Tzani, called Sani in early times, I. xv. 21;
 the source of the Boas River among them, II. xxix. 14;
 conquered by the Romans, I. xv. 19 ff.;
 become Christian, I. xv. 25;
 reduced to subjection, II. iii. 39;
 with the Roman army at Petra, II. xxix. 10, 41;
 defend the Roman camp, II. xxx. 13;
 return to their homes, II. xxx. 14

V[edit]


Valerianus, appointed general of Armenia, II. xiv. 8;
 receives Persian envoys, II. xxiv. 6-8;
 reports to Justinian, II. xxiv. 9;
 ordered to invade Persia with Martinus, II. xxiv. 10;
 encamps near Theodosiopolis, II. xxiv. 12;
 follows Peter in invading Persia, II. xxiv. 19;
 commands the left wing at the battle of Anglon, II. xxv. 17

Vandals, II. ii. 8, iii. 46

Vararanes, Persian king, invades Roman territory, I. ii. 11 ff.;
 concludes peace with the Romans, I. ii. 15

Varizes, title of a Persian general (_lit._ "victorious," properly a
     family name), I. xii. 10

Varrames, son of Adergoudounbades, shares the secret of the sparing
     of Chosroes, I. xxiii. 10;
 reveals to Chosroes the true story, I. xxiii. 13;
 made chanaranges, I. xxiii. 22

Veneti, name of one of the factions, I. xxiv. 2-6;
 supported by Justinian, II. xi. 32;
 also called the Blue Faction, _ib._

Venetian Colonnade, The, in Byzantium, I. xxiv. 49

Veredi, the government post horses, II. xx. 20

Vesta, _see_ Hestia

Vitalianus, son of Patriciolus, an officer in the Roman army, I. viii. 3;
 becomes tyrant, _ib._
 his hostility to Anastasius, I. xiii. 10;
 his adviser Hermogenes, _ib._

Vittigis, king of the Goths, sends ambassadors to Chosroes, II. ii. 1;
 they address Chosroes, II. ii. 4 ff.;
 brought to Byzantium by Belisarius, II. iv. 13, xxi. 28;
 remains in Byzantium, II. xiv. 10;
 envoys of, one dies, the other remains in Persia, II. xiv. 11;
 their interpreter captured, II. xiv. 12

W[edit]


White Syrians, old name for the inhabitants of Armenia Minor, I. xvii. 21

Z[edit]


Zaberganes, misrepresents Mebodes to Chosroes, I. xxiii. 25, 26;
 reproaches Chosroes, II. viii. 30 ff.;
 at the bidding of Chosroes receives the envoys of Edessa, II. xxvi. 16-19

Zames, son of Cabades, disqualified from succeeding his father, I. xi. 4;
    II. ix. 12;
 plot to put him in power in place of Chosroes, I. xxiii. 4, 5;
 slain by Chosroes, I. xxiii. 6

Zechi, their location, II. xxix. 15

Zeno, Roman emperor at the time of the Persian king Arsaces, I. iii. 8

Zenobia, city on the Euphrates, II. v. 4;
 founded by Zenobia, II. v. 5;
 Chosroes refrains from attacking it, II. v. 7

Zenobia, wife of Odonathus, founder of the city of Zenobia, II. v. 5

Zeuxippus, Baths of, destroyed by fire in the Nika insurrection, I. xxiv. 9

The Vandalic War[edit]

A[edit]

Abigas River, in Numidia, flowing down from Mt. Aurasium, IV.
    xix. 7, 11, xiii. 20;
  its many channels, IV. xix. 11-13;
  turned upon the Roman camp, IV. x. 14

Abydus, city on the Hellespont, III. i. 8;
  the Roman fleet delayed there, III. xii. 7-xiii. 5

Acacius, ruler of Armenians;
  slain by Artabanes, IV. xxvii. 17

Acacius, priest of Byzantium, delivers over Basiliscus, III. vii. 22

Achilles, Bath of, in Byzantium, III. xiii. 16

Achilles, The, of the Vandals, name applied to Hoamer, III. ix. 2

Aclas, suburb of Carthage, IV. vii. 13

Adaulphus, king of the Visigoths, III. ii. 37

Adriatic Sea, divided from the Tuscan Sea by the islands Gaulus
    and Melite, III. xiv. 16;
  crossed by the Roman fleet, III. xiii. 21;
  the scene of one of Gizeric's atrocities, III. xxii. 18

Aetius, Roman general; his splendid qualities, III. iii. 14, 15;
  rival of Boniface, III. iii. 15;
  whom he slanders to Placidia, III. iii. 17;
  writes a deceitful letter to Boniface, III. iii. 18, 28;
  spared by Placidia by reason of his great power, III. iii. 29;
  defeats Attila, III. iv. 24;
  Maximus plans to destroy him, III. iv. 24, 25;
  slandered to the emperor, III. iv. 26;
  his death, III. iv. 27, vi. 7;
  a great loss to the emperor, III. iv. 28

Aetna, mountain in Sicily, III. xiii. 22

Aïgan, a Massagete, bodyguard of Belisarius, III, xi. 7, 9, IV. x. 4;
  commander of cavalry, III. xi. 7;
  on the right wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 4;
  makes a successful attack upon the Moors in Byzacium, IV. x. 5;
  his force in turn annihilated by the Moors, IV. x. 6 ff.;
  his death, IV. x. 10, xi. 22

Alani, a Gothic people, allies of the Vandals in their migration,
    III. iii. 1;
  with the Vandals in Africa, III. v. 18, 19, xxiv. 3;
  lose their individuality as a people, III. v. 21

Alaric, king of the Visigoths, invades Europe, III, ii, 7;
  captures Rome by a trick, III. ii. 14-23;
  plunders the city, III. ii. 24;
  declares Attalus emperor of the Romans, III. ii. 28;
  marches with Attalus against Ravenna, III. ii. 29;
  opposes sending of commanders to Libya by Attalus, III. ii. 30;
  quarrels with Attalus, and reduces him from the kingship, III. ii. 36;
  dies of disease, III. ii. 37

Alexandria, the home of Calonymus, III. xi. 14

Althias, commander of Roman auxiliaries, III. xi. 6;
  on the left wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 4;
  commander of Huns in Numidia, IV. xiii. 2;
  his encounter with Iaudas, IV. xiii. 3-16;
  his fame from the deed, IV. xiii. 17

Amalasountha, mother of Antalaric;
  makes an agreement with Justinian, III. xiv. 5;
  courts his friendship to secure protection, III. xiv. 6;
  appealed to by the Goths in regard to Lilybaeum, IV. v. 18

Amalafrida, sister of Theoderic;
  sought and given in marriage to Trasamundus, III. viii. 11, 12;
  presented with Lilybaeum, III. viii. 13;
  put under guard by the Vandals, III. ix. 4

Ammatas, brother of Gelimer;
  instructed to prepare to meet the Romans near Carthage,
    III. xvii. 11, xviii. 1;
  kills his kinsmen in prison, III. xvii. 12;
  his inopportune arrival at Decimum, III. xviii. 4, 5;
  on the day before Easter, III. xxi. 23;
  engages with John there and is defeated, III. xviii. 5, 6;
  his death, III. xviii. 6; xix. 30, xx. 6, xxv. 15;
  his body found by the Romans, III. xix. 14

Anastasius, emperor of the East, keeps peace with the Vandals,
    III. vii. 26, viii. 14

Ancon, a dungeon in the royal residence in Carthage, III. xx. 4;
  unexpected release of Roman merchants confined there, III. xx. 5-9

Antaeus, the mythical wrestler, king in Libya, IV. x. 24

Antalas, ruler of the Moors in Byzacium, III. ix. 3, IV. xxv. 2;
  remains faithful to the Romans, IV. xii. 30;
  becomes hostile to Solomon, IV. xxi. 17;
  joins forces with the Leuathae, IV. xxi. 18;
  gathers almost all the Moors under him, IV. xxii. 5;
  writes a letter to Justinian, IV. xxii. 6-10;
  gathers his army again, IV. xxiii. 1;
  Areobindus sends an army against him, IV. xxiv. 6;
  makes an agreement with Gontharis for the destruction of
  Areobindus, IV. xxv. 6-10;
  Coutzinas agrees to turn against him, IV. 25, 15, 18;
  hears of the plot of Coutzinas and keeps his knowledge secret,
    IV. xxv. 19-21;
  resents the sending of the head of Areobindus to him by
  Gontharis, IV. xxvii. 1, 2;
  decides to side with Justinian, IV. xxvii. 4;
  persuades Marcentius to come to him, IV. xxvii. 5, 6;
  Artabanes sent against him, IV. xxvii. 23;
  his quarrel with Coutzinas, IV. xxvii. 24;
  Artabanes marches against him, IV. xxvii. 25;
  his army spared by Artabanes, IV. xxvii. 28, 29;
  defeated by John, IV. xxviii. 46, 47

Anthemius, a wealthy senator, appointed emperor of the West by Leon,
    III. vi. 5;
  killed by his son-in-law, Rhecimer, III. vii. 1

Antonina, wife of Belisarius, mother-in-law of Ildiger, IV. viii. 24;
  sets sail with Belisarius for Africa, III. xii. 2;
  preserves drinking water for Belisarius and his attendants,
    III. xiii. 23, 24;
  with the army at Decimum, III, xix. 11, xx. 1

Apollinaris, a native of Italy;
  comes to Justinian to seek support for Ilderic, IV. v. 7, 8;
  his good services to the Romans, IV. v. 9;
  sent to the islands of Ebusa, Majorica, and Minorica, with an army,
    IV. v. 7

Aquileia, city in Italy, III. iii. 9;
  its size and importance, III. iv. 30;
  besieged and captured by Attila, III. iv. 30 ff.

Arcadius, elder son of Theodosius I;
  receives the eastern empire, III. i. 2;
  brother of Honorius and Placidia, III. iii. 4;
  his alliance with the Visigoths, III. ii. 7;
  succeeded by his son Theodosius II, III. ii. 33

Archelaus, a patrician;
  manager of expenditures of the African expedition, III. xi. 17;
  advises against disembarking on the African coast, III. xv. 2-17;
  ordered by Belisarius not to take the fleet into Carthage,
    III. xvii. 16;
  commands the fleet to anchor off Carthage, III. xx. 11

Ardaburius, son of Aspar, Roman general; sent against the tyrant John,
    III. iii. 8;
  destroyed by Leon, III. vi. 27

Areobindus, a senator; sent as general to Libya, IV. xxiv. 1;
  his inexperience in warfare, IV. xxiv. 1, xxv. 25, xxvi. 16;
  accompanied by his sister and wife, IV. xxiv. 3;
  shares the rule of Libya with Sergius, IV. xxiv. 4, 5;
  sends John against Antalas and Stotzas, IV. xxiv. 6;
  writes to Sergius to unite with John, IV. xxiv. 7;
  made sole commander of Libya, IV. xxiv. 16;
  sends Gontharis against the Moors, IV. xxv. 4, 5;
  arranges with Coutzinas to turn against the other Moors, IV. xxv. 15;
  tells Gontharis of his dealings with Coutzinas, IV. xxv. 16;
  persuaded by G. to postpone the engagement, IV. xxv. 17, 18;
  his death planned and finally accomplished by Gontharis,
    IV. xxv. 22-xxvi. 33;
  treasure left by him in the palace, IV. xxviii. 35;
  sister of, IV. xxiv. 3;
  placed in a fortress for her safety, IV. xxvi. 18;
  removed from the fortress by Gontharis, IV. xxvii. 20

Arethusa, harbour of Syracuse, III. xiv. 11

Ariadne, daughter of Leon, wife of Zenon, and mother of Leon the
    younger, III. vii. 2;
  flees to Isauria with Zenon, III. vii. 18

Arian faith, disqualified one for the office of emperor, III. vi. 3;
  followed by all Goths, III. ii, 5;
  by the Vandals, III. viii. 4, xxi. 20;
  by some among the Roman soldiers, IV. i, 4, xiv. 12, 21;
  adhered to steadfastly by Gelimer, IV. ix. 14;
  Arian priests of the Vandals, III. xxi. 23, 25

Armenia, III. xi. 5;
  Armenians, sent with Areobindus to Libya, IV. xxiv. 2;
  follow Artabanes in entering the service of Gontharis, IV. xxvii. 9;
  support Artabanes in his plot against Gontharis, IV. xxviii. 8, 34, 36

Arsacidae, the ancient royal family of Armenia, IV. xxiv. 2, xxvii. 16

Artabanes, son of John, of the Arsacidae;
  sent to Libya in command of Armenians, IV. xxiv. 2;
  known to Chosroes for his brave deeds, IV. xxvii. 17;
  brother of John, IV. xxiv. 15;
  uncle of Gregorius, IV. xxvii. 10;
  joins Areobindus, IV. xxv. 4;
  supports him against Gontharis, IV. xxvi. 7, 13, 19;
  enters the service of Gontharis, IV. xxvii. 9;
  his plot to kill the tyrant, IV. xxvii. 10;
  urged on by Gregorius, IV. xxvii. 11-19;
  sent against Antalas, IV. xxvii. 23, 25;
  joins battle, but allows the enemy to escape, IV. xxvii. 27-29;
  threatened by Ulitheus, IV. xxvii. 30;
  his excuses, IV. xxvii. 31, 32;
  after deliberation returns to Carthage, IV. xxvii. 33, 35;
  entertained by Gontharis at a banquet, IV. xxviii. 3;
  arranges to carry out his plot against Gontharis, IV. xxviii. 6-9;
  Artasires makes a request of him, IV. xxviii. 12, 13;
  he succeeds in destroying Gontharis with his own hand,
    IV. xxviii. 15-30;
  assisted by Peter, cuts down the body-guards who remain, IV. xxviii. 33;
  directs Athanasius to look after the treasure of Areobindus,
    IV. xxviii. 35;
  sends John and others to Byzantium, IV. xxviii. 40;
  wins great fame, IV, xxviii. 42;
  rewarded with money by Prejecta, IV. xxviii. 43;
  made general of all Libya, IV. xxviii. 43;
  summoned to Byzantium, IV. xxviii. 44.

Artasires, body-guard of Artabanes;
  shares knowledge of his plot against Gontharis, IV. xxvii. 10, 18;
  renders good service in the execution of the plot, IV. xxviii. 7-32;
  his ingenious protection for his arm, IV. xxviii. 10, 11, 31

Asclepiades, a native of Palestine and friend of Theodorus, IV. xviii. 3;
  reveals the plot of Maximinus to Theodorus and Germanus, IV. xviii. 4

Asia, the continent to the right of the Mediterranean as one sails into it,
    III. i. 5;
  distance from Europe at different points, III. i. 7, 8;
  distance along the Asiatic side of the Euxine, III. i. 11

Asiaticus, father of Severianus, IV. xxiii. 6

Aspar, Roman general; father of Ardaburius, III. iii. 8;
  of the Arian faith, III. vi. 3;
  his great power in Byzantium, III. iv. 8;
  sent against the tyrant John, III. iii. 8;
  defeated by the Vandals in Libya, III. iii. 35;
  returns home, III. iii. 36;
  makes Leon emperor of the East, III. v. 7;
  his friendship sought by Basiliscus, III. vi. 2;
  quarrels with Leon, III. vi. 3;
  urges Basiliscus to spare the Vandals, III. vi. 4, 16;
  destroyed by Leon, III. vi. 27;
  the emperor Marcian had been his adviser, III. iv. 7

Atalaric, son of Amalasuntha;
  ruler of the Goths, III. xiv. 5;
  succeeded his grandfather Theoderic, III. xiv. 6

Athanasius, sent with Areobindus to Libya, IV. xxiv. 2;
  summoned by Areobindus, IV. xxvi. 6;
  being summoned by Gontharis, pretends to be pleased, IV. xxvi. 21, 22;
  with Areobindus entertained by Gontharis, IV. xxvi. 31;
  spared by the assassins of Gontharis, IV. xxvi. 33;
  entertained by Gontharis at a second banquet, IV. xxviii. 3;
  directed by Artabanes to look after the treasure of
  Areobindus, IV. xxviii. 35

Athens, its distance from Megara a measure of one day's journey, III. i. 17

Attalus, made king of the Visigoths and declared emperor of the
    Romans by Alaric, III. ii. 28;
  of noble family, _ibid._; his lack of discretion, III. ii. 29;
  marches with Alaric against Ravenna, _ibid._;
  sends commanders alone to Libya against the advice of
    Alaric, III. ii. 30, 32;
  failure of his attempt upon Libya, _ibid._;
  quarrels with Alaric, and is reduced from the kingship, III. ii. 36

Attila, leader of the Huns, defeated by Aetius, III. iv. 24;
  overruns Europe, III. iv. 29;
  besieges and captures Aquileia; III. iv. 30 ff.

Augustus, emperor of the West, III. vii. 15

Aurasium, a mountain in Numidia;
  distance from Carthage, III. viii. 5, IV. xiii. 22;
  its great size, fruitful plateaus, and defences, IV. xiii. 23-25;
  source of the Abigas River there, IV. xiii. 20, xix. 11;
  adjoins First Mauretania, IV. xx. 30;
  taken by the Moors from the Vandals, III. viii. 5, IV. xiii. 26;
  its west side also held by the Moors, IV. xiii. 27;
  Moors of, ruled by Iaudas, IV. xii. 29, xiii. 1;
  Solomon marches thither, IV. xiii. 18;
  Iaudas establishes himself there, IV. xiii. 21;
  ascended by Solomon, IV. xiii. 30 ff.;
  the Romans eluded by the Moors on the mountain, IV. xiii. 35, 36;
  Solomon prepares more carefully for a second attempt, IV. xiii. 40;
  in which he succeeds completely in dislodging the Moors from there,
    IV. xix. 5-xx. 20;
  fortified and held by the Romans, IV. xx. 22;
  capture of Iaudas' treasure there, IV. xx. 23-29;
  fugitive Vandals return thither, IV. xiv. 19

B[edit]


Babosis, place in Numidia, IV. xix. 16

Bacchus, brother of Solomon, and father of Cyrus and Sergius,
    IV. xxi. 1, 19;
  father of Solomon the younger, IV. xxi. 19, xxii. 17

Bagaïs, a deserted city near the Abigas River, IV. xix. 7

Bagradas River, in Libya, IV. xv. 13

Balas, leader of the Massagetae, III. xi. 12

Bandifer, "standard-bearer" (Latin), cf. Bandum, IV. x. 4

Bandum, the Latin term for "standard" in Procopius' time, IV. ii. 1

Barbaricini, name applied to the Moors in Sardinia, IV. xiii. 44

Barbatus, commander of Roman cavalry, III. xi. 7, IV. xv. 50;
  on the Roman right wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 4;
  his death, IV. xv. 59

Basiliscus, brother of Berine; commander of an expedition against the
    Vandals, III. vi. 2;
  his aspirations to the throne, _ibid._;
  urged by Aspar to spare the Vandals, III. vi. 4;
  landing in Africa, makes a complete failure of the
  expedition, III. vi. 10-24, x. 2;
  returning to Byzantium, becomes a suppliant, III. vi. 26;
  saved by Berine, _ibid._;
  makes himself tyrant in Byzantium, III. vii. 18;
  his misrule, III. vii. 19;
  sends an army under Harmatus to meet Zenon, III. vii. 20;
  becomes a suppliant, III. vii. 22;
  exiled to Cappadocia and dies, III. vii. 24, 25

Basiliscus, son of Harmatus, III. vii. 21;
  made Caesar and then removed by Zenon, III. vii. 23

Belisarius, Roman general; a native of "Germany," III. xi. 21;
  summoned from the East, III. ix. 25;
  ordered to be in readiness to lead the African expedition, III. x. 21;
  made commander-in-chief of the African expedition with unlimited power,
    III. xi. 18, 20;
  sets sail for Africa, III. xii. 2;
  punished two Massagetae for murder, III. xii. 9;
  addresses the army at Abydus, III. xii. 10-21;
  provides for the safe navigation of the fleet, III. xiii. 1-4;
  disembarks the army at Methone, III. xiii. 9 ff.;
  provides a supply of bread for the army, III. xiii. 20;
  his wife preserves the drinking water, III. xiii. 23, 24;
  sends Procopius to Syracuse to get information, III. xiv. 3 ff.;
  his anxiety regarding the Vandals and the attitude of his own soldiers,
    III. xiv. 1, 2;
  starts from Sicily toward Africa, III. xiv. 15;
  holds a consultation regarding disembarking on the African coast,
    III. xv. 1 ff.;
  disembarks the army and fortifies a camp, III. xv. 31-33;
  orders the fleet not to put in at Carthage, III. xvii. 10;
  commands five men to remain on each ship, III. xv. 36;
  punishes some of the soldiers for stealing and addresses the army,
    III. xvi. 1-8;
  advances with the army to Decimum, where he defeats the Vandals in
    an engagement, III. xvi. 9-xix. 33, xxi. 16. xxii. 14;
  captures with ease the unwalled cities of Libya, III. v. 9;
  prevents the army from entering Carthage on the evening of their arrival,
    III. xx. 2;
  his commands respected by the greater part of the fleet, III. xx. 15;
  enters Carthage with his army, III. xx. 17;
  exhorts the soldiers to moderation, III. xx. 18-20;
  sits upon the throne of Gelimer, III. xx. 21;
  hears and answers complaints of Carthaginian citizens, III. xx. 22, 23;
  lunches in Gelimer's palace, III. xxi. 1, 5;
  enjoys great renown by reason of the peaceful entry into Carthage,
    III. xxi. 8;
  his treaties with the Moors, III. xxv. 2-9, IV. viii. 11 ff., xi. 9;
  considers the repair of the fortifications of Carthage, III. xxi. 11;
  presses on the work of repairing them, III. xxiii. 19, 20;
  spares the messengers of Tzazon, III. xxiv. 6;
  and the envoys of Gelimer, III. xxiv. 17;
  takes measures to prevent desertions to the Vandals, IV, i. 7-11;
  addresses the army, IV. i. 12-25;
  defeats the Moors in the battle of Tricamarum, IV. ii. 1-iii. 18;
  attacks the Vandal camp, IV. iii. 19;
  takes measures to stop the disorder in the Roman army, IV. iv. 6-8;
  sends John the Armenian to pursue Gelimer, IV. iv. 9;
  himself follows Gelimer, IV. iv. 13;
  mourns the death of John the Armenian, IV. iv. 24;
  spares Uliaris, IV. iv, 25;
  continues the pursuit of Gelimer, IV. iv. 26;
  leaves Pharas to besiege Gelimer, IV. iv. 28;
  sends suppliant Vandals to Carthage, IV. iv. 32;
  captures Boniface with the treasures of Gelimer, IV. iv. 33-41;
  returns to Carthage, IV. v. 1;
  sends out armies to recover many lost provinces, V. v. 1-10;
  makes an unsuccessful expedition to Sicily, IV. v. 11;
  writes a letter to the Goths, IV. v. 12-17;
  their reply, IV. v. 8-24;
  reports to Justinian, IV. v. 25;
  receives the report of Pharas regarding Gelimer, IV. vii. 10;
  sends Cyprian with instructions, IV. vii. 11;
  receives Gelimer at Aclas, IV. vii. 13, 14;
  reports the capture of Gelimer, IV. vii. 17;
  the victim of unjust slander, IV. viii. 1, 2;
  given choice of going to Byzantium or remaining in Carthage, IV. viii. 4;
  chooses the former IV. viii. 5;
  learns of the accusation of treason to be brought against
  him, IV. viii. 6, 7;
  hears the report of the uprising of the Moors, IV. viii. 22;
  leaves Solomon in charge of Libya, IV. viii. 23;
  returning to Byzantium, receives great honours, IV, ix. 1 ff.;
  brings Vandals with him, IV. ix. 1, xiv. 17;
  pays homage to Justinian in the hippodrome, IV. ix. 12;
  later celebrates a "triumph" in the old manner, IV. ix. 15;
  becomes a consul, _ibid._;
  distributes much wealth of the Vandals to the people, IV. ix. 16;
  subjugates Sicily, IV. xiv. 1;
  passes the winter in Syracuse, IV. xiv. 4, 41;
  Solomon begs him to come to Carthage from Syracuse to put down the
    mutiny, IV. xiv. 41, 42;
  arrives at Carthage in time to prevent its surrender, IV. xv. 9-10;
  pursues and overtakes the fugitives, IV. xv. 11, 12;
  encamps at the Bagradas River and prepares for battle, IV. xv. 13-15;
  addresses the army, IV. xv. 16-29;
  defeats Stotzas' army, IV. xv. 40 ff.;
  forbids pursuit of the enemy, but allows their camp to be plundered,
    IV. xv. 46, 47;
  returns to Carthage, IV. xv. 47; upon receipt of unfavourable news,
    sets sail for Sicily, IV. xv. 48, 49;
  Solomon sends suspected soldiers to him, IV. xix. 3;
  counted the chief cause of the defeat of the Vandals, IV. xi. 44.

Berine, wife of the Emperor Leon, and sister of Basiliscus, III. vi. 2;
  gains clemency for Basiliscus, III. vi. 26

Boniface, Roman general; his splendid qualities, III. iii. 14, 15;
  rival of Aetius, III. iii. 15;
  made general of all Libya, III. iii. 16;
  slandered by Aetius, III. iii. 17;
  summoned to Rome by Placidia, III. iii. 18;
  refuses to come, III. iii. 20;
  makes an alliance with the Vandals, III. iii. 22, 25;
  the true cause of his conduct discovered by his friends,
    III. iii. 27, 28;
  urged by Placidia to return to Rome, III. iii. 29;
  unable to persuade the Vandals to withdraw, meets them in battle
    and is twice defeated, III. iii. 30-35, xxi. 16;
  returns to Rome, III. iii. 36

Boniface, the Libyan, a native of Byzacium; entrusted by
  Gelimer with his wealth, IV. iv. 33, 34;
  falls into the hands of Belisarius, IV. iv. 35-41

Boriades, body-guard of Belisarius;
  sent to capture Syllectus, III. xvi. 9

Boulla, Plain of, distance from Carthage, III. xxv. 1;
  near the boundary of Numidia, _ibid._;
  the Vandals gather there, III. xix. 32, xxv. 1;
  the only territory left to the Vandals, III. xxv. 16;
  Gelimer and Tzazon meet there, III. xxv. 22;
  mutineers gather there, IV. xv. 1

Bourgaon, mountain in Byzacium;
  battle there with the Moors, IV. xii. 3 ff.

Britain, counted in the Western empire, III. i. 18;
  revolts from the Romans, III. ii. 31;
  not recovered by the Romans, but held by tyrants, III. ii. 38

Byzacium, a Moorish province in Libya, III. xix. 32;
  a dry region, III. xv. 34;
  the town Hermione there, III. xiv. 10;
  Moors of, defeat the Vandals, III. ix. 3;
  Moors, of, seek alliance with the Romans, III. xxv. 3;
  the home of Boniface, the Libyan, IV. iv. 33;
  Moors of, revolt, IV. viii. 9, x. 2, xii. 1, 2;
  Roman force annihilated there, IV. x. 3 ff.;
  Solomon marches thither to confront the Moors, IV. xi. 14;
  Moors of, suffer a crushing defeat, IV. xii. 21-25;
  abandoned by the Moors, IV. xii. 29;
  except those under Antalas, IV. xii. 30;
  plundered by the Leuathae, IV. xxi. 17;
  Moors gather there once more, IV. xxiii. 1;
  Himerius of Thrace commander there, IV. xxiii. 3, 14;
  Moors march, thence against Carthage, IV. xxv. 2;
  defeated by John, IV. xxviii. 46;
  subsequent battles, IV. xxviii. 47 ff.

Byzantium, distance from the mouth of the Danube, III. i. 10;
  from Carthage, III. x. 14;
  its chief priest Epiphanius, III. xii. 2;
  natives of, as rowers in the Roman fleet, III. xi. 16

C[edit]


Cabaon, a Moorish ruler, prepares to meet the Vandals, III. viii. 15-16;
  sends spies to Carthage, III. viii. 17 ff.;
  receives the report of his spies, III. viii. 24;
  prepares for the conflict, III. viii. 25, 26, IV. xi. 17;
  defeats the enemy, III. viii. 28

Caenopolis, name of Taenarum in Procopius' time, III. xiii. 8

Caesar, a title given to one next below the emperor in
  station, III. vii. 21, 23

Caesarea, first city of "Second Mauretania," IV. xx. 31;
  situated at its eastern extremity, IV. x. 29;
  distance from Carthage, IV. v. 5;
  recovered for the Romans by Belisarius, _ibid._, IV. xx. 32

Calonymus, of Alexandria, admiral of the Roman fleet, III. xi. 14;
  ordered by Belisarius not to take the fleet into Carthage,
    III. xvii. 16;
  enters the harbour Mandracium with a few ships, and plunders
    the houses along the sea, III. xx. 16;
  bound by oath to return his plunder, III. xx. 23;
  disregards his oath, but later dies of apoplexy in Byzantium,
    III. xx. 24, 25

Capitolinus, see Jupiter.

Cappadocia, Basiliscus exiled thither, III. vii. 24

Caputvada, a place on the African coast; distance from Carthage,
    III. xiv. 17;
  the Roman army lands there, _ibid._

Caranalis, town in Sardinia, captured by Tzazon,
    III. xxiv. 1, xxv. 10, IV. xiii. 44

Carthage, city in Africa, founded by Dido, IV. x. 25;
  grows to be the metropolis of Libya, IV. x. 26, 27;
  captured by the Romans, IV. x. 28;
  after the Vandal occupation, its wall preserved by Gizeric, III. v. 6;
  the only city with walls in Libya, III. xv. 9;
  its defences neglected by the Vandals, III. xxi. 11, 12;
  entered by the Roman army under Belisarius, III. xx. 17, 21;
  its fortifications restored by Belisarius, III. xxiii. 19, 20;
  besieged by Gelimer, IV. i. 3;
  by Stotzas, IV. xv. 8;
  its surrender prevented by Belisarius, IV. xv. 9, 10;
  the harbours, Stagnum, III. xv. 15, xx. 15,
  and Mandracium, III. xx. 3, 14, IV. xxvi. 10;
  the ship-yard Misuas, IV. xiv. 40;
  its suburb Aclas, IV. vii. 13;
  and Decimum, III. xvii. 11;
  its aqueduct, IV. i. 2;
  its hippodrome, IV. xiv. 31, xviii. 11;
  its palace, III. xx, 21, IV. xiv. 34, xviii. 8, xxvi. 20;
  the priest of the city, Reparatus, IV. xxvi. 24, 31;
  monastery built and fortified there by Solomon, IV. xxvi. 17;
  an ancient saying among the children there, III. xxi. 14-16;
  church of St. Cyprian, and a special annual festival in his honour,
    III. xxi. 17, 18;
  distance from Aurasium, III, viii. 5, IV. xiii. 22;
  from the Plain of Boulla, III. xxv. 1;
  from Byzantium, III. x. 14;
  from Caesarea, IV. v. 5;
  from Caputvada, III. xiv. 17;
  from Decimum, III. xvii. 17;
  from Grasse, III. xvii. 8;
  from Hippo Regius, IV. iv. 26;
  from Iouce, III, xv. 8;
  from Membresa, IV. xv. 12;
  from Mercurium, III. vi. 10;
  from Siccaveneria, IV. xxiv. 6;
  from Stagnum, III. xv. 15, xx. 15;
  from Tebesta, IV. xxi. 19;
  from Tricamarum, IV. ii. 4

Casula (Latin), garment befitting one of humble station, IV. xxvi. 26

Caucana, place in Sicily, III. xiv. 4, 11, 14;
  distance from Syracuse, III. xiv. 4

Centenarium, a sum of money, so called because it "weighs one
  hundred pounds" (I. xxii. 4), III. vi. 2

Centuriae, place in Numidia, IV. xiii. 2

Chalcedon, city opposite Byzantium, III. i. 8, 9;
  distance from the Phasis River, III. i. 11

Chiliarch, III. v. 18, IV. iii. 8

Chosroes, Persian king; Artabanes known to him, IV. xxvii. 17

Christ, His temple in Byzantium, III. vi. 26

Christians, persecuted by Honoric, III. viii. 3, 4, xxi. 19;
  by Gundamundus, III. viii. 7;
  courted by Trasamundus, III. viii. 9, 10;
  not troubled by Ilderic, III. ix. 1;
  Justinian reproached for not protecting them, III. x. 19;
  the church of St. Cyprian taken from them by the Vandals, III. xxi. 19;
  consoled in a dream sent by St. Cyprian, III. xxi. 21;
  recover the church of St. Cyprian, III. xxi. 25;
  in Jerusalem, receive the treasures of the temple, IV. ix. 9;
  reverence their churches and their worship, III. viii. 17, 18, 20, 24;
  their rite of baptism, III. xii. 2, IV. xxvi. 25, 28;
  their feast of Easter, IV. xiv. 7;
  if not of the orthodox faith, excluded from the church, IV. xiv. 14;
  Christian scriptures, IV. xxi. 21, xxvi. 28;
  Christian teaching, offended against by Basiliscus, III. vii. 22

Cilicians, as sailors in the African expedition, III. xi. 14

Clipea, city in Africa, IV. x. 24

Clypea, see Shield Mountain

Colchis, at the end of the Black Sea, III. i. 11

Constantina, city in Africa; distance from Gazophyla, IV. xv. 52

Constantine the Great; division of the Roman empire dating
  from his time, III. i. 3;
  his enlargement of Byzantium and giving of his name to the city, _ibid._

Constantinus, chosen king by the soldiers in Britain, III. ii. 31;
  his invasion of Spain and Gaul, _ibid._; defeated and killed
  in battle, III. ii. 37

Constantius, husband of Placidia, partner in the royal power with Honorius;
  his brief reign and death, III. iii. 4;
  father of Valentinian, III. iii. 5

Corsica, called Cyrnus in ancient times, IV. v. 3;
  Cyril sent thither with an army, _ibid._;
  recovered for the Roman empire, IV. v. 4

Coutzinas, a Moorish ruler, joins in an attack upon a Roman force,
    IV. x. 6;
  agrees to turn against the other Moors, IV. xxv. 2, 15;
  his further dealings with Areobindus, IV. xxv. 17, 18;
  ignorant of Antalas' knowledge of his plot, IV. xxv. 20, 21;
  separates from Antalas, and sides with Gontharis, IV. xxvii. 24;
  marches with Artabanes against Antalas, IV. xxvii. 25, 27;
  in alliance with John, IV. xxviii. 50

Cteanus, name applied to Theodorus, III. xi. 7

Cyanean Rocks, or "Dark Blue Rocks" at the mouth of the Bosphorus,
    III. i. 8

Cyprian, commander of Roman auxiliaries, III. xi. 6;
  on the left wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 4;
  sent by Belisarius to bring Gelimer from Papua, IV. vii. 11

Cyprian, a saint, especially reverenced at Carthage, III. xxi. 17;
  a church to him there and a festival celebrated in his honour,
    III. xxi. 18, 23, 25;
  sends a dream to devout Christians, III. xxi. 21

Cypriana, a periodic storm on the African coast, III. xx. 12

Cypriana, a festival celebrated at Carthage, in honour of Cyprian,
    from which the storm was named, III. xxi. 18

Cyrene, city in Africa, marking the division between the eastern
    and western empires, III. i. 16

Cyril, sent as commander of an army to Sardinia, III. xi. 1, 6;
  avoids Sardinia and sails to Carthage, III. xxiv. 19;
  sent to Sardinia and Corsica with an army, IV. v. 2, 3;
  wins them back for the empire, IV. v. 4;
  commander of auxiliaries in Numidia, IV. xv. 50;
  his death, IV. xv. 59

Cyrnus, ancient name of Corsica, IV. v. 3

Cyrus, son of Bacchus and brother of Sergius;
  becomes ruler of Pentapolis in Libya, IV. xxi. 1, 16;
  brother of Solomon the younger, IV. xxi. 19;
  marches with Solomon against the Moors, ibid.

D[edit]


Dalmatia, held by Marcellianus as tyrant, III. vi. 7

Danube River, called also the Ister, III. i. 10

Daras, city on the eastern frontier of the empire;
  home of Solomon, III. xi. 9

December, IV. in. 28

Decimum, suburb of Carthage, III. xvii. 11, 17, xviii. 5,
  xix. 1, 14, 23, 33, xx. 6, 7, 10, xxi. 23, 24, IV. xxv. 12;
  the Vandals routed there, III. xviii. 7-11, xix. 31;
  distance from Carthage, III. xvii. 17;
  from Pedion Halon, III. xviii. 12

Delphi, tripods first made there, III. xxi. 3

Delphix, a word used by the Romans to designate a royal banquet room,
    III. xxi. 2, 3;
  in the palace of Gelimer, III. xxi. 5

Dido, her emigration from Phoenicia, IV. x. 25

Diogenes, guardsman of Belisarius;
  his notable exploit on a scouting expedition, III. xxiii. 5-18

Dolones, the large sails on ships, III. xvii. 5

Domesticus, a title designating a kind of confidential adviser,
    III. iv. 7, xi. 5

Domnicus, senator, accompanies Germanus to Libya, IV. xvi. 2;
  at the battle of Scalae Veteres, IV. xvii. 4;
  summoned to Byzantium, IV. xix. 1

Dorotheus, general of Armenia;
  commander of auxiliaries, III. xi. 5;
  his death; III. xiv. 14

Dromon, a swift ship of war, III. xi. 15, 16, xv. 36

Dryous, city on the east
  coast of Italy, III. i. 9, 12

Dyrrachium, the name of Epidamnus in Procopius' time, III. i. 16, xi. 8

E[edit]


Easter, a feast of the Christians, IV. xiv. 7;
  Arians annoyed by exclusion from it, IV. xiv, 15

Ebusa, island in the western Mediterranean,
  so-called by the natives, III. i. 18;
  Apollinarius sent thither with an army, IV. v. 7

Egypt, formerly marked the limit of Phoenicia, IV. x. 15;
  densely populated from ancient times, IV. x. 19;
  the migration of the Hebrews from there, IV. x. 13;
  the Phoenicians pass through it on their way to Libya, IV. x. 18

Egyptians, as sailors in the African expedition, III. xi. 14

Emesa, city in Syria;
  home of Severianus, IV. xxiii. 6

Epidamnus (Dyrrachium), city on the Ionian Sea, III. i. 16;
  home of John, III. xi. 8

Epiphanius, chief priest of Byzantium;
  blesses the fleet, III. xii. 2

Eruli, Roman auxiliaries in the African expedition, III. xi. 11;
  their untrustworthy character, IV. iv. 30;
  of the Arian faith, IV. xiv. 12;
  dissuade Stotzas from attacking Germanus, IV. xvii. 14, 15

Esdilasas, a Moorish ruler;
  joins in an attack upon a Roman force, IV. x. 6 ff.;
  surrenders himself to the Romans, IV. xii. 26;
  brought to Carthage, IV. xii. 29

Euagees, brother of Hoamer;
  imprisoned by Gelimer, III. ix. 9. 14;
  killed in prison by Ammatas, III. xvii. 12

Eudocia, daughter of Eudoxia;
  taken captive by Gizeric, III. v. 3;
  married to Honoric, III. v. 6

Eudoxia, daughter of Theodosius and wife of Valentinian, III. iv. 15, 20;
  mother of Eudocia and Placidia, III. v. 3;
  forced to be the mistress of Maximus, III. iv. 86;
  invites Gizeric to avenge her, III. iv. 37-39;
  taken captive by Gizeric, III. v. 3;
  sent to Byzantium, III. v. 6

Eulogius, Roman envoy to Godas, III. x. 32, 33;
  returns with his reply, III. x. 34

Europe, the continent opposite Asia, III. i. 7, xxii. 15;
  distance from Asia at different points, III. i. 7, 8;
  distance along the European side of the Euxine, III. i. 10;
  extent of the western empire in, III. i. 14;
  invaded by Alaric, III. ii. 7;
  all its wealth plundered by the Visigoths, III. ii. 13;
  overrun by Attila, III. iv. 29

Eustratius, sent to Libya to assess the taxes, IV. viii. 25

Eutyches, heresy of, III. vii. 22

Euxine Sea, distance around it, III. i. 10, 11;
  receives the waters of the Phasis, III. i. 11

Excubitori, a Latin name for "guard," IV. xii. 17

F[edit]


Foederati, auxiliary troops, III. xi. 2, 3, 5, xix. 13, 14,
      IV. iii. 4, vii. 11, xv. 50

Foedus (Latin) "treaty," III. xi. 4

Franks, name used for all the Germans in Procopius' time, III. iii. 1

Fuscias, sent as envoy to Spain by Gelimer, III. xxiv. 7 ff.

G[edit]


Gadira, the strait of Gibraltar at the western extremity of the
    Mediterranean, III. i. 4, 5, xxiv. 8, IV. v. 5, 6;
  width of the strait, III. i. 7;
  distance from Tripolis, III. i. 14;
  and from the Ionian Sea, III. i. 15;
  marking the limit of Mauretania, IV. x. 29;
  the Vandals cross there, III. iii. 26;
  _see_ Heracles, Pillars of

Galatia, lands there given to Gelimer, IV. ix. 13

Gaulus, island between
  the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian Seas, III. xiv. 16

Gaul, the Visigoths retire thither, III. ii. 13, 37;
  invaded by Constantius, III. ii. 31

Gazophyla, place in Numidia, IV. xv. 62;
  distance from Constantina, _ibid._;
  Roman commanders take sanctuary there, IV. xv. 59

Geilaris, son of Genzon and father of Gelimer, III. ix. 6

Gelimer, king of the Vandals;
  son of Geilaris, III. ix. 6;
  brother of Tzazon, III. xi. 23, xxiv. 1;
  and of Ammatas, III. xvii. 11;
  uncle of Gibamundus, III. xviii. 1;
  his character, III. ix. 7;
  encroaches upon the authority of Ilderic, III. ix. 8;
  secures the royal power, _ibid._;
  allowed by the Goths to hold Lilybaeum, IV. v. 13;
  imprisons Ilderic, Hoamer, and Euagees, III. ix. 9;
  defies Justinian, and shews further cruelty to the imprisoned princes,
    III. ix. 14;
  replies to Justinian, III. ix. 20-23;
  Justinian prepares an expedition against him, III. x. 1 ff.;
  sends envoys to Spain, III. xxiv. 7;
  his slave Godas becomes tyrant of Sardinia, III. x. 25-27;
  sends an expedition to Sardinia, III. xi. 22, 23;
  his ignorance of the approaching Roman expedition, III. xiv. 10;
  entrusts his wealth to Boniface, IV. iv. 34;
  confines Roman merchants in a dungeon in the palace, III. xx. 5, 6;
  expected by Belisarius to make an attack, III. xvii. 4;
  writes to his brother in Carthage, III. xvii. 11;
  follows the Roman army, III. xvii. 14;
  plans his attack upon the Roman army, III. xviii. 1;
  comes upon the Romans with a large force of cavalry, III. xix. 18;
  anticipates them in seizing a point of advantage, III. xix. 20-22;
  by a great blunder loses the chance of defeating the Roman armies,
    III. xix. 25-29;
  attacked and routed by Belisarius, III. xix. 30, 31, xxi. 16;
  flees to the Plain of Boulla, III. xix. 32;
  Belisarius sits upon his throne, III. xx. 21;
  his banquet-hall, servants, and even food, used by the Romans,
    III. xxi. 1-6;
  reason for his not staying in Carthage, III. xxi. 12;
  encourages Libyan farmers to kill Roman soldiers, III. xxiii. 1-4;
  eluded by a party of Roman scouts, III. xxiii. 6-16;
  Tzazon writes to him from Sardinia, III. xxiv. 2-4;
  collects the Vandals in the Plain of Boulla, III. xxv. 1;
  sends a letter to Tzazon in Sardinia, III. xxv. 10-18;
  leads the Vandals against Carthage, IV. i. 1;
  cuts the aqueduct and tries to besiege the city, IV. i. 2, 3;
  prepares the Vandals for battle at Tricamarum, and addresses the army,
    IV. ii. 8-22;
  at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 9;
  flees from the Vandals' camp, IV. iii. 20;
  pursued by John the Armenian, IV. iv. 9, 14;
  and by Belisarius, IV. iv. 13, 26;
  escapes his pursuers, and takes refuge on Mt. Papua, IV. iv. 26, 28;
  Moors there friendly to him, IV. iv. 27;
  Pharas set to guard him, IV. iv. 28, 31;
  suffers great misery on Mt. Papua, IV. vi. 4, 14;
  receives a letter from Pharas, IV. vi. 15-26;
  replies with a letter, IV. vi. 27-30;
  the meaning of his strange request, IV. vi. 31-33;
  after enduring extreme suffering, is induced by a piteous
  sight to surrender, IV. vii. 1-6;
  writes a second time to Pharas, IV. vii. 6-9;
  Cyprian comes to Papua to take him prisoner, IV. vii. 11;
  surrenders himself, IV. vii. 12;
  meets Belisarius at Aclas, IV. vii. 14;
  his unexpected laughter, IV. vii. 14-16;
  marvels at the restoration of the fortifications of Carthage by
    Belisarius, III. xxiii. 20, 21;
  his capture reported by Belisarius, IV. vii. 17;
  reaches Byzantium with Belisarius, IV, ix. 1;
  a slave in Belisarius' triumph, IV. ix. 10;
  before Justinian in the hippodrome, IV. ix. 11, 12;
  given lands in Galatia, but not made a patrician, IV. ix. 13, 14;
  nephew of, IV. vii. 4

Geminianus, Rock of, on Mt Aurasium, IV. xx. 23

Genzon, son of Gizeric;
  receives Libyan slaves, III. v. 11;
  tries to save John, III. vi. 24;
  father of Gundamundus and Trasamundus, III. viii. 6, 8;
  and of Geilaris, III. ix. 6;
  his death, III. viii. 1

Gergesites, ancient people of Phoenicia, IV. x. 17;
  emigrate to Egypt and then to Libya, IV. x. 18, 19

Gepaides, one division of the Gothic peoples, III. ii. 2;
  their location, III. ii. 6

Getic, a name sometime applied to the Gothic peoples, III. ii. 2

Gezon, a Roman infantryman, paymaster of his company, IV. xx. 12;
  scales the fortress of Toumar and leads the army to its
  capture, IV. xx. 13-16

Germania, the home of Belisarius, III. xi. 21

Germans, called Franks in Procopius' time, III. iii. 1;
  according to one account killed Gontharis, III. iii. 33

Germanus, Roman general, nephew of Justinian;
  sent to Libya, IV. xvi. 1;
  makes a count of the loyal part of the army, IV. xvi. 3;
  wins over many mutineers by persuasion, IV. xvi. 4-6;
  prepares to meet Stotzas in battle, IV. xvi. 7;
  arrays his army for battle, IV. xvi. 10;
  addresses his troops, IV. xvi. 11-24;
  follows the mutineers into Numidia, IV. xvii. 2;
  overtaking the enemy at Scalae Veteres, prepares for battle,
    IV. xvii. 3-6;
  receives offers of desertion from the Moors with Stotzas, IV. xvii. 9;
  not able to trust them, IV. xvii. 10;
  Stotzas proposes to attack his division, IV. xvii. 13;
  rallies the Romans, IV. xvii. 18;
  routs the mutineers, IV. xvii. 19, 20;
  his horse killed under him, IV. xvii. 23;
  orders his men to distinguish their comrades by the countersign,
    IV. xvii. 22;
  captures and plunders the enemy's camp, IV. xvii. 24-29;
  tries to restore order in the army, IV. xvii. 30;
  defeats Stotzas in a second battle, IV. xvii. 34;
  learns the plot of Maximinus from Asclepiades; IV. xviii. 4;
  invites Max. to join his body-guards, IV. xviii. 5, 6;
  frustrates the attempt of Maximinus, IV. xviii. 8-15;
  examines Max. and impales him, IV. xviii. 17, 18;
  summoned to Byzantium, IV. xix. 1;
  false report of his coming to Carthage, IV. xxiii. 23, 25

Gibamundus, nephew of Gelimer, III. xviii. 1;
  sent to attack the Roman army on the left, _ibid._;
  his force destroyed at Pedion Halon, III. xviii. 12, 19, xix. 18, 19,
    xxv. 15

Gizeric, king of the Vandals;
  son of Godigisclus and brother of Gontharis, III. iii. 23;
  father of Honoric, Genzon, and Theodorus, III. v. 6, 11, vi. 24;
  becomes ruler of the Vandals with his brother, III. iii. 23;
  according to one account destroyed his brother Gontharis, III. iii. 33;
  his great ability, III. iii. 24;
  invited by Boniface to share Libya, III. iii. 25;
  leads the Vandals into Libya, III. iii. 33;
  besieges Hippo Regius, III. iii. 32, 34;
  discovers Marcian among Roman captives, III. iv. 3-8;
  spares his life and makes him swear friendship to
  the Vandals, III. iv. 9, 10;
  secures possession of Libya, III. xxi. 16, xxii. 4;
  secures his power by making a compact with Valentinian and
  giving his son as a hostage, III. iv. 12-14, xvi. 13;
  receives his son back, III. iv. 14;
  receives ambassadors from the Vandals who had not emigrated,
    III. xxii. 7;
  at first hears them with favour, but later refuses their petition,
    III. xxii. 9-11;
  makes an attempt on Taenarum, III. xxii. 16;
  attacks Zacynthus and brutally massacres many of the inhabitants,
    III. xxii. 17, 18;
  invited by Eudoxia to punish Maximus, III. iv. 38, 39;
  despoils the city of Rome, III. v. 1 ff. IV. ix. 5, 8;
  takes captive Eudoxia and her daughters, III. v. 3;
  removes the walls of Libyan cities, III. v. 8, xv. 9;
  wins ridicule thereby in later times, III. v. 9;
  destroyed all the tax records of Libya, IV. viii. 25;
  enslaves notable Libyans and takes property from others, III. v. 11, 12;
  exempts confiscated lands from taxation, III. v. 14;
  with the Moors, makes many inroads into Roman provinces III. v. 22-25;
  Aspar urges Basiliscus to spare him, III. vi. 4;
  desires the appointment of Olyvrius as emperor of the West, III. vi. 6;
  his fear of Leon, III. vi. 11;
  persuades Basiliscus to delay, III. vi. 12-16;
  destroys the Roman fleet, III. vi. 17-21;
  receives Majorinus disguised as an envoy, III. vii. 6, 7, 9, 10;
  prepares to meet the army of Majorinus, III. vii. 12;
  forms a compact with Zenon, III. vii. 26, ix. 23;
  his death and his will, III. vii. 29, 30. ix. 10, xvi. 13;
  the "law of Gizeric," III. ix. 12

Glycerius, emperor of the West, dies after a very short reign, III. vii. 15

Godas, a Goth, slave of Gelimer;
  sets up a tyranny in Sardinia, III. x. 25-27. xi. 22, xxv. 11;
  invites Justinian to support him, III. x. 28-31;
  receives the envoy Eulogius, III. x. 33;
  sends him back with a letter, III. x. 34;
  the Vandals send an expedition against him, III. xi. 23, xiv. 9;
  killed by Tzazon, xi, xxiv. 1, 3, IV. ii. 27

Godigisclus, leader of the Vandals in their migration,
    III. iii. 2, xxii. 3, 5;
  settles in Spain by agreement with Honorius, III. iii. 2;
  dies in Spain, III. ii. 23;
  father of Gontharis and Gizeric, III. ii. 23

Gontharis, son of Godigisclus and brother of Gizeric;
  becomes ruler of the Vandals with his brother, III. ii. 23;
  his mild character, III. ii. 21;
  invited by Boniface to share Libya, III. ii. 25;
  his death, III. iii. 32, 33.

Gontharis, body-guard of Solomon;
  sent forward against the Moors, IV. xix. 6;
  camps near the Abigas River, IV. xix. 7;
  defeated by the Moors and besieged in his camp, IV. xix. 8;
  receives support from Solomon, IV. xix. 9;
  attempts to set up a tyranny, IV. xxv. 1 ff.;
  summoned to Carthage and sent against the Moors, IV. xxv. 4, 5;
  makes an agreement with Antalas to betray the Romans, IV. xxv. 6-10;
  recalls Roman skirmishers, IV. xxv. 14;
  hears of the treasonable plan of Coutzinas, IV. xxv. 16;
  persuades Areobindus to postpone the engagement, IV. xxv. 17, 18;
  reveals the plot to Antalas, IV. xxv. 19;
  plans to kill Areobindus, IV. xxv. 22;
  persuades him to join battle with the Moors, IV. xxv. 23 ff.;
  openly sets about establishing his tyranny, IV. xxv. 28 ff.;
  summons Athanasius, IV. xxvi. 21;
  and Areobindus, IV. xxvi. 23;
  his reception of Areobindus, IV. xxvi. 27-32;
  has him assassinated, IV. xxvi. 32, 33;
  offends Antalas by sending him the head of Areobindus, IV. xxvii. 1, 2;
  receives the mutineers under John, IV. xxvii. 7, 8;
  removes the wife and sister of Areobindus from the fortress,
    IV. xxvii. 20;
  compels Prejecta to write a false report in a letter to Justinian
    for his own advantage, IV. xxvii. 20-22;
  sends Artabanes against Antalas, IV. xxvii. 23;
  Coutzinas sides with him, IV. xxvii. 21;
  Artabanes determines to kill him, IV. xxvii. 34;
  prepares a larger army against Antalas, IV. xxvii. 36;
  destroys many in the city, IV. xxvii. 37, 38;
  entertains Artabanes and others at a banquet, IV. xxviii. 1 ff.;
  his murder planned by Artabanes, IV. xxviii. 6 ff;
  his death, IV. xxviii. 27-30

Gospels, the sacred writings of the Christians;
  oaths taken upon them, IV. xxi. 21.

Gothaeus, sent as envoy to Spain by Gelimer, III. xxiv. 7 ff.

Goths, general description of the Gothic peoples, III. ii. 2 ff.;
  their migrations, III. ii. 6 ff.;
  their common religion and language, III. ii. 5;
  enter Pannonia and then settle in Thrace for a time, III. ii. 39;
  subdue the western empire, III. ii. 40;
  in Italy, Belisarius sent against them, IV. xiv. 1;
  furnish the Roman fleet a market in Sicily, III. xiv. 5;
  refuse to give up Lilybaeum, IV. v. 11;
  receive a letter of remonstrance from Belisarius, IV. v. 12-17;
  their reply, IV. v. 18-24

Grasse, a place in Libya, III. xvii. 8, 14, 17;
  its pleasant park, III. xvii. 9, 10;
  distance from Carthage, III. xvii. 8

Greece, plundered by Gizeric, III. v. 23

Greeks, contemptuous term for the subjects of the emperor,
    IV. xxvii. 38

Gregorius, nephew of Artabanes;
  with him plans the murder of Gontharis, IV. xxviii. 7-9;
  urges Artabanes to carry out the plot, IV. xxvii. 10-19;
  takes his stand in the banquet-hall, IV. xxviii. 14;
  restrains Artasires, IV. xxviii. 16

Gundamundus, son of Gezon;
  becomes king of the Vandals, III. viii. 6;
  his reign and death, III. viii. 7;
  brother of Trasamundus, III. viii. 8

H[edit]


Hadrumetum, city in Libya, III. xvii. 8, IV. xxvii. 26, 31, 33;
  taken by the Moors, IV. xxiii. 11-15;
  recovered by Paulus, a priest, IV. xxiii. 18-25, 29;
  guarded for the emperor, IV. xxvii. 6

Harmatus, Roman General;
  marches against Zenon, III. vii. 20;
  surrenders to him, III. vii. 21;
  killed by Zenon, III. vii. 23

Hebrews, their migration from Egypt to Palestine, IV. x. 13;
  history of the, IV. x. 17

Hebrew Scripture, quoted by Gelimer, IV. ix. 11

Hellespont, strait between Sestus and Abydus, III. i. 7

Heracleia, the name of Perinthus in Procopius' time, III. xii. 6

Heracles, wrestled with Antaeus in Clipea, IV. x. 24

Heracles, Pillars of, Gibraltar, III. i. 5, 9,
  15, 18. vii. 11, IV. x. 20

Heraclius, defeats the Vandals in Tripolis, III. vi. 9;
  returns to Byzantium, III. vi. 25

Hermes, called Mercury by the Romans, III. vi. 10;
  town of Hermes or Mercurium, on the coast of Libya,
    III. vi. 10, xvii. 15, xx. 10

Hermione, town in Byzacium;
  distance from the coast, III. xiv. 10, xvii. 4, 11

Hieron, near the mouth of the Bosphorus, III. i. 8

Himerius of Thrace, commander in Byzacium; fails to unite with John,
    and falls into the hands of the Moors, IV. xxiii. 3-5;
  guarded by the Moors, IV. xxiii. 10;
  puts Hadrumetum into their hands, IV. xxiii. 10-15;
  escapes to Carthage, IV. xxiii. 17

Hippo Regius, a strong city of Numidia, III. iii. 31, IV. iv. 32;
  besieged by the Vandals, III. iii. 32, 34;
  distance from Carthage, IV. iv. 26;
  Boniface the Libyan captured there, IV. iv. 34, 36, 39

Hoamer, nephew of Ilderic;
  acts as his general, III. ix. 2;
  imprisoned by Gelimer, III. ix. 9;
  blinded by Gelimer, III. ix. 14, 17;
  his death, III. xvii. 12

Honoric, son of Gizeric;
  given as a hostage to Valentinian, III. iv. 13;
  returned, III, iv. 14;
  marries Eudocia, III. v. 6;
  receives Libyan slaves, III. v. 11;
  succeeds to the throne of the Vandals, III. viii. 1, xxi. 19;
  makes war on the Moors, III. viii. 1, 2;
  persecutes the Christians, III. viii. 3, 4;
  his death, III. viii. 5;
  father of Ilderic, III. ix. 1;
  in his reign the church of St. Cyprian taken by the Arians, III. xxi. 19

Honorius, younger son of Theodosius;
  receives the western empire, III. i. 2, ii. 1;
  brother of Arcadius and Placidia, III. iii. 4;
  the western empire overrun by barbarians during his reign, III. ii. 1;
  retires from Rome to Ravenna, III. ii. 8, 9;
  accused of bringing in the Visigoths, III. ii. 10;
  his stupid remark upon hearing of the fall of Rome, III. ii. 25, 26;
  displaced from the throne of the western empire by Attalus, III. ii. 28;
  prepares for flight either to Libya or to Byzantium, III. ii. 32;
  his good fortune in extreme peril, III. ii. 34-37;
  allows the Vandals to settle in Spain, III. iii. 2;
  provides that they shall not acquire possession of the land, III. iii. 3;
  shares royal power with Constantius, III. iii. 4;
  his death, III. iii. 4

Huns, see Massagetae.

I[edit]


Iaudas, ruler of the Moors in Aurasium, IV. xii. 29, xxv. 2;
  the best warrior among the Moors, IV. xiii. 13;
  plunders Numidia, IV. xiii. 1;
  his combat with Althias at Tigisis, IV. xiii. 10-16;
  Solomon marches against him, IV. xiii. 18;
  accused before Solomon by other Moorish rulers, IV. xiii. 19;
  slays his father-in-law Mephanius, _ibid._;
  establishes himself on Mt, Aurasium, IV. xiii. 21;
  with the mutineers of Stotzas, IV. xvii. 8;
  Solomon marches against him, IV. xix. 5;
  remains on Mt. Aurasium, IV. xix. 19;
  goes up to the top of Mt. Aurasium, IV. xix. 21;
  escapes wounded from Toumar, IV. xx. 21;
  deposited his treasures in a tower at the Rock of Geminianus, IV. xx. 24

Ilderic, son of Honoric,
  becomes king of the Vandals, III. ix. 1;
  an unwarlike ruler, _ibid._;
  uncle of Hoamer, III. ix. 2;
  suspected plot of the Goths against him, III. ix. 4;
  on terms of special friendship with Justinian, III. ix. 5;
  makes large gifts to Apollinarius, IV. v. 8;
  allows Gelimer to encroach upon his authority, III. ix. 8;
  dethroned and imprisoned, III. ix. 8, 9, 14, 17;
  killed in prison by Ammatas, III. xvii. 11, 12;
  his sons and other offspring receive rewards from Justinian
    and Theodora, IV. ix. 13

Ildiger, son-in-law of Antonina, IV. viii. 24;
  sent to Libya with an army, _ibid._;
  made joint commander of Carthage with Theodoras, IV. xv. 49;
  at the battle of Scalae Veteres, IV. xvii. 6, 19

Illyricum, III. xi. 17, 21;
  plundered by Gizeric, III. v. 23

Ionian Sea, III. i. 9, 12, 15, ii. 9, 11

Ionians, as sailors in the African expedition, III. xi. 14

Iouce, distance from Carthage, III. xv. 8

Iourpouthes, a Moorish ruler, joins in an attack upon a Roman force,
    IV. x. 6 ff.

Ister, called also the Danube, III. i. 10, ii. 6;
  crossed by the Goths, III. ii. 39

Italy the brutal destruction of its cities and people by the Visigoths,
    III. ii. 11, 12;
  invaded by Gizeric, III. v. 1 ff., 22, 23

J[edit]


Jebusites, ancient people of Phoenicia, IV. x. 17;
  emigrate to Egypt and then to Libya, IV. x. 18, 19

Jerusalem, captured by Titus, IV. ix. 5;
  Christians there receive back the treasures of the temple, IV. ix. 9

Jews, their treasures brought to Byzantium by Belisarius, IV. ix. 5;
  sent back to Jerusalem by Justinian, IV. ix. 9;
  one of them warns the Romans not to keep the treasures of the
    temple in Jerusalem, IV. ix. 6-8

John the Armenian;
  financial manager of Belisarius, III. xvii. 1, 2;
  commanded to precede the Roman army, III. xvii, 2, xviii. 3;
  engages with Ammatas at Decimum and defeats his force, III. xviii. 5, 6;
  pursues the fugitives to Carthage, III. xviii. 10, xix. 30;
  rejoins Belisarius, III. xix. 33;
  entrusted with the command of a skirmishing force, IV. ii. 1;
  in the centre at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 5;
  begins the fighting, IV. iii. 10, 12, 13;
  pursues Gelimer, IV, iv. 9, 14;
  killed accidentally by Uliaris, IV. iv. 18, 19;
  his character, IV, iv. 20;
  cared for and buried by his soldiers, IV. iv. 22;
  mourned by Belisarius, IV. iv. 24

John, father of Artabanes and John, of the Arsacidae, IV. xxiv. 2

John, commander of auxiliaries, III. xi. 6;
  on the left wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. in. 4;
  sent with an army to Caesarea, IV. v. 5

John, a general under Basiliscus;
  his excellent fighting against the Vandals, III. vi. 22-24

John the Cappadocian, urges Justinian not to make war on the Vandals,
    III. x. 7-17;
  praetorian perfect;
  supplies the army with bad bread, III. xiii. 12 ff.

John, guardsman of Belisarius;
  sent to the Pillars of Heracles with an army, IV. v. 6

John, a Roman soldier, chosen emperor, III. iii. 5;
  his virtues as a ruler, III. iii. 6, 7;
  reduced from power by Theodosius, III. iii. 8;
  captured, brutally abused, and killed by Valentinian, III. iii. 9

John of Epidamnus,
  commander-in-chief of infantry, III. xi. 8, IV. xvi. 2

John, son of John, of the Arsacidae;
  sent to Libya in command of Armenians, IV. xxiv. 2;
  brother of Artabanes, IV. xxiv. 15;
  his death, _ibid._

John the mutineer, succeeds Stotzas as general of the mutineers,
    IV. xxv. 3;
  leads the mutineers to join Gontharis, IV. xxvii. 7;
  marches with Artabanes against Antalas, IV. xxvii. 25;
  does not take part in the battle, IV, xxvii. 27;
  entertained by Pamphilus at a banquet, IV. xxviii. 5;
  taken from sanctuary, and sent to Byzantium, IV. xxviii. 39, 40

John, brother of Pappus;
  at the battle of Scalae Veteres, IV. xvii. 6, 16;
  made general of Libya, IV. xxviii. 45;
  his varying fortunes in fighting with the Moors, IV. xxviii. 46-51

John, son of Sisiniolus;
  sent as commander to Libya, IV. xix. 1;
  especially hostile to Sergius, IV. xxii. 3, 4;
  marches against the Moors, IV. xxiii. 2;
  fails to meet Himerius, IV. xxiii. 3-5;
  quarrels with Sergius, IV. xxiii. 32;
  sent against Antalas and Stotzas, IV. xxiv. C;
  meets the enemy at a great disadvantage, IV. xxiv. 8;
  his enmity against Stotzas, IV, xxiv. 9;
  gives him a mortal wound in the battle, IV. xxiv. 11;
  his army routed by the Moors, IV. xxiv. 12;
  his death, IV. xxiv. 13. 14;
  Justinian's sorrow at his death, IV. xxiv. 16

Joseph, an imperial scribe, sent as envoy to Stotzas, IV. xv. 7;
  killed by Stotzas, IV. xv. 8

Joshua ("Jesus"), son of ("Naues"), brings the Hebrews into Palestine,
    IV. x. 13;
  subjugates the country, IV. x. 14;
  mentioned in a Phoenician inscription, IV. x. 22

Juppiter Capitolinus, temple of, in Rome, despoiled by Gizeric, III. v. 4

Justinian, succeeds his uncle Justinus as emperor, III. vii. 27;
  on terms of especial friendship with Ilderic, III. ix. 5;
  sends warning to Gelimer, III. ix. 10-13;
  sends a second warning to Gelimer, III. ix. 15-19;
  approached by Apollinarius and other Libyans seeking help for Ilderic,
    IV. v. 8;
  prepares to make war upon Gelimer, III. ix. 24, 25;
  summons Belisarius from the East to command the African expedition,
    III. ix. 25;
  makes preparations for the expedition, III. x. 1 ff.;
  discouraged by John the Cappadocian, III. x. 7 ff.;
  urged by a priest to prosecute the war, III. x. 18-20;
  continues preparations III. x. 21;
  invited by Godas to support him in Sardinia, III. x. 28-31;
  sends an envoy to him, III. x. 32;
  and later an army, III. xi. 1;
  sends Valerianus and Martinus in advance of the African expedition,
    III. xi. 24;
  despatches the expedition, III. xii. 1 ff.;
  makes an agreement with Amalasountha for a market, III. xiv. 5;
  their mutual friendship, III. xiv. 6;
  his letter to the Vandals, III. xvi. 12-14;
  never properly delivered, III. xvi. 15;
  the Goths appeal to him as arbiter, IV. v. 24;
  receives report of Belisarius regarding the dispute with the Goths,
    IV. v. 25;
  hears slander against Belisarius, IV. viii. 2;
  sends Solomon to test him, IV. viii. 4;
  sends the Jewish treasures back to Jerusalem, IV. ix. 9;
  receives the homage of Gelimer and of Belisarius, IV. ix. 12;
  distributes rewards to Gelimer and others, IV. ix. 13;
  sends Belisarius against the Goths in Italy, IV. xiv. 1;
  sends Germanus to Libya, IV. xvi. 1;
  entrusts Solomon again with the command of Libya, IV. xix. 1;
  receives a letter from Antalas, IV. xxii. 6-10;
  refuses to recall Sergius, IV. xxii. 11;
  sends Areobindus to Libya IV. xxiv. 1;
  recalls Sergius and sends him to Italy, IV. xxiv. 16;
  appoints Artabanes general of all Libya, IV. xxviii. 43;
  summons him to Byzantium, IV. xxviii. 44;
  uncle of Germanus, IV. xvi. 1;
  and of Vigilantia, IV. xxiv. 3;
  the Vandals of, IV. xiv. 17;
  excluded all not of the orthodox faith from the church, IV. xiv. 14;
  years of reign noted, III. xii. 1, IV. xiv. 6, xix. 1, xxi. 1, xxviii. 41

Justinus, Roman emperor, uncle of Justinian, III. vii. 27;
  not a vigorous or skilful ruler, III. ix. 5;
  Ilderic accused of betraying the Vandals to him, III. ix. 8

L[edit]


Laribus or Laribous, city in Libya, IV. xxii. 14, xxviii. 48;
  attacked by the Moors, IV. xxii. 18-20

Latin tongue, the, III. i. 6, IV. xiii. 33

Laurus, a Carthaginian;
  impaled by Belisarius, IV. i. 8

Leon, emperor of the East, III. v. 7;
  sends an expedition against the Vandals, III. vi. 1 ff., xx. 2;
  quarrels with Aspar, III. vi. 3;
  appoints Anthemius emperor of the West, III. vi. 5;
  wins over the tyrant Marcellianus and sends him against the
      Vandals in Sardinia, III. vi. 8;
  dreaded by Gizeric, III. vi. 11;
  his expedition destroyed by the Vandals, III. vi. 17 ff.;
  destroys Aspar and Ardaburius, III. vi. 27;
  his death, III. vii. 2;
  husband of Berine, III. vi. 2;
  father of Ariadne, III. vii. 2

Leon the younger, son of Zenon and Ariadne, III. vii. 2;
  becomes emperor while an infant, III. vii. 2;
  dies soon afterwards, III. vii. 3

Leontius, son of Zaunus, sent as commander to Libya, IV. xix. 1;
  fights valorously at the capture of Toumar, IV. xx. 19;
  brother of Rufinus, _ibid._

Leptes, city in Libya, III. xvii. 8

Leptimagna, city in Tripolis;
  threatened by an army of Leuathae, IV. xxi. 2, 13, 15

Lesbos, passed by the fugitive Vandals, IV. xiv. 18

Leuathae, tribe of Moors;
  present demands to Sergius, IV. xxi. 2;
  their representatives received by Sergius and killed, IV. xxi. 4-10;
  come in arms against Leptimagna, IV. xxi. 12;
  routed by the Romans, IV. xxi. 14;
  march against the Romans a second time, IV. xxi. 16;
  scorn the overtures of Solomon, IV. xxi. 20-22;
  capture Solomon, son of Bacchus, IV. xxii. 13;
  release him, IV. xxii. 16;
  besiege Laribus, IV. xxii. 18;
  depart to their homes IV. xxii. 20;
  join the Moors of Byzacium against the Romans, IV. xxviii. 47

Libya, included in "Asia," III. i. 5;
  its aborigines, IV. x. 23;
  the Phoenicians emigrate thither, IV. x. 19;
  Phoenician tongue used there, IV. x. 20;
  subjugated by the Romans, IV. x. 28;
  failure of the Visigothic king Attalus to get a foothold there,
    III. ii. 30, 32, 36;
  lost by Valentinian, III. iii. 12;
  occupied by the Vandals, III. iii. 26, xxii. 4;
  who remove the walls of the cities, III. v. 8, xv. 9;
  recovered for the Romans by Belisarius, III. xvi. 9 ff.;
  prospers under the rule of Solomon, IV. xix. 3, xx. 33;
  who restores the walls of the cities, IV. xix. 3, xx. 29;
  overrun by the Moors, IV. xxiii. 26-31, xxviii. 49

Libyans, enslaved and impoverished by Gizeric, III. v. 11-13, 15-17;
  cannot trust the Vandals, III. xvi. 3;
  their sufferings at the hands of the Vandals, III. xx. 19;
  oppressed by the Moors, IV. viii. 20, xxiii. 27;
  enjoy peace at last, IV. xxviii. 52

Liguria, the army of Majorinus halts there, III. vii. 4, 11

Lilybaeum, a promontory of Sicily;
  presented to Amalafrida, III. viii. 13;
  Belisarius attempts unsuccessfully to take it, IV. v. 11;
  he asserts his claim, IV. v. 12 ff.;
  the claim denied by the Goths, IV. v. 19 ff.

M[edit]


Massagetae, called Huns in Procopius' time, III. xi. 9;
  their love of wine, III. xii. 8;
  their custom of allowing only members of a certain family to begin
    a battle, III. xviii. 14;
  in the army of Aetius, III. iv. 24;
  in the African expedition of Belisarius, III. xi. 11, xii. 8-10,
  xvii. 3, xviii. 3, 12, 17, xix. 18, 33, IV. xiii. 2;
  their doubtful allegiance, IV. i. 5, 6, 9-11, ii. 3, iii. 7, 16;
  with the mutineers under John, IV. xxvii. 8

Maeotic Lake, at the eastern extremity of the "Mediterranean," III. i. 4;
  limit of the Euxine, III. i. 10;
  home of the Vandals, III. iii. 1

Majorica, island in the western Mediterranean, III. i. 18;
  Apollinarius sent thither with an army, IV. v. 7

Majorinus, emperor of the West;
  makes an expedition against the Vandals, III. vii. 4-13;
  disguised as an envoy and received by Gizeric, III. vii. 8-10;
  his death, III. vii. 14

Malea, southern promontory of the Peloponnesus, III. xiii. 5

Mammes, a place in Byzacium;
  Solomon encamps there, IV. xi. 15;
  battle fought there, IV. xi. 47-54

Mandracium, the harbour of Carthage, III. xx. 14, 15,
    IV. viii. 7, xxvi. 10;
  opened to the Roman fleet, III. xx. 3;
  entered by Calonymus with a few ships, III. xx. 16

Marcellianus, rules as independent tyrant over Dalmatia, III. vi. 7;
  won over by Leon and sent to Sardinia against the Vandals, III. vi. 8;
  destroyed by treachery, III. vi. 25

Marcellus, commander of auxiliaries, III. xi. 6;
  on the left wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 4;
  commander-in-chief of Roman forces in Numidia, IV. xv. 50, 51;
  leads his army against Stotzas, IV. xv. 52;
  his death, IV. xv. 59

Marcentius, commander in Byzacium;
  persuaded by Antalas to join him, IV. xxvii. 5, 6, 31

Marcian, confidential adviser of Aspar, III. iv. 7;
  taken prisoner by Gizeric, III. iv. 2;
  his career foreshadowed by a sign, III. iv. 4-8;
  spared by Gizeric, III. iv. 9, 10;
  becomes emperor of the East, III. iv. 10, 39;
  his successful reign, III. iv. 11;
  his death, III. v. 7

Marcian, commander of infantry, III. xi. 7

Martinus, commander of auxiliaries, III. xi. 6, 29;
  sent with Valerian in advance of the African expedition, III. xi. 24;
  meets the Roman fleet at Methone, III. xiii. 9;
  on the left wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 4;
  escapes with Solomon from the mutiny in Carthage IV. xiv. 37-40;
  sent back to Numidia, IV. xiv. 40;
  summoned to Byzantium, IV. xix. 2

Massonas, son of Mephanias;
  a Moorish ruler, accuses Iaudas to Solomon, IV. xiii. 19

Mastigas, Moorish ruler, IV. xx. 31

Mastinas, ruler of Moors in Mauretania, IV. xiii. 19

Mauritania, occupied by the Moors, IV. x. 29;
  Moors of, seek alliance with the Romans, III. xxv. 3;
  ruled by Mastinas IV. xiii. 19;
  fugitive Vandals return thither, IV. xiv. 19;
  Iaudas retires thither, IV. xx. 21;
  "First Mauritania," called Zabe, subjugated by Solomon, IV. xx. 30;
  Stotzas comes thence to joiZabetalas, IV. xxii. 5;
  adjoins Numidia, III. xxv. 21;
  city of Caesarea there, IV. v. 5

Maximinus, body-guard of Theodorus the Cappadocian;
  tries to set up a tyranny, IV. xviii. 1-3;
  upon invitation of Germanus, becomes a body-guard of
  his, IV. xviii. 6, 7;
  his attempt frustrated by Germanus, IV. xviii. 8-15;
  examined by Germanus and impaled, IV. xviii. 17, 18

Maximus the elder, his tyranny, III. iv. 16;
  the festival celebrating his defeat, _ibid._

Maximus, a Roman senator, III. iv. 16;
  his wife outraged by Valentinian, III. iv. 17-22;
  plans to murder Valentinian, III. iv. 24;
  slanders and destroys Aetius, III. iv. 25-27;
  kills Valentinian, and makes himself tyrant, III. iv. 36;
  stoned to death, III. v. 2

Medeos, city at the foot of Mt. Papua in Numidia, IV. iv. 27

Medic garments, _i.e._ silk;
  called "seric" in Procopius' time, as coming from the Chinese (Seres);
  worn by the Vandals, IV. vi. 7

Medissinissas, a Moorish ruler;
  joins in an attack upon a Roman force, IV. x. 6 ff.;
  slays Rufinus, IV. x. 11

Megara, its distance from Athens the measure of a one day's journey,
    III. i. 17

Melanchlaenae, an old name for the Goths, III. ii. 2

Melita, island between the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian Seas (Malta),
  III. xiv. 16

Membresa, city in Libya, IV. xv. 12;
  distance from Carthage, _ibid._

Menephesse, place in Byzacium, IV. xxiii. 3

Mephanias, a Moor, father of Massonas, and father-in-law of Iaudas,
    IV. xiii. 10;
  treacherously slain by Iaudas, _ibid._

Mercurium, a town near Carthage, III. vi. 10, xvii. 15, xx. 10

Mercurius, the Latin name for Hermes, III. vi. 10

Methone, a town in the Peloponnesus, III. xiii. 9;
  the Roman fleet stops there, III. xiii. 9-21

Minorica, island in the western Mediterranean, III. i. 18;
  Apollinarius sent thither with an army, IV. v. 7

Misuas, the ship-yard of Carthage, IV. xiv. 40

Monks, their monastery in Carthage, IV. xxvi. 17

Moors, a black race of Africa, IV. xiii. 29;
  an account of their origin in Palestine, and migration westward,
    IV. x. 13 ff.;
  driven away from Carthage, IV. x. 27, 28;
  possess themselves of much of Libya, IV. x. 29;
  take Mt. Aurasium from the Vandals, IV. xiii. 26, 27;
  those beyond Mt. Aurasium ruled by Ortaïas, IV. xiii. 28;
  on Aurasium, ruled by Iaudas, IV. xii. 29, xiii. 1;
  of Mauritania, ruled by Mastinas, IV. xiii. 19;
  inhabit Mt. Papua, IV. iv. 27, vi. 19, 20;
  not merged with the Vandals, III. v. 21;
  their alliance secured by Gizeric, III. v. 22;
  make war on the Vandals, III. viii. 1, 2;
  dwelling on Mt. Aurasium, establish their independence from the Vandals,
    III. viii. 5;
  their wars with Gundamundus, III. viii. 7;
  inflict a great disaster upon the Vandals, III. viii. 15-28;
  of Byzacium, defeat the Vandals, III. ix. 3;
  most of them seek alliance with the Romans, III. xxv. 2-4,
    IV. viii. 11 ff.;
  their doubtful fidelity, III. xxv. 9;
  stationed in the rear of the Vandals at the battle of Tricamarum,
    IV. iii. 8;
  threaten the Roman power in Tripolis, IV. v. 10;
  on Mt. Papua, drive back Pharas and his men, IV. vi. 1-3;
  of Byzacium and Numidia, rise and overrun the
  country, IV. viii. 20-23, x. 1, 2;
  caught by Aïgan and Rufinus in an ambush, IV. x. 5;
  in turn annihilate the Roman force, IV. x. 6 ff.;
  receive a warning letter from Solomon, IV. xi. 1-8;
  their reply, IV. xi. 9-13;
  Solomon marches against them, IV. xi. 14;
  prepare for battle at Mammes, IV. xi. 17, 18, 37-46;
  defeated by the Romans, IV. xi. 47-54;
  rise against the Romans a second time, IV. xii. 1;
  establish themselves on Mt. Bourgaon, IV. xii. 3-9;
  suffer a crushing defeat, IV. xii. 17 ff.;
  finally understand their ancient prophecy, IV. xii. 28;
  emigrate from Byzacium to Numidia, IV. xii, 29;
  those under Antalas remain in Byzacium, IV. xii. 30;
  of Aurasium, take up arms under Iaudas, IV. xiii. 1 ff.;
  checked by Althias at the spring of Tigisis, IV. xiii. 8, 9;
  in the army of Solomon, IV. xiii. 20;
  elude Solomon on Mt. Aurasium, IV. xiii. 35, 36;
  Solomon prepares another expedition against them, IV. xiii. 40;
  with the mutineers of Stotzas, IV. xvii. 8;
  their uncertain allegiance, IV. xvii. 9-12;
  join in the pursuit of the mutineers, IV. xvii. 31;
  on Aurasium; Solomon marches against them, IV. xix. 5;
  defeat Gontharis, IV. xix. 8;
  flood the Roman camp, IV. xix. 14;
  retire to Mt. Aurasium, IV. xix. 16;
  defeated by Solomon, retire to the heights of Aurasium, IV. xix. 17, 18;
  abandon the fortress of Zerboule to the Romans, IV. xix. 23-32;
  overwhelmingly defeated at Toumar, IV, xx. 1 ff.;
  defeat the Romans under Solomon, IV. xxi. 25-28;
  gather under Antalas, IV. xxii. 5;
  tricked by Solomon the younger, IV. xxii. 12-17;
  attack Laribus, IV. xxii. 18-20;
  gathered a second time by Antalas, IV. xxiii. 1;
  capture Himerius and take Hadrumetum, IV. xxiii. 10-15;
  lose Hadrumetum, IV. xxiii. 25;
  pillage all Libya unhindered, IV. xxiii. 26-32;
  defeat the Roman army at Siccaveneria, IV. xxiv. 8-12;
  at the invitation of Gontharis, march against Carthage, IV. xxv. 1, 2;
  of Coutzinas, in the army of Artabanes, IV. xxvii. 25;
  of Byzacium, defeated by John, IV. xxviii. 46;
  with the Leuathae defeat John, IV. xxviii. 47, 48;
  routed in a third battle, IV. xxviii. 50, 51;
  of Coutzinas, in alliance with John, IV. xxviii. 50;
  in Sardinia, Solomon prepares an expedition against them,
    IV. xiii. 41, 45;
  sent thither by the Vandals, IV. xiii. 43;
  overrun the island, IV. xiii. 42, 44;
  called Barbaricini, IV. xiii. 44;
  their polygamy, IV. xi. 13;
  untrustworthy by nature, IV. xiii. 37, xvii. 10,
  even among themselves, IV. xxv. 16;
  suspicious toward all, IV. xxvi. 2;
  their hardiness as a nation, IV. vi. 5, 10-13;
  their reckless character, IV. viii. 10;
  their female oracles, IV. viii. 13;
  their method of cooking bread, IV. vii. 3;
  accustomed to take some women with their armies, IV. xi. 18, 19;
  undesirable allies, IV. xiii. 40;
  not practised in storming walls, IV. xxii. 20;
  not diligent in guarding captives, IV. xxiii. 17;
  the symbols of kingship among them received from the Roman
  emperor, III. xxv. 5-7;
  Moorish old man, guardian of Iaudas' treasures, IV. xx. 24;
  slain by a Roman soldier, IV. xx. 27;
  Moorish woman, IV. vii. 3

Moses, leader of the Hebrews, his death, IV. x. 13

N[edit]


Nepos, emperor of the West, dies after a reign of a few days, III. vii. 15

Numidia, in Africa, adjoins Mauritania, III. xxv. 21;
  its boundary near the plain of Boulla, III. xxv. 1;
  Mt. Papua on its borders, IV. iv. 27;
  includes Mt. Aurasium, III. viii. 5;
  and the city of Hippo Regius, III. iii. 31, IV. iv. 26;
  and the city of Tigisis, IV. x. 21;
  Moors of, seek alliance with the Romans, III. xxv. 3;
  plundered by the Moors, IV. viii. 9, x. 2;
  plundered by Iaudas, IV. xiii. 1, 18;
  a place of retreat for the mutineers of Stotzas, IV. xv. 44, 50, xvii. 1;
  Romans retire from there, IV. xx. 30;
  Gontharis commander there, IV. xxv. 1;
  Moors of, march out against Carthage, IV. xxv. 2

Nun ("Naues"), father of Joshua ("Jesus"), IV. x. 13, 22

O[edit]


Ocean, Procopius' conception of it as encircling the earth, III. 1. 4

Olyvrius, Roman senator, husband of Placidia, III. v. 6, vi. 6;
  becomes emperor of the West; killed after a short reign, III. vii. 1

Optio (Latin), a kind of adjutant in the Roman army,
    III. xvii. 1, IV. xx. 12

Ortaïas, Moorish ruler beyond Mt. Aurasium, IV. xiii. 19, 28;
  accuses Iaudas to Solomon, IV. xiii. 19;
  with the mutineers of Stotzas, IV. xvii. 8;
  his report of the country beyond his own, IV. xiii. 29

P[edit]


Palatium, the imperial residence in Rome; said to be named from Pallas,
    III. xxi. 4;
  despoiled by Gizeric, III. v. 34, IV. ix. 5

Palestine, settlement of the Hebrews there, IV. x. 13;
  Moors emigrated therefrom, IV. x. 27

Pallas, an "eponymous" hero, used to explain the word "Palatium,"
    III. xxi. 4

Pannonia, entered by the Goths, III. ii. 39

Pappus, brother of John, IV. xvii. 6, xxviii. 45;
  commander of cavalry, III. xi. 7;
  on the right wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 4

Papua, mountain in Numidia, IV. iv. 27;
  Gelimer takes refuge there, IV. 26, 28;
  its ascent attempted by Pharas, IV. vi. 1;
  closely besieged, IV. iv. 28, vi. 3;
  Cyprian sent thither to receive Gelimer, IV. vii. 11

Pasiphilus, a mutineer in the Roman army; active supporter of Gontharis,
    IV. xxvii. 21, 22, 36, 38;
  entertains John at a banquet, IV. xxviii. 3;
  his death, IV. xxviii. 39

Patrician rank, III. ii. 15, xi. 17, IV. vi. 22, xvi. 1;
  Gelimer excluded from it because of Arianism, IV. ix. 14

Paulus, a priest of Hadrumetum;
  rescues the city from the Moors, IV. xxiii. 18-25;
  comes to Byzantium, IV. xxiii. 29

Pedion Halon, in Libya, distance from Decimum;
  forces of Gibamundus destroyed there, III. xviii. 12

Pegasius, friend of Solomon the younger, IV. xxii. 14, 15

Peloponnesus, III. xi. 24, IV. xiv. 18;
  plundered by Gizeric, III. v. 23, xxii. 16

Pentapolis, part of Libya;
  its rule falls to Cyrus, IV. xxi. 1

Perinthus, called Heracleia in Procopius' time, III, xii. 6

Persians, III. xix. 7;
  make peace with the Romans, III. i. 1, ix. 25, 26;
  Vandals fight against them IV. xiv. 18

Peter, Roman general, accused by the Massagetae of unfair dealing, IV. i. 6

Peter, of Thrace, body-guard of Solomon;
  at the banquet of Gontharis, IV. xxviii. 3;
  looks with approval upon Artabanes' plot, IV. xxviii. 24, 28;
  with Artabanes cuts down the body-guards who remain, IV. xxviii. 33

Pharas, leader of Eruli, in the African expedition, III. xi. 11;
  left in charge of the siege of Gelimer on Mt. Papua,
    IV. iv. 28, 31, vi. 1, 3;
  his correspondence with Gelimer, IV. vi. 15-30, vii. 6-9;
  learns the reasons for Gelimer's peculiar request, and fulfils it,
    IV. vi. 31-34;
  reports to Belisarius, IV. vii. 10;
  his good qualities, IV. iv. 29, 31;
  an uneducated man, IV. vi. 15

Pharesmanes, father of Zaunas, IV. xix. 1, xx. 19

Phasis River, in Colchis, III. i. 11;
  distance from Chalcedon, _ibid._

Phoenicia, its extent, IV. x. 15;
  ruled by one king in ancient times, IV. x. 16;
  home of various peoples, IV. x. 17;
  Dido's emigration therefrom, IV. x. 25;
  Phoenician tongue, spoken in Libya, IV. x. 20;
  Phoenician writing, on two stones in Numidia IV. x. 22

Phredas, friend of Areobindus, sent by him to Gontharis, IV. xxvi. 8, 9

Placidia, sister of Arcadius and Honorius and wife of
  Constantius, III. iii. 4;
  mother of Valentinian, brings him up in vicious ways, III. iii. 10;
  as regent for her son, appoints Boniface general of all
  Libya, III. iii. 16;
  gives ear to Aetius' slander of Boniface, III. iii. 17, 18;
  summons him to Rome, III. iii. 18;
  sends men to Boniface at Carthage, III. iii. 27;
  upon learning the truth tries to bring him back, III. iii. 28, 29;
  finally receives him back, III. iii. 36;
  her death, III. iv. 15

Placidia, daughter of Eudoxia and wife of Olyvrius;
  taken captive by Gizeric, III. v. 3, vi. 6;
  sent to Byzantium, III. v. 6

Pontus, see Euxine

Praetor, III. x. 3

Praetorian, see Prefect

Prefect, praetorian prefect (lit. "of the court"),
    III. x. 3, 7, xi. 17, xiii. 12;
  of the army, "financial manager," III. xi. 17. cf.
  III. xv. 13, xvii, 16, IV. xvi. 2

Prejecta, daughter of Vigilantia and wife of Areobindus, accompanies
      him to Libya, IV. xxiv. 3;
  placed in a fortress for her safety, IV. xxvi. 18;
  removed from the fortress by Gontharis and compelled to give a
  false report in a letter to Justinian, IV. xxvii. 20;
  presents a great sum of money to Artabanes, IV. xxviii. 43

Proba, a notable woman of Rome;
  according to one account opened the gates of the city to Alaric,
    III. ii. 27

Procopius, author of the History of the Wars;
  sails with Belisarius for Africa, III. xii. 3;
  his reassuring dream, III. xii. 3-5;
  sent by Belisarius to Syracuse to get information, III. xiv. 3, 4, 7-13;
  praised by Belisarius III. xiv. 15;
  congratulates Belisarius upon a good omen, III. xv. 35;
  escapes from Carthage with Solomon, IV. xiv. 39;
  goes to Belisarius in Syracuse, IV. xiv. 41

Pudentius, of Tripolis;
  recovers this country for the Roman empire, III. x. 22-24, xi. 22,
    IV. xxi. 3;
  receives support from Belisarius, IV. v. 10;
  persuades Sergius to receive only representatives of the
  Leuathae, IV. xxi. 3;
  rights against the Leuathae, IV. xxi. 13, 14;
  his death, IV. xxii. 15

R[edit]


Ravenna, city in Italy;
  the refuge of Honorius, III. ii. 9, 25;
  attacked by Alaric and Attalus, III. ii. 29

Reparatus, priest of Carthage;
  sent by Gontharis to summon Areobindus, IV. xxvi. 23;
  with difficulty persuades him to come, IV. xxvi. 24-27;
  dismissed by Gontharis, IV. xxvi. 31

Rhecimer, slays his father-in-law Anthemius, emperor of the West,
    III. vii. 1

Rhine River, crossed by the Vandals, III. iii. 1

Romans, subjects of the Roman empire, both in the East and in the West;
    mentioned constantly throughout;
  celebrate a festival commemorating the overthrow of Maximus,
    III. iv. 16;
  accustomed to enter subject cities in disorder, III. xxi. 9;
  require especial oaths of loyalty from body-guards of officers,
    IV. xviii. 6;
  subjugate the peoples of Libya, IV. x. 28;
  lose Libya to Gizeric and the Vandals, III. iii. 31-35;
  send an unsuccessful expedition under Basiliscus against the Vandals,
    III. vi. 1-24;
  make peace with the Persians, III. ix. 26;
  send a second expedition under Belisarius, III. xi. 1 ff.;
  defeat the Vandals at Decimum, III. xviii. 5-19, xix. 31-33;
  at Tricamarum, IV. ii. 4 ff.;
  defeat the Moors at the battle of Mammes, IV. xi. 47-54;
  on Mt. Bourgaon, IV. xii. 19 ff.;
  and on Mt. Aurasium, IV. xix. 5-xx. 22;
  further conflicts with the Moors, IV. xi.-xxviii.;
  poverty of the Roman soldiers, IV. iv. 3;
  their marriages with the Vandal women, IV. xiv. 8;
  and their desire for the Vandals estates, IV. xiv. 10;
  they make a mutiny, IV. xiv. 7 ff.

Rome, abandoned by Honorius, III. ii. 8, 9;
  completely sacked by the Visigoths, III. ii. 13;
  captured by Alaric, III. ii. 14-23;
  sacked by Alaric, III. ii. 24;
  according to one account, was delivered over to Alaric by Proba,
    III. ii. 27;
  the suffering of the city during the siege of Alaric, III. ii. 27;
  despoiled by Gizeric, III. v. 1 ff., IV. ix. 5

Rome, name of a cock of the Emperor Honorius, III. ii. 26

Rufinus, of Thrace;
  of the house of Belisarius and his standard-bearer, IV. x. 3, 4;
  commander of cavalry, III. xi. 7;
  makes a successful attack upon the Moors in Byzacium, IV. x. 5;
  his force in turn annihilated by the Moors, IV. x. 6 ff;
  captured and killed, IV. x. 10, 11, xi. 22

Rufinus, son of Zaunas and brother of Leontius;
  sent as commander to Libya, IV. xix. 1;
  fights valorously at the capture of Toumar, IV. xx. 19

S[edit]


Salarian Gate, at Rome, III. ii. 17, 22

Sallust, Roman historian, the house of, burned by Alaric, III. ii. 24

Sarapis, commander of Roman infantry, III. xi. 7, IV. xv. 50;
  his death, IV. xv. 59

Sardinia, its size compared with that of Sicily, IV. xiii. 42;
  half way between Rome and Carthage, _ibid._;
  recovered by the Romans from the Vandals, III. vi. 8, 11;
  occupied by the tyrant Godas, III. x. 26, 27;
  Gelimer sends an expedition to recover it, III. xi. 22, 23;
  subdued by Tzazon, III, xxiv. 1, 3, IV. ii. 25;
  avoided by Cyril, III. xxiv. 19;
  Tzazon and his men summoned thence by Gelimer, III. xxv. 10, 17, 24, 25;
  recovered for the Roman empire by Cyril, IV. v. 2, 4;
  Solomon sends an expedition against the Moors who had overrun the island,
    IV. xiii. 41-45

Sauromatae, an old name for the Goths, III. ii. 2

Scalae Veteres, place in Numidia, IV. xvii. 3

Scythians, a barbarian people, III. xix. 7;
  in the army of Attila, III. iv. 24

Scriptures of the Christians;
  Areobindus seeks to protect himself by them, IV. xxvi. 27;
  see also Gospel, and Hebrew Scriptures

Septem, fort at the Pillars of Heracles, III. i. 6;
  John sent thither with an army, IV. v. 6

Sergius, son of Bacchus, and brother of Cyrus;
  becomes ruler of Tripolis in Libya, IV. xxi. 1;
  brother of Solomon the younger, IV. xxi. 19;
  threatened by an army of Leuathae, IV. xxi, 2;
  receives representative from them, IV. xxi. 3 ff.;
  meets them in battle, IV. xxi. 13, 14;
  retires into the city, IV. xxi. 15;
  and receives help from Solomon, IV. xxi. 16, 19;
  succeeds Solomon in the command of Libya, IV. xxii. 1;
  his misrule, IV. xxii, 2;
  his recall demanded by Antalas, IV. xxii. 9, 10;
  Justinian refuses to recall him, IV. xxii. 11;
  appealed to by Paulus to save Hadrumetum, but does nothing,
    IV. xxiii. 20, 21;
  quarrels with John, son of Sisiniolus, IV. xxii. 3; xxiii. 32;
  shares the rule of Libya with Areobindus, IV. xxiv. 4, 5;
  departs to Numidia, IV. xxiv. 6;
  disregards Areobindus' instructions to unite with John, IV. xxiv. 7, 8;
  recalled and sent to Italy, IV. xxiv. 16, XXV. 1

Seric, see Medic Garments, IV. vi. 7

Sestus, city on the Hellespont, III. i. 8

Severianus, son of Asiaticus, a Phoenician;
  his daring encounter with the Moors, IV. xxiii. 6-9;
  escapes to Carthage, IV. xxiii. 17

Shield Mountain (Clypea), ancient fort on Aurasium, IV. xiii. 33

Shoal's Head, see Caputvada, III. xiv. 17

Siccaveneria, city in Libya;
  distance from Carthage, IV. xxiv. 6

Sicily, its size compared with that of Sardinia, IV. xiii. 42;
  invaded by Gizeric, III. v. 22, 23;
  concessions given the Vandals there, III. viii. 13, IV. v. 21;
  reached by the Roman fleet, III. xiii. 22;
  expedition sent thither by Belisarius, IV. v. 11;
  claimed by the Goths, IV. v. 19;
  subjugated by Belisarius, IV. xiv. 1;
  a mutiny there causes Belisarius to return to it, IV. xv. 48, 49;
  refuge of Libyans, IV. xxiii. 28

Sidon, city at the extremity of Phoenicia, IV. x. 15

Sigeum, promontory on the coast of the Troad, III. xiii. 5

Singidunum, town in the land of the Gepaides, modern Belgrade, III. ii. 6

Sinnion, leader of the Massagetae, III. xi. 12

Sirmium, town in the land of the Gepaides, III. ii. 6

Sisiniolus, father of John, IV. xix. 1, xxii. 3, xxiii. 2, xxiv. 6

Sitiphis, metropolis of "First Mauritania," IV. xx. 30

Sittas, Roman general; slain by Artabanes, IV. xxvii. 17

Sophia, name of the great church in Byzantium, III. vi. 26

Solomon, commander of auxiliaries, III. xi. 5;
  a eunuch, III. xi. 6;
  a native of the country about Daras, III. xi. 9;
  uncle of Bacchus, IV. xxi. 1;
  sent to report Belisarius' victory to the emperor, III. xxiv. 19;
  returns to Libya, IV. viii. 4;
  left by Belisarius in charge of Libya, IV. viii. 23;
  receives reinforcements from Byzantium, IV. viii. 24;
  disturbed by the news of uprisings in Libya, IV. x. 1 _ff._;
  writes to the Moorish leaders, IV. xi. 1-8;
  their reply, IV. xi. 9-13;
  moves against the Moors with his whole army, IV. xi. 14;
  addresses his troops, IV. xi. 23-36;
  inflicts a crushing defeat upon the enemy at Mammes, IV. xi. 15 ff.;
  receives word of the second Moorish uprising, and marches back,
    IV. xii. 2;
  wins a brilliant victory on Mt. Bourgaon, IV. xii. 3 ff.;
  moves against Iaudas, IV. xiii. 18;
  instigated against him by other Moorish leaders, IV. xiii. 19;
  encamps on the Abigas River, IV. xiii. 20;
  ascends Mt. Aurasium with few provisions, IV. xiii. 30-33;
  eluded by the Moors, IV. xiii. 35, 36;
  returns to Carthage, IV. xiii. 39;
  prepares a second expedition against Mt. Aurasium, IV. xiii. 40;
  and against Sardinia, IV. xiii. 41. 45;
  passes the winter in Carthage, IV. xiv. 4;
  opposed by the soldiers in regard to confiscated lands, IV. xiv. 10;
  plan to assassinate him, IV. xiv. 22;
  his guards implicated in the plot, IV. xiv. 23;
  failure of the conspirators to act, IV. xiv. 24-27;
  tries to win back the loyalty of his men, IV. xiv. 30;
  insulted openly, IV. xiv. 31;
  sends Theodorus to the mutineers, IV. xiv. 32;
  his enmity toward Theodorus, IV. xiv. 33;
  his acquaintances killed by the mutineers, IV. xiv. 36;
  flees to a sanctuary in the palace, IV. xiv. 37;
  joined by Martinus there, _ibid._;
  they come out to the house of Theodorus, IV. xiv. 38;
  escape in a boat to Misuas, whence he sends Martinus to
  Numidia, IV. xiv. 40;
  writes to Theodorus, and departs to Syracuse, IV. xiv. 41;
  begs Belisarius to come to Carthage, IV. xiv. 42;
  returns with him, IV. xv. 9;
  entrusted again with the command of Libya, IV. xix. 1;
  his prosperous rule, IV. xix. 3, 4, xx. 33;
  marches against Iaudas once more, IV. xix. 5;
  sends Gontharis ahead, IV. xix. 6;
  hears of the defeat of Gontharis, IV. xix. 9;
  advances to the camp of Gontharis, thence to Babosis, IV. xix. 16;
  defeats the Moors in battle, IV. xix. 17;
  plunders the plain and then returns to Zerboule, IV. xix. 20;
  which he unexpectedly captures, IV. xix. 25-31;
  his care of the water supply during the siege of Toumar, IV. xx. 3;
  addresses the army, IV. xx. 4-9;
  tries to find a point of attack, IV. xx. 10, 11;
  fortifies Mt. Aurasium against the Moors, IV. xx, 22;
  fortifies many Libyan cities with money captured from Iaudas,
    IV. xix. 3, xx. 29;
  subjugates Zabe, or "First Mauritania," IV. xx. 30;
  appealed to by Sergius for help, IV. xxi. 16;
  incurs the enmity of Antalas, IV. xxi. 17, xxii. 7, 8;
  marches against the Moors, IV. xxi. 19;
  his overtures scorned by the Leuathae, IV. xxi. 20-22;
  captures some booty and refuses to distribute it to the
  soldiers, IV. xxi. 23, 24;
  defeated by the Moors and slain, IV. xxi. 25-28;
  Justinian's regard for him, IV. xxii. 11;
  builds and fortifies a monastery in Carthage, IV. xxvi. 17;
  standards of, recovered from the Moors, IV. xxviii. 46

Solomon the younger, brother of Cyrus and Sergius;
  marches with Solomon against the Moors, IV. xxi. 19;
  his capture and release, IV. xxii. 12-17

Solomon, king of the Jews, IV. ix. 7

Sophia, temple of, in Byzantium;
  appropriateness of its name, III. vi. 26

Spain, settled by the Vandals, III. iii. 2, 22;
  invaded by Constantinus, III. ii. 31;
  settled by the Visigoths, III. iii. 26. xxiv. 7, IV. iv. 34

Stagnum, a harbour near Carthage, III. xv. 15;
  the Roman fleet anchors there, III. xx. 15, 16

Stotzas, a body-guard of Martinus, destined not to return to
  Byzantium, III. xi. 30;
  chosen tyrant by the mutineers, IV. xv. 1;
  marches on Carthage, IV. xv. 2;
  invites the Vandals to join his army, IV. xv. 3, 4;
  demands the surrender of Carthage, IV. xv. 5;
  kills the envoy Joseph, and besieges Carthage, IV. xv. 8;
  addresses his troops, IV. xv. 30-39;
  defeated by Belisarius, IV. xv. 40 ff.;
  his forces gather in Numidia, IV. xv. 50;
  the Romans march against him at Gazophyla, IV. xv. 52;
  comes alone into the Roman army and addresses the soldiers,
    IV. xv. 53-57;
  received with favour, IV. xv. 58;
  kills the Roman commanders in a sanctuary, IV. xv. 59;
  eager to fight a battle with Germanus, IV. xvi. 8;
  approaches Carthage, hoping for defection from there, IV. xvi. 9, 10;
  his hopes falsified, IV. xvii. 1;
  defeated by Germanus at Scalae Veteres, IV. xvii. 3 ff.;
  escapes with a few men, IV. xvii. 24;
  hopes to renew the battle with the help of the Moors, IV. xvii. 32;
  makes his escape with difficulty, IV. xvii. 33;
  suffers another defeat, IV. xvii. 34;
  withdraws to Mauritania and marries the daughter of a Moorish
  chief, IV. xvii. 35;
  the end of his mutiny, _ibid._; IV. xix. 3;
  joins Antalas, IV. xxii. 5, xxiii. 1;
  receives Roman captives, IV. xxiii. 10, 17;
  joins the Moors in plundering Libya, IV. xxiii. 26-31;
  Areobindus sends an army against him, IV. xxiv. 6;
  his enmity against John, IV, xxiv. 9;
  mortally wounded by him in battle, IV. xxiv. 11;
  carried out of the battle, IV. xxiv. 12;
  his death, IV. xxiv. 14;
  succeeded by John as tyrant of the mutineers, IV. xxv. 3

Syllectus, city in Libya, III. xvi. 9;
  captured by Belisarius' men, III. xvi. 11;
  entered by the Roman army, III. xvii. 6

Symmachus, a Roman senator;
  accompanies Germanus to Libya, IV. xvi. 2;
  summoned to Byzantium, IV. xix. 1

Syracuse, city in Sicily, III. xiv. 13;
  its harbour Arethusa, III. xiv. 11;
  Procopius sent thither, III. xiv. 3, 7;
  Belisarius passes the winter there, IV. xiv. 4, 41;
  distance from Caucana, III. xiv. 4

T[edit]


Taenarum, called Caenopolis in Procopius' time;
  promontory of the Peloponnesus, III. xiii. 8;
  Gizeric repulsed from there, III. xxii. 16

Tamougadis, a city at the foot of Mt. Aurasium;
  dismantled by the Moors, IV. xiii. 26, xix. 20

Tattimuth, sent in command of an army to Tripolis, III. x. 23;
  receives support from Belisarius, IV. v. 10

Taulantii, a people of Illyricum, III. ii. 9

Tebesta, city in Libya;
  distance from Carthage, IV. xxi. 19

Terentius, Roman commander of infantry, III. xi. 7, IV. xv. 50

Theoderic, king of the Goths;
  gives his daughter in marriage to the king of the Vandals, and
  makes certain concessions in Sicily, III. viii. 11-13, IV. v. 21;
  becomes hostile to the Vandals, III. ix. 3;
  refrains from attacking them III. ix. 5;
  his death, III. xiv. 6;
  grandfather of Antalaric, _ibid._;
  brother of Amalafrida, III. viii. 11, 13

Theodora, wife of Justinian;
  distributes rewards to Gelimer and others, IV. ix. 13

Theodorus, youngest son of Gizeric;
  his death, III. v. 11

Theodorus, called Cteanus, commander of infantry, III. xi. 7

Theodorus, commander of guards;
  sent to the top of Mt. Bourgaon by Solomon, IV. xii. 17;
  killed by the mutineers, IV. xiv. 35;
  his excellent qualities as a soldier, _ibid._

Theodorus, the Cappadocian;
  sent to Libya with an army, IV. viii. 24;
  sent by Solomon to quiet the mutineers, IV. xiv. 32;
  his enmity against Solomon, IV. xiv. 33;
  elected general by the mutineers, IV. xiv. 34;
  gives Solomon and Martinus dinner and helps them to escape, IV. xiv. 38;
  bidden by Solomon to take care of Carthage, IV. xiv. 41;
  refuses to surrender Carthage to Stotzas, IV. xv. 6;
  made joint ruler of Carthage with Ildiger, IV. xv. 49;
  at the battle of Scalae Veteres, IV. xvii. 6, 19;
  learns of the plot of Maximinus from Asclepiades, IV. xviii. 4

Theodosius I, Roman emperor, father of Arcadius and Honorius, III. i. 2;
  overthrows the tyranny of Maximus, III. iv. 16

Theodosius II, son of Arcadius;
  becomes emperor of the East, III. ii. 33, iii. 6;
  Honorius considers the possibility of finding refuge with him,
    III. ii. 32;
  rears Valentinian, III. iii. 5;
  makes him emperor of the West, III. iii. 8;
  sends an army against the tyrant John, _ibid._;
  his death, III. iv. 39;
  succeeded by Marcian, III. iv. 2, 10;
  father of Eudoxia, III. iv. 15

Thrace, starting point of Alaric's invasion, III. ii. 7;
  the Goths settle there for a time, III. ii. 39;
  home of several Roman commanders, III. xi. 10;
  adjoins "Germania," III. xi. 21;
  royal horse-pastures there, III. xii. 6;
  home of Himerius, IV. xxiii. 3;
  and of Peter, IV. xxviii. 3

Thessalian cape, or chlamys, III. xxv. 7

Theodatus, king of the Goths;
  Belisarius sent against him, IV. xiv. 1

Theudis, king of the Visigoths, IV. iv. 34;
  receives envoys from Gelimer, III. xxiv. 7-16

Tigisis, city in Numidia, IV. x. 21;
  two Phoenician inscriptions there, IV. x. 22;
  its great spring, IV. xiii. 5

Titus, Roman emperor, IV. ix. 2;
  his capture of Jerusalem, IV. ix. 5;
  son of Vespasian, _ibid._

Toumar, place on the summit of Mt. Aurasium, IV. xix. 22;
  besieged by the Romans, IV. xx. 1 ff.;
  scaled by Gezon and captured by Solomon, IV. xx. 1-20

Trajan, Roman emperor, IV. ix. 2

Trasamundus, brother of Gundamundus;
  becomes king of the Vandals, III. viii. 8;
  tries to win over the Christians, III. viii. 9, 10;
  asks the hand of Amalafrida, III. viii. 11;
  becomes a friend of Anastasius, III. viii. 14;
  his death, III. viii. 29

Tricamarum, place in Libya;
  distance from Carthage, IV. ii. 4;
  Vandals defeated there, IV. iii. 1 ff., iv. 35, v. 2, 9

Tripolis, district in Libya;
  distance from Gadira, III. i. 14;
  the Vandals there defeated by Heraclius, III. vi. 9, 11;
  Moors dwelling there, III. viii. 15;
  lost again by the Vandals, III. x. 22-24;
  Gelimer hopeless of recovering it, III. xi. 22;
  Belisarius sends an army thither, IV. v. 10;
  rule of, falls to Sergius, IV. xxi. 1;
  Leuathae come from there with a large army, IV. xxviii. 47

Troy, III. xxi. 4

Tryphon, sent to Libya to assess the taxes, IV. viii. 25

Tuscan Sea, separated from the Adriatic by Gaulus and Melita, III. xiv. 16;
  severity of its storms, IV. iv. 37

Tzazon, brother of Gelimer;
  sent with an army to recover Sardinia, III. xi. 23;
  overthrows and kills Godas in Sardinia, III. xxiv. 1;
  writes to Gelimer, III. xxiv. 2-4;
  receives a letter from him, III. xxv. 10-18;
  thereupon departs for Libya, III. xxv. 19-21;
  meets Gelimer in the Plain of Boulla, III. xxv. 24;
  addresses his troops separately, IV. ii. 23-32;
  commands the centre at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. in. 1, 8, 10, 12;
  his death, IV. iii. 14;
  his head taken to Sardinia by Cyril, IV. v. 2, 4

U[edit]


Uliaris, body-guard of Belisarius, III. xix. 23;
  his stupid action at Decimum, III. xix. 24;
  kills John the Armenian accidentally, IV, iv. 15 ff.;
  takes refuge in a sanctuary, IV. iv. 21;
  spared by Belisarius, IV. iv. 25

Ulitheus, trusted body-guard of Gontharis, IV. xxv. 8;
  bears messages to Antalas, IV. xxv. 8-11, 19;
  at Gontharis' order assassinates Areobindus, IV. xxvi. 32, 33, xxvii. 20;
  marches with Artabanes against Antalas, IV. xxvii. 25 ff.;
  killed by Artasires at the banquet of Gontharis, IV. xxviii. 19 ff.

V[edit]


Valentinian, son of Constantius, reared by Theodosius, III. iii. 5;
  made emperor of the West, III. iii. 8;
  captures John and after brutal abuse kills him, III. iii. 9;
  his viciousness resulting from early training, III. iii. 10, 11;
  loses Libya to the empire, III. iii. 12;
  receives tribute and a hostage from Gizeric, III. iv. 13;
  returns the hostage, III. iv. 14;
  slays Aetius, III. iv. 27;
  outrages the wife of Maximus, III. iv. 16 ff.;
  slain by him, III. iv. 15, 36;
  son of Placidia, III. iii. 10;
  father of Eudocia and Placidia, III. v. 3, vi. 6;
  husband of Eudoxia, III. iv. 15;
  members of his family receive rewards from Justinian and Theodora,
    IV. ix. 13

Valerian, commander of auxiliaries, III. xi. 6;
  sent with Martinus in advance of the African expedition,
    III. xi. 24, 29;
  meets the Roman fleet at Methone, III. xiii. 9;
  on the left wing at the battle of Tricamarum, IV. iii. 4;
  Martinus sent to him in Numidia, IV. xiv. 40;
  summoned to Byzantium, IV. xix. 2

Vandals, a Gothic people, III. ii. 2;
  whence they came into the Roman empire, III. i. 1, iii. 1 ff.;
  a portion of them left behind and lost to memory, III. xxii. 3, 13;
  settle in Spain, III. iii. 2;
  their alliance sought by Boniface, III. iii. 22, 25;
  cross from Spain into Libya, III. iii. 26;
  defeat Boniface in battle, III. iii. 31;
  besiege Hippo Regius, III. iii. 32, 34;
  defeat a second Roman army, III. iii. 35;
  secure possession of Libya, III. xxii. 4;
  send Moors to Sardinia, IV. xiii. 43;
  take the church of St. Cyprian at Carthage from the Christians,
    III. xxi. 19;
  invade Italy and sack Rome, III. v. 1 ff.;
  their numbers together with the Alani, III. v. 18-20;
  absorb all barbarian peoples associated with them except the Moors,
    III. v. 21;
  Leon sends an expedition against them, III. vi. 1 ff.;
  driven out of Sardinia by Marcellianus; III. vi. 8;
  defeated in Tripolis by Heraclius, III. vi. 9;
  lost Mt. Aurasium to the Moors, IV. xiii. 26;
  enter into an "endless peace" with the emperor Zeno, III. vii. 26;
  make war on the Moors, III. viii. 1, 2;
  suffer a great disaster at the hands of the Moors, III. viii. 15-28;
  defeated by the Moors, and become enemies of the Goths, III. ix. 3;
  defeated many times by the Moors, IV. x. 29;
  Justinian prepares an expedition against them, III. x. 1 ff.;
  lose Tripolis, III. x. 22-24;
  and Sardinia, III. x. 25-27;
  letter addressed to them by Justinian, III. xvi. 12-14;
  recover Sardinia, III. xxiv. 1;
  defeated by the Romans at Decimum, III. xviii. 1 ff.;
  greatly feared by the Roman army III. xix. 27;
  collected by Gelimer in the Plain of Boulla, III. xxv. 1 ff.;
  besiege Carthage, IV. i. 3;
  invite the Huns to join them, IV. i. 5;
  defeated by the Romans at Tricamarum, IV. ii. 4 ff.;
  taken to Byzantium by Belisarius, IV. xiv. 17;
  some of them go to the East, while the others escape to Libya,
    IV. xiv. 17-19;
  together with their women, sent out of Libya, IV. xix. 3;
  upon invitation of Stotzas, join the mutineers, IV. xv. 3, 4;
  accumulate great wealth in Africa, IV. iii. 26;
  not trusted by the Libyans, III. xvi. 3;
  their effeminacy as a nation, IV. vi. 5-9;
  their women, as wives of the Romans, incite them to mutiny,
    IV. xiv. 8, 9;
  priests of, incite Romans of Arian faith to mutiny, IV. xiv. 13;
  Vandals' estates, established by Gizeric, III. v. 12;
  Vandals of Justinian, IV. xiv. 17

Veredarii (Latin), royal messengers, III. xvi. 12

Vespasian, Roman emperor, father of Titus, IV. ix. 5

Vigilantia, mother of Prejecta, and sister of Justinian, IV. xxiv. 3

Visigoths, a Gothic people, III. ii. 2;
  their alliance with Arcadius, III. ii. 7;
  the destruction wrought by them in Italy, III. ii. 11-12;
  settle in Spain, III. iii. 26; IV. iv. 34;
  invited to form alliance with the Vandals, III. xxiv. 7

Z[edit]


Zabe, called "First Mauritania";
  subjugated by Solomon, IV. xx. 30

Zacynthus, island off the coast of Greece, III. xiii. 21;
  its inhabitants the victims of Gizeric's atrocity, III. xxii. 15, 17, 18

Zaïdus, commander of Roman infantry, III. xi. 7

Zaunus, son of Paresmanes, and father of Leontius and Rufinus,
    IV. xix. 1, xx. 19

Zeno, emperor of the East;
  husband of Ariadne, and father of Leon the younger, III. vii. 2;
  shares the empire with his infant son, III. vii. 3;
  flees into Isauria, III. vii. 18;
  gathers an army and marches against Basiliscus, III. vii. 20;
  meets Harmatus and receives the army by surrender, III. vii. 21;
  captures Basiliscus and banishes him, III. vii. 22, 24;
  becomes emperor a second time, III. vii. 23;
  kills Harmatus, _ibid._;
  forms a compact with Gizeric, III. vii. 26

Zerboule, fortress on Mt. Aurasium, IV. xix. 19, 20;
  besieged by the Romans, IV. xix. 23-27;
  abandoned by the Moors, IV. xix. 28-32