Hope for Haiti

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Hope for Haiti
by Gerald E. Connolly
Congressional Record: January 13, 2010 (Extensions of Remarks)
From the 2010 Congressional Record, Vol. 156, Pg. E19{{{3}}} via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:cr13ja10-24]

                             HOPE FOR HAITI

                                 ______
                                 

                        HON. GERALD E. CONNOLLY

                              of Virginia

                    in the House of Representatives

                      Wednesday, January 13, 2010

  Mr. CONNOLLY of Virginia. Madam Speaker, I rise today to offer my
deepest sympathy to the people of Haiti as they cope with the aftermath
of yesterday's massive earthquake. The tremendous loss of life and the
untold devastation has left the capital of Port-au-Prince in ruins and
countless families facing the untold horrors of loved ones injured or
killed. This earthquake has shown us nature's worst.
  The world's response to this awful tragedy will demonstrate the best
of human nature. Many people will offer relief and assistance, through
time and money. As we have always done in times of international
disaster, the United States is sending aid to Haiti, including Fairfax
County's Urban Search and Rescue Team 1 (USAR Team 1), which deployed
this morning.
  USAR Team 1 is one of two urban search and rescue teams nationwide
that report to the U.S. Agency for International Development--Office of
U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance for humanitarian deployments. This
highly trained rescue team has deployed to numerous locations across
the globe, saving lives in areas such as Armenia, Indonesia, Romania,
Kenya, Bolivia, Oklahoma City, and the Pentagon, providing critical
lifesaving rescues, especially in building collapse situations.
  In this terrible time of tragedy, Fairfax County's USAR Team 1
represents the best that America has to offer, hope and a commitment
to helping those in need. I commend the men and women of USAR Team 1 on
their heroic efforts, mourn for those who lost their lives and pray for
those awaiting aid.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).