Horace 1.9

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Odes 1.9
by Horace, translated by Wikisource
Alcaic Meter.
Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

You see how [Mount] Soracte stands out white
with deep snow, and the struggling trees can
no longer sustain the burden, and the rivers
are frozen with sharp ice.

Dispel the cold by liberally piling logs on
the fireplace, and draw out more generously,
o Thaliarchus, four-year-old unmixed wine
from the two-handled Sabine jar.

Entrust everything else to the gods; as soon as
they have stilled the winds battling on the heaving
sea, neither the cypress trees nor
the ancient ash trees are shaken.

Leave off asking what tomorrow will bring, and
whatever days fortune will give, count them
as profit, and while you're young don't scorn
sweet love affairs and dances,

so long as crabbed old age is far from
your vigor. Now let the playing field and the
public squares and soft whisperings at nightfall
(the appointed hour) be your pursuits;

now too the sweet laughter of a girl hiding
in a secret corner, her betrayer,
and a pledge snatched from her wrists
or her feebly resisting finger.

Vides ut alta stet niue candidum
Soracte nec iam sustineant onus
     siluae laborantes geluque
     flumina constiterint acuto?

Dissolue frigus ligna super foco
large reponens atque benignius
     deprome quadrimum Sabina,
     o Thaliarche, merum diota.

Permitte diuis cetera, qui simul
strauere uentos aequore feruido
     deproeliantis, nec cupressi
     nec ueteres agitantur orni.

Quid sit futurum cras, fuge quaerere, et
quem fors dierum cumque dabit, lucro
      adpone nec dulcis amores
     sperne, puer, neque tu choreas,

donec uirenti canities abest
morosa. Nunc et Campus et areae
     lenesque sub noctem susurri
      composita repetantur hora,

nunc et latentis proditor intumo
gratus puellae risus ab angulo
     pignusque dereptum lacertis
     aut digito male pertinaci.

9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4

9.5
9.6
9.7
9.8

9.9
9.10
9.11
9.12

9.13
9.14
9.15
9.16

9.17
9.18
9.19
9.20

9.21
9.22
9.23
9.24

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15