Index:American History Told by Contemporaries, v2.djvu

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American History Told by Contemporaries, v2.djvu

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Contents

PART I PRACTICAL INTRODUCTION
FOR TEACHERS, PUPILS, STUDENTS, AND LIBRARIES


CHAPTER I — THE SOURCES AND HOW TO FIND THEM
PAGE
1. What are Sources? 1
2. Educative Value of Sources 3
3. Classification of Sources on the Colonies and the Revolution 4
4. Libraries of Sources in American History 10
5. Reprints of Collected Sources on the Colonies and the Revolution 11
6. Select Library of Sources on Colonization 14

CHAPTER II — USE OF SOURCES
7. How to find Sources on the Colonies and the Revolution 22
8. Use of Sources by Teachers 24
9. Use of Sources by Pupils 25
10. Use of Sources by Students and Investigators 27
11. Use of Sources by Readers 28
12. Use of Sources by Libraries 29
13. Caution in using Sources 30
14. Use of Secondary Works 32
15. Select List of Secondary Works on the Eighteenth Century and the Revolution 32

PART II

THE SEPARATE COLONIES

CHAPTER III — NEW ENGLAND
16. Reverend Deodat Lawson:
 Salem Witches, 1692
35
17. Clerk Ezekiel Cheever:
 Witches' Testimony, 1692
40
18. Chief Justice Samuel Sewall:
 Guilt Contracted by the Witch Judges, 1697
48
19. Governor Samuel Cranston:
  An Explanation by Rhode Island, 1699
49
20. Daniel Neal:
  An Historical Sketch of New England, 1720
52
21. Lieutenant-Governor John Wentworth:
  The Condition of New Hampshire, 1731
55
22. Roger Wolcott:
  Affairs in Connecticut, 1740-1758
58
23. Captain Francis Goelet:
 "Boston the Metropolis of North America,"1750
61
24. John Adams:
 "Overweening Prejudice in Favor of New England," 1775
63

CHAPTER IV — MIDDLE COLONIES
25. Gabriel Thomas:
  Pennsylvania, the Poor Man's Paradise, 1698
65
26. Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations:
  Proposal to Unite the two Jerseys, 1701
68
27. Secretary James Logan:
  The Separation of Delaware, 1703
72
28. "Richard Castelman, Gent.":
  Philadelphia, "a Noble, Large, and Populous City," 1710
74
29. John Conrad Wyser and other Palatines:
  The Settlement of the Palatine Germans in New York, 1709-1720
77
30. His Majesty's Council in New Jersey:
  "Concerning the Riot & Insurrections in New Jersey," 1744-1748
80
31. Robert Proud:
  Politics in Pennsylvania, 1740-1754
85
32. Reverend Andrew Burnaby:
  "New-York City," 1760
87

CHAPTER V — SOUTHERN COLONIES
33. Robert Beverly:
  Andros's and Nicholson's Administrations, 1690-1705
90
34. Edward Randolph:
  Report of an Investigating Agent in Carolina, 1699
94
35. Eliza Lucas:
  A South Carolina Settlement, 1742
99
36. Governor Horatio Sharpe:
  Routine in Maryland, 1754
100
37. Reverend James Maury:
  The Parson's Opinion of "the Parson's Cause," 1763
103
38. Commissioners of Maryland and Pennsylvania:
  The Running of Mason and Dixon's Line, 1763-1767
107

CHAPTER VI — GEORGIA
39. General James Edward Oglethorpe:
  "Designs of the Trustees for Establishing the Colony of Georgia," 1733
110
40. Reverend Johann Martin Bolzius:
  The Coming of the Salzburg Germans, 1734
114
41. Reverend Samuel Quincy:
  A New England Man in Georgia 1735
116
42. Freeholders and the Georgia Trustees:
  The Question of Slavery in Georgia, 1738-1739
118
43. Secretary Colonel William Stephens:
  Mr. Whitefield's Orphan-House, 1740
122
44. Edmund Burke:
  Need of Relieving Georgia, 1749
124

PART III

COLONIAL GOVERNMENT

CHAPTER VII — PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH CONTROL

45. Parliament of England:
  Extracts from a Navigation Act, 1696
127
46. King William Third:
  Creation of the Board of Trade, 1696
129
47. John Wise:
  Englishmen Hate an Arbitrary Power, 1710
131
48. "Agent Jeremiah Dummer":
  Defence of the New-England Charters, 1721
133
49. Governor Sir William Keith:
  A Short Discourse on the Present State of the Colonies, 1728
138
50. Doctor William Douglass:
  Various Kinds of Colonial Government, 1747
141
51. Monsieur Charles de Secondat de Montesquieu:
  A French Publicist's View of the British Constitution, 1748
144
52. Edmund Burke:
  "The Law in all our Provinces," 1757
149
53. Late Governor Thomas Pownall:
  The Effect of Royal Instructions, 1764
150

CHAPTER VIII — THE COLONIAL GOVERNOR
54. Governor William Cosby:
  A Governor's Plea for Patronage, 1732
153
55. Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations:
  The Commission and Instructions of a Governor, 1738
154
56. Secretary George Clarke, Jr.:
  One Thousand Pounds for a Governorship, 1740
161
57. Governor George Clinton:
  A Governor's Perquisites, 1743-1746
162
58. Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations:
  Recommendation for the Removal of a Governor, 1762
165
59. Late Governor Thomas Pownall:
  The Governor of Dispute over Salaries 1764
166
60. Secretary the Earl of Dartmouth:
  A Reprimand to a Colonial Governor, 1772
169

CHAPTER IX — COLONIAL ASSEMBLIES
61. Charles Pettit:
  A Colonial Election, 1764
171
62. General Assembly of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations:
  Proceedings of a Colonial Legislature, 1723
173
63. Governor Gabriel Johnston:
  The Dissolution of an Assembly, 1737
174
64. Secretary Charles Read:
  Minutes of a Colonial Council, 1752
175
65. Governor Lewis Morris:
  A Determined Veto Message, 1742
179
66. Late Governor Thomas Pownall:
  How to Avoid a Governor's Veto, 1764
182
67. Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations:
  Disallowance of a Colonial Bill, 1770
183
68. Agent Benjamin Franklin:
  Disputes over the Agency, 1771
184

CHAPTER X — COLONIAL COURTS
69. "A Swiss Gentleman":
  How Juries were Summoned, 1710
188
70. Lieutenant-Governor Robert Dinwiddie:
  Charge to a Grand Jury, 1753
189
71. Clerk of the Court of Perquimans:
  Records of a Precinct Court, 1694
191
72. John Peter Zenger:
  A Prosecution for Criticising Government, 1734
192
73. Edward Southwell:
  An Appeal Case in the Privy Council, 1728
200
74. Late Governor Thomas Pownall:
  Defects of Colonial Judicature, 1764
202

CHAPTER XI — COLONIAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT
75. Clerk Ephraim Herman:
  The Business of a County Court, 1681
205
76. Mayor, Recorder, Aldermen, and Common Council of Albany:
  Records of a City Government, 1700
208
77. Vestry of St. Paul's Parish, Chowan Precinct:
  Records of a Vestry Meeting, 1702
212
78. Clerk Captain Richard Waterman:
  Proceedings of a Town-Meeting, 1721
214
79. John Adams:
  The Dignity of a Selectman, 1763-1766
220


PART IV

COLONIAL LIFE

CHAPTER XII — THE LIFE OF THE PEOPLE
80. Madam Sarah Kemble Knight:
  A Lady's Travel in New England, 1704
224
81. Benjamin Franklin
  "A Man Diligent in his Calling,"
229
82. Colonel William Byrd:
  Society in Virginia, 1732
235
83. Eliza Lucas:
  A Modern Woman, 1741-1742
238
84. Captain Francis Goelet:
  Roisterers in Boston, 1750
240

CHAPTER XIII — COMMERCE AND CURRENCY
85. Governor the Earl of Bellomont:
  Official Protection of Pirates, 1698
244
86. Anonymous:
  A Plea for Protective Duties, 1704
247
87. Collector Archibald Kennedy:
  A Case of Smuggling, 1739
249
88. Governor William Burnet:
  A Defence of Paper Money, 1724
251
89. Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations:
  Paper Money Forbidden, 1740
254

CHAPTER XIV — INTELLECTUAL LIFE
90. Reverend President Thomas Clap:
  "The History of Yale-College," 1698-1717
255
91. Reverend Mather Byles:
  "A poetical Lamentation, occasioned by the Death of His late Majesty' King George the First," 1727
 
258
92. Reverend Cotton Mather:
  "Some Account of the Earthquake that shook New-England," 1727
261
93. Reverend Doctor Increase Mather:
  A Protest against a Wicked Newspaper, 1722
262
94. Benjamin Franklin:
  The People's Favorite Literature, 1744
263
95. Nathaniel Ames:
  A Skit on College Examinations, 1784
266
96. Francis Hopkinson:
  A Skit on College Examinations, 1784
272

CHAPTER XV — RELIGIOUS LIFE
97. Lewis Morris:
  "The State of Religion in the Jerseys," 1700
276
98. Thomas Story:
  A Quaker's Arguments with Orthodox Ministers, 1704
279
99. Reverend John Wesley:
  An Evangelist in Georgia, 1736-1737
283
100. Governor Jonathan Belcher:
  A Good Man's Letter, 1752
287
101. Archbishop Thomas Secker:
  A Plan for American Bishops, 1758
289

CHAPTER XVI — SLAVERY AND SERVITUDE
102. Monthly Meeting of the Germantown Quakers:
  The First Vote against Slavery, 1688
291
103. "Hon'ble Judge Sewall in New England":
  The Selling of Joseph, 1700
293
104. Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations:
  A Slave Act Disallowed, 1709
297
105. Owners and Masters:
  All Sorts of Runaways, 1741-1750
298
106. John Woolman:
  Exercise of a Quaker Abolitionist's Mind, 1757
302
107. William Eddis:
  The Wretchedness of White Servants, 1770
308
108. George Washington:
  "Desire of Importing Palatines," 1774
310


PART V

INTERCOLONIAL, 1689-1764


CHAPTER XVII — THE FRENCH COLONIES
109. Bénard de la Harpe:
  Foundation of Louisiana, 1700-1703
312
110. Lieutenant-Governor Alexander Spotswood:
  Danger from the French Mississippi Settlements, 1718
316
111. Surveyor-General Cadwallader Colden:
  The French and the Fur Trade, 1724
320
112. Professor Peter Kalm:
  The Government of Canada, 1749
324

CHAPTER XVIII — THE INDIANS
113. James Adair:
  The Life of an Indian Trader, 1735-1775
327
114. Professor Peter Kalm:
  Small Pox and Brandy among the Indians, 1749
330
115. Sir William Johnson:
  A Flowery Speech to the Six Nations, 1753
331
116. Captain Jonathan Carver:
  "A Concise Character of the Indians," 1767
334

CHAPTER XIX — INTERCOLONIAL WARS
117. Comptroller-General de Monseignat:
  The Taking of Schenectady, 1690
337
118. Colonel Miles Brewton and others:
  The Evil Deeds of the Spaniards, 1702-1740
340
119. Anonymous:
  A Ballad of Pigwacket
344
120. Captain Samuel Curwen:
  The Louisburg Expedition, 1745
346
121. Newspaper:
  A Spanish Privateer in the Delaware, 1748
349

CHAPTER XX — THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR
122. Professor Peter Kalm:
  The Question of Colonial Independence, 1748
352
123. Royal Ministerial Minutes:
  The French Title to the Beautiful River, 1752
354
124. Secretary the Earl of Holdernesse:
  Royal Orders to Resist the French, 1753
356
125. Chief Justice Stephen Hopkins:
  The Albany Plan of Union, 1754
357
126. Colonel John Winslow:
  Deportation of the Acadians, 1755
360
127. Anonymous:
  A French Account of Braddock's Defeat, 1755
365
128. Secretary William Pitt:
  "The Empire is no more," 1757
367
129. Captain John Knox:
  The Fall of Quebec, 1759
369


PART VI

CAUSES OF THE REVOLUTION


CHAPTER XXI — NEW CONDITIONS OF ENGLISH CONTROL
130. James Earl of Waldegrave:
  The Character of George Third, 1758
373
131. James Otis:
  Arguments on Writs of Assistance, 1761
374
132. John Wilkes:
  Opposition to Arbitrary Power, 1763
378
133. Commissioner Benjamin Franklin:
  Grenville's Scheme of Taxation, 1763-1764
381

CHAPTER XXII — THE WEST
134. John Filson:
  "The Adventures of Col. Daniel Boon," 1769-1775
383
135. Governor the Earl of Dunmore:
  Cold Water on an Ohio Colony, 1770
386
136. Reverend Joseph Doddridge:
  The Settlement of the Western Country, 1772-1774
387
137. François Jean, Marquis de Chastellux:
  How the Frontiers were Settled, 1780
392

CHAPTER XXIII — THE STAMP ACT CONTROVERSY
138. Martin Howard:
  A Colonist's Defence of Taxation, 1765
394
139. Josiah Quincy, Jr. :
  The Hutchinson Riot, 1765
397
140. Town-Meeting of Cambridge:
  A Spirited Remonstrance, 1765
401
141. Stamp Act Congress:
  "Declarations of the Rights and Grievances of the Colonists," 1765
402
142. William Pitt, Later Earl of Chatham:
  An Englishman's Protest against Taxation, 1766
404
143. Benjamin Franklin and a Committee of the House of Commons:
  The State of the Colonies, 1766
407
144. Secretary Henry Seymour Conway:
  The Repeal of the Stamp Act, 1766
411

CHAPTER XXIV — THE REVENUE CONTROVERSY
145. Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford:
  Townshend's Revenue Scheme, 1767
413
146. Agent Dennis de Berdt:
  Complaint against the Acts of Trade, 1767
415
147. Reverend Charles Chauncy:
  Fears of Episcopacy, 1767
418
148. Chief Justice Thomas Hutchinson:
  Troops and Sons of Liberty in Boston, 1768
420
149. John Dickson:
  The Pennsylvania Farmer's Remedy, 1768
423
150. Judge Richard Henderson:
  Riot of the North Carolina Regulators, 1770
426
151. John Tudor:
  An Eye-Witness of the Boston Massacre, 1770
429
152. John Andrews:
  The Boston Tea-Party, 1773
431

CHAPTER XXV — THE ISSUES OF COERCION
153. Delegate John Adams:
  The First Continental Congress, 1774
434
154. Governor the Earl of Dunmore:
  Enforcement of the Association, 1774
439
155. Second Continental Congress:
  The Necessity of Self-Defence, 1775
442
156. Doctor Samuel Johnson:
  A Diatribe on the American Arguments, 1775
445
157. Chief Justice William Henry Drayton:
  The Tyranny of King George Third, 1776
449
158. King George Third:
  An Obstinate Guelph, 1777-1778
451


PART VII

CONDITIONS OF THE REVOLUTION


CHAPTER XXVI — THE PATRIOTS
159. Thomas Paine:
  "Liberty Tree," 1775
454
160. Reverend Stephen Williams:
  A Troublous Year in a Country Village, 1776
455
161. "Plain English":
  Reign of King Mob, 1775
458
162. Colonel Alexander Scammell:
  A Soldier's Love-Letter, 1777
461
163. Benjamin Huntington:
  Regulation of Prices, 1777
463
164. Reverend Timothy Dwight:
 "Columbia, Columbia to Glory Arise," 1777
465
165. Mrs. Esther Reed and General George Washington:
  Woman's Work for the Soldiers, 1780
467

CHAPTER XXVII — THE LOYALISTS
166. R.H. and a Committee of Correspondence:
  A Tory's Recantation, 1775
470
167. Reverend Jonathan Odell:
  The Arrest of a Loyalist Parson, 1776
472
168. "A Whig":
  Vengeance on the Tories! 1779
474
169. Judge Samuel Curwen:
  The Lot of the Refugee, 1775-1779
477

CHAPTER XXVIII — THE AMERICAN FORCES
170. Captain Alexander Graydon:
  The Recruiting Service, 1776
481
171. Anonymous:
  A Brave Man's Death, 1776
484
172. General Marie Paul Joseph, Marquis de Lafayette:
  Arrival of a French Volunteer, 1777
485
173. Colonel Alexander Hamilton:
  "Battalions of Negroes," 1779
488
174. General George Washington:
  The Inconveniences of Militia, 1780
490
175. Surgeon James Thacher:
  Military Punishments, 1780
493
176. François Jean, Marquis de Chastellux:
  At Washington's Headquarters, 1780
495
177. Doctor Solomon Drowne:
  Life on a Privateer, 1780
497

CHAPTER XXIX — THE BRITISH FORCES
178. Honoré Gabriel Riquetti, Count de Mirabeau:
  "Appeal to the Hessians sold by their Princes," 1776
500
179. Captain Georg Pausch:
  Army Life, 1776-1777
504
180. Commissary-General Elias Boudinot:
  An Investigation of British Military Prisons, 1778
508
181. Lieutenant-Colonel John Graves Simcoe:
  A Loyalist Corps, 1777
511
182. Joseph Stansbury:
  "The Lords of Main," 1780
514
183. Major John André:
  The Experiences of a British Spy, 1780
515


PART VIII

PROGRESS OF THE REVOLUTION


CHAPTER XXX — UNION AND INDEPENDENCE
184. Clerk Gabriel Du Vall:
  Proceedings of a Revolutionary Convention, 1775
519
185. Delegate Richard Smith:
  The Activities of the Continental Congress, 1775
525
186. Thomas Paine:
  A Call for Independence, 1776
530
187. Chairman Meshech Weare, Secretary E. Thompson, and others:
  Difficulties in Framing a State Constitution, 1776
534
188. Delegate Thomas Paine:
  Drafting of the Declaration of Independence, 1776
537
189. Delegate John Adams:
  Difficulties in Framing Articles of Confederation, 1776
539
190. Colonel Alexander Hamilton:
  Falling-off of the Character of Congress, 1778
543

CHAPTER XXXI — FIRST STAGE OF THE WAR, 1775-1778
191. Salem Gazette and London Gazette:
  Conflicting Accounts of Lexington and Concord, 1775
546
192. Mrs. Abigail Adams:
  A Woman at the Front, 1175-1776
550
193. General George Clinton:
  Abandonment of New York, 1776
554
194. Robert Morris:
  The Foundation of the Navy, 1776
556
195. General George Washington:
 "The Game is pretty near up," 1776
559
196. Francis Hopkinson:
 "The Battle of the Kegs," 1777
562
197. Frederika Charlotte Louise, Baroness von Riedesel:
  The Surrender of Burgoyne, 1777
565
198. Doctor Albigence Waldo:
  Life at Valley Forge, 1777-1778
568

CHAPTER XXXII — FRENCH ALLIANCE, 1778-1779
199. Commissioner Benjamin Franklin:
  A Treaty with France, 1778
574
200. Colonel John Trumbull:
  A Dashing Young Officer in the Field, 1778
575
201. Colonel George Rogers Clark:
  The Conquest of the Illinois Country, 1779
579
202. General Frederick Williams, Baron von Steuben:
  A Foreign Officer well Received, 1778-1779
582
203. Governor Patrick Henry :
  A Warning against Conciliation, 1778
586
204. Captain John Paul Jones:
  A Desperate Sea-Flight, 1779
587

CHAPTER XXXIII — CRISIS IN DOMESTIC AFFAIRS, 1779-1782
205. Assembly of Maryland:
  The Confederation Incomplete, 1779
591
206. General George Washington:
  Revolutionary Finance, 1781
594
207. Duane, Sharpe, and Wolcott:
  The State of the National Debt, 1781
598
208. William Pynchon:
  Not worth a Continental, 1781
601
209. Pennsylvania Packet:
  The Federal Arch Completed, 1781
604
210. Superintendent Robert Morris:
  The Bank of North America, 1782
605

CHAPTER XXXIV — THE END OF THE WAR, 1780-1781
211. James Madison:
  A Review of the War, 1780-1781
606
212. General Nathanael Greene:
  Affairs in the South, 1780-1781
609
213. Anonymous:
  Exploits of De Grasse in the West Indies, 1781
612
214. Lieutenant-General Charles, Marquis Cornwallis:
  The Capitulation of Yorktown, 1781
615

CHAPTER XXXV — PEACE
215. King George Third:
  '"'The Sudden Change of Sentiments," 1781-1782
619
216. Charles Gravier, Count de Vergennes:
  A Protest against the Breach of the Instructions of Congress, 1782
621
217. Adams, Franklin, Jay, and Laurens:
  Explanation of the Peace of 1782, 1782
623
218. General William Heath:
  Foundation of the Society of the Cincinnati, 1783
626
219. Doctor William Gordon:
  The Closing Scene, 1783
627
220. Doctor David Ramsay:
  "The Advantage and Disadvantage of the Revolution," 1783
629