John Brown's Body

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John Brown's Body
"John Brown's Body" (originally known as "John Brown's Song") is a famous Union marching song of the American Civil War. It was for many years generally assumed to have been created as a tribute to the abolitionist acts of John Brown, a claim now disputed by some historians. The song was found offensive by Major General George B. McClellan while he was in command of the Army of the Potomac, and he tried to ban it, to little effect (Sears, Stephen, Landscape Turned Red).
Excerpted from John Brown's Body on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave;
John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave;
John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave;
His soul's marching on!

Chorus:

Glory, halle—hallelujah! Glory, halle—hallelujah!
Glory, halle—hallelujah! his soul's marching on!

He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord!
He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord!
He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord!
His soul's marching on!

John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back!
John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back!
John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back!
His soul's marching on!

His pet lambs will meet him on the way;
His pet lambs will meet him on the way;
His pet lambs will meet him on the way;
They go marching on!

They will hang Jeff. Davis to a sour apple tree!
They will hang Jeff. Davis to a sour apple tree!
They will hang Jeff. Davis to a sour apple tree!
As they march along!

Now, three rousing cheers for the Union;
Now, three rousing cheers for the Union;
Now, three rousing cheers for the Union;
As we are marching on!