Laudabiliter

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Laudabiliter
by Adrian IV

Literal translation by Laurence Ginnell[1][2][edit]

Adrian, Bishop, servant of the servants of God, to his dearest son in Christ, the illustrious King of the English, greeting and apostolical benediction.

Your Majesty quite laudably and profitably considers how to extend the glory of your name on earth and increase the reward of eternal happiness in Heaven, when, as a Catholic Prince, you propose to extend the limits of the Church, to announce the truth of the Christian faith to ignorant and barbarous nations, and to root out the weeds of vice from the field of the Lord ; and the more effectually to accomplish this you implore the counsel and favour of the Apostolic See. In which matter we are confident that the higher your aim, and the greater the discretion with which you proceed, the happier, with God's help, will be your success; because those things that originate in the ardour of faith and the love of religion are always wont to arrive at a good issue and end.

Certainly Hibernia and all the islands upon which Christ the Sun of Justice has shone, and which have accepted the doctrines of the Christian faith, of right belong, as your Highness doth acknowledge, to blessed Peter and the Holy Roman Church. Wherefore we the more willingly sow in them a faithful plantation and a seed pleasing to God, in as much as we know by internal examination that it will be strictly required of us. You have signified to us, dearest son in Christ, that you desire to enter the island of Hibernia to subject that people to laws, and to root out therefrom the weeds of vice; also that you desire to pay from every house an annual pension ,of one penny to blessed Peter, and to preserve ,the rights of the churches of that land inviolate and whole.

We, therefore, regarding with due favour your pious and laudable desire, and according a gracious assent to your petition, deem it pleasing and acceptable that, for the purpose of extending the limits of the Church, checking the torrent of wickedness, reforming evil manners, sowing seeds of virtue, and increasing the Christian religion, you should enter that island and execute whatever shall be conducive to the honour of God and the salvation of that land. And let the people of that land receive you honourably and reverence you as lord, the rights of the churches remaining indisputably inviolate and whole, and the annual pension of one penny from every house being reserved to blessed Peter and the Holy Roman Church.

If, therefore, you will carry to completion what with a mind so disposed you have conceived, study to form that people to good morals, and, as well by yourself as by those whom you shall find qualified for the purpose by faith, word, and conduct, so act that the Church may be adorned, that the religion of the Christian faith may be planted and may increase; and let all that concerns the honour of God and the salvation of souls be ordered in such manner that you may deserve to obtain from God a plentiful, everlasting reward, and on earth succeed in acquiring a name glorious for ages.

Translation from Latin by James F. Dimock[3][edit]

Adrian, bishop, servant of the servants of God, to his most dearly beloved son in Christ, the illustrious king of the English, greeting and apostolical blessing.

Laudably and profitably doth your Majesty consider how you may best extend the glory of your name on earth and lay up for yourself an eternal reward in heaven, when, as becomes a Catholic prince, you labour to extend the borders of the Church, to teach the truths of the Christian faith to a rude and unlettered people, and to root out the weeds of vice from the field of the Lord; and to accomplish your design more effectually you crave the advice and assistance of the Apostolic See, and in so doing we are persuaded that the higher are your aims, and the more discreet your proceedings, the greater, under God, will be your success; because, whatever has its origin in ardent faith and in love of religion, always has a prosperous end and issue.

Certainly it is beyond a doubt, as your Highness acknowledgeth, that Ireland and all the other islands, on which the Gospel of Christ hath dawned and which have received the knowledge of the Christian faith, belong of right to St Peter and the holy Roman Church. Wherefore we are the more desirous to sow in them the acceptable seed of God's word, because we know that it will be strictly required of us hereafter. You have signified to us, our well-beloved son in Christ, that you propose to enter the island of Ireland in order to subdue the people and make them obedient to laws, and to root out from among them the weeds of sin; and that you are willing to yield and pay yearly from every house the pension of one penny to St Peter, and to keep and preserve the rights of the churches in that land whole and inviolate.

We, therefore, regarding your pious and laudable design with due favour, and graciously assenting to your petition, do hereby declare our will and pleasure, that, for the purpose of enlarging the borders of the Church, setting bounds to the progress of wickedness, reforming evil manners, planting virtue, and increasing the Christian religion, you do enter and take possession of that island, and execute therein whatsoever shall be for God's honour and the welfare of the same. And, further, we do also strictly charge and require that the people of that land shall accept you with all honour, and dutifully obey you, as their liege lord, saving only the rights of the churches, which we will have inviolably preserved; and reserving to St Peter and the holy Roman Church the yearly pension of one penny from each house.

If, therefore, you bring your purpose to good effect, let it be your study to improve the habits of that people, and take such orders by yourself, or by others whom you shall think fitting, for their lives, manners and conversation, that the Church there may be adorned by them, the Christian faith be planted and increased, and all that concerns the honour of God and the salvation of souls be ordered by you in like manner; so that you may receive at God's hands the blessed reward of everlasting life, and may obtain on earth a glorious name in ages to come.

Translation from Latin by Cardinal Patrick Francis Moran[4][5][6][edit]

Adrian, Bishop, servant of the servants of God. to our most dear Son in Christ, the illustrious King of the English, greeting and the Apostolical Benediction.

The thoughts of Your Highness are laudably and profitably directed to the greater glory of your name on earth and to the increase of the reward of eternal happiness in heaven, when as a Catholic Prince you propose to yourself to ex tend the borders of the Church, to announce the truths of Christian Faith to ignorant and barbarous nations, and to root out the weeds of wickedness from the field of the Lord; and the more effectually to accomplish this, you implore the counsel and favor of the Apostolic See. In which matter we feel assured that the higher your aims are, and the more discreet your proceedings, the happier, with God's aid, will be the result; because those undertakings that proceed from the ardor of faith and the love of religion are sure always to have a prosperous end and issue.

It is beyond all doubt, as your Highness also doth acknowledge, that Ireland, and all the is lands upon which Christ the Sun of Justice has shone, and which have received the knowledge of the Christian faith, are subject to the authority of St. Peter and of the most Holy Roman Church. Wherefore we are the more desirous to sow in them an acceptable seed and a plantation pleasing unto God, because we know that a most rigorous account of them shall be required of us hereafter.

Now, most dear Son in Christ, you have signified to us that you propose to enter the island of Ireland to establish the observance of law among its people, and to eradicate the weeds of vice; and that you are willing to pay from every house one penny as an annual tribute to St. Peter, and to preserve the rights of the churches of that land, whole and inviolate. We, therefore, receiving with due favor your pious and laudable desires, and graciously granting our consent to your petition, declare that it is pleasing and acceptable to us, that for the purpose of enlarging the limits of the Church, setting bounds to the torrent of vice, reforming evil manners, planting the seeds of virtue and increasing Christian faith, you should enter that island and carry into effect those things which belong to the service of God and to the salvation of that people; and that the people of that land should honorably receive and reverence you as Lord; the rights of the churches being preserved untouched and entire, and reserving the annual tribute of one penny from every house to St. Peter and the most Holy Roman Church.

If, therefore, you resolve to carry these designs into execution, let it be your study to form that people to good morals, and take such orders both by yourself and by those whom you shall find qualified in faith, in words, and in conduct, that the Church there may be adorned, and the practices of Christian faith be planted and increased; and let all that tends to the glory of God and the salvation of souls be so ordered by you that you may deserve to obtain from God an increase of everlasting reward, and may secure on earth a glorious name throughout all time. Given at Rome, &c.

Translation from Latin by Migne [7][8][edit]

Adrian, Bishop, servant of the servants of God, to his dear son in Christ, the illustrious King of England, sends greeting and Apostolic benediction.

Your Highness is filled with a laudable and fruitful desire to extend your glorious name in this world, and to increase your reward of immortal happiness in heaven, whilst, as a good Catholic prince, you set yourself to extend the bounds of the Church, to declare the Christian Faith to ignorant and barbarous peoples, and to extirpate the nurseries of immorality from the estate of the Lord ; and the more effectively to put this design in execution, you have come for advice and assistance to the Holy See. And in this undertaking we are confident that the shrewder the judgment and the greater the discretion with which you proceed, the happier the success you will with God's help have ; because those things always come to a good issue and end which have taken their origin from enthusiasm for the faith and love of religion.

Surely there is no doubt—what your Highness also admits—that Ireland, and all other islands o'er which Christ the sun of righteousness has shined, and which have accepted the lessons of the Christian faith, do of right belong to the Blessed Peter and the Holy Church of Rome. And the more clearly our own examination shows us the need, the more readily do we introduce among them the planting of faith, a seed so pleasing to God.

Since you have advised us, dearest son in Christ, of your intended expedition into Ireland, to subject the island to just laws and to root out thence the hotbeds of vice, and you promise to make from every house a yearly payment to S. Peter of one penny, and to maintain the rights of the Church without the least detriment or diminution, we, therefore, being willing to assist you in this pious and laudable desire with fitting favour, and benignantly consenting to your petition, hold it a pleasing and acceptable thing that you make a descent on that island, to enlarge the bounds of the Church, to check the career of profligacy, to reform morality, and to promote virtue with a view to the increase of the Christian religion ; and that you carry out what shall have regard to the honour of God and the salvation of that land, and that the people of that land receive you honourably and respect you as their sovereign lord—provided always that the rights of the Church are preserved undiminished and entire, and one penny be duly paid out of every house to the Blessed Peter and the Holy Roman Church.

If therefore you put your design in execution, be careful to reform the manners of the people, and so act, both in your own person and in the persons of those whom you employ, having seen them to be worthy in faith and language and life, that the Church of God may be beautified there and the Christian religion may be planted and grow, and that all things tending to the honour of God and the salvation of souls may be ordered in such manner by your efforts as may entitle you to obtain a large eternal reward in heaven and enable you to win a glorious name on earth for all ages.

Translation from Latin by J. Morrison Davidson [9][10][edit]

Hadrian the Bishop, Servant of Servants of God, to his very dear son in Christ, the illustrious King of the English, health and apostolic benediction.

Your magnificence praiseworthily and profitably takes thought how to increase a glorious name on earth, and how to lay up a reward of everlasting happiness in heaven; forasmuch as you intend, like a Catholic prince, to enlarge the bounds of the Church, to declare the truth to unlearned and rude peoples, and to uproot the seedlings of vice from the Lord's field. The better to attain that end, you have asked counsel and favour of the apostolic see. In which action we are sure that, with God's help, you will make happy progress, in proportion to the high design and great discretion of your proceedings, inasmuch as undertakings which grow out of ardour for the faith and love of religion are accustomed always to have a good end and upshot.

There is no doubt, and your nobility acknowledges, that Ireland, and all islands upon which Christ, the sun of justice, has shone, and which have received the teachings of the Christian faith, rightfully belong to the blessed Peter and the most holy Roman Church. We have, therefore, the more willingly made a plantation among them, and inserted a bud pleasing to God, in that we foresee that it will require a careful internal watch at our hands. However, you have signified to us, my dear son in Christ, that you wish to enter the island of Ireland, in order to reduce that people to law, and to uproot the seedlings of vice there, and to make a yearly payment of a denarius to the Blessed Peter out of each house, and to preserve the rights of the churches of that land whole and undiminished.

We, therefore, seconding your pious and laudable desire with suitable favour, and giving a kindly assent to your petition, do hold it for a thing good and acceptable that you should enter that island for the extension of the Church's borders, for the correction of manners, for the propagation of virtue, and for increase of the Christian religion, and that you should perform that which you intend for the honour of God and for the salvation of that land, and let the people of that land receive you honourably, and venerate you as their lord; the ecclesiastical law remaining whole and untouched, and an annual payment of one denarius being reserved to the blessed Peter and to the most holy Roman Church.

But if you shall complete the work which you have conceived in your mind, study to mould that race to good morals, and exert yourself personally and by such of your agents as you shall find fit in faith, word and living, to honour the Church there, and to plant and increase the Christian faith, and strive to ordain what is for the honour of God and the safety of souls, in such a manner that you may deserve at God's hands a heap of everlasting treasure, and on earth gain a glorious name for ages yet to come. Given at Rome, &c., &c."

Literal translation of the old Latin text by Stephen J McCormick [11][edit]

Adrian, Bishop, servant of the servants of God. to our most dear Son in Christ, the illustrious King of the English, greeting and the Apostolical Benediction.

The thoughts of Your Highness are laudably and profitably directed to the greater glory of your name on earth and to the increase of the reward of eternal happiness in heaven, when as a Catholic Prince you propose to yourself to extend the borders of the Church, to announce the truths of Christian Faith to ignorant and barbarous nations, and to root out the weeds of wickedness from the field of the Lord; and the more effectually to accomplish this, you implore the counsel and favor of the Apostolic See. In which matter we feel assured that the higher your aims are, and the more discreet your proceedings, the happier, with God s aid, will be the result; because those undertakings that proceed from the ardor of faith and the love of religion are sure always to have a prosperous end and issue.

It is beyond all doubt, as your Highness also doth acknowledge, that Ireland, and all the is lands upon which Christ the Sun of Justice has shone, and which have received the knowledge of the Christian faith, are subject to the authority of St. Peter and of the most Holy Roman Church. Wherefore we are the more desirous to sow in them an acceptable seed and a plantation pleasing unto God, because we know that a most rigorous account of them shall be required of us hereafter.

Now, most dear Son in Christ, you have signified to us that you propose to enter the island of Ireland to establish the observance of law among its people, and to eradicate the weeds of vice; and that you are willing to pay from every house one penny as an annual tribute to St. Peter, and to preserve the rights of the churches of that land, whole and inviolate. We, therefore, receiving with due favor your pious and laudable desires, and graciously granting our consent to your petition, declare that it is pleasing and acceptable to us, that for the purpose of enlarging the limits of the Church, setting bounds to the torrent of vice, reforming evil manners, planting the seeds of virtue and increasing Christian faith, you should enter that island and carry into effect those things which belong to the service of God and to the salvation of that people; and that the people of that land should honorably receive and reverence you as Lord; the rights of the churches being preserved untouched and entire, and reserving the annual tribute of one penny from every house to So. Peter and the most Holy Roman Church.

If, therefore, you resolve to carry these designs into execution, let it be your study to form that people to good morals, and take such orders both by yourself and by those whom you shall find qualified in faith, in words, and in conduct, that the Church there may be adorned, and the practices of Christian faith be planted and increased; and let all that tends to the glory of God and the salvation of souls be so ordered by you that you may deserve to obtain from God an increase of everlasting reward, and may secure on earth a glorious name throughout all time. Given at Rome, &c.

From the Historical works of Giraldus Cambrensis by Thomas Wright [12][edit]

Adrian the bishop, the servant of the servants of God, to his most dearly beloved son in Christ, the illustrious king of England, sendeth greeting, with the apostolical benediction.

Your majesty (tua magnificentia) laudably and profitably considers how you may best promote your glory on earth, and lay up for yourself an eternal reward in heaven, when, as becomes a catholic prince, you labour to extend the borders of the church, to teach the truths of the Christian faith to a rude and unlettered people, and to root out the weeds of wickedness from the field of the Lord; for this purpose you crave the advice and assistance of the apostolic see, and in so doing we are persuaded that the higher are your aims, and the more discreet your proceedings, the greater, under God, will be your success. For those who begin with zeal for the faith, and love for religion, may always have the best hopes of bringing their undertakings to a prosperous end.

It is beyond all doubt, as your highness ackuowledgeth, that Ireland and all the other islands on which the light of the gospel of Christ has dawned and which have received the knowledge of the Christian faith, do of right belong and appertain to St. Peter and the holy Roman church. Wherefore we are the more desirous to sow in them the acceptable seed of God's word, because we know that it will be strictly required of us hereafter. You have signified to us, our well-beloved son in Christ, that you propose to enter the island of Ireland in order to subdue the people, and make them obedient to laws, and to root out from among them the weeds of sin; and that you are willing to yield and pay yearly from every house the pension of one penny to St. Peter, and to keep and preserve the rights of the churches in that land whole and inviolate.

We therefore, regarding your pious and laudable design with due favour, and graciously assenting to your petition, do hereby declare our will and pleasure, that, for the purpose of enlarging the borders of the church, setting bounds to the progress of wickedness, reforming evil manners, planting virtue, and increasing the Christian religion, you do enter and take possession of that island, and execute therein whatsoever shall be for God's honour and the welfare of the same.

And further, we do also strictly charge and require that the people of that land shall accept you with all honour, and dutifully obey you, as their liege lord, saving only the rights of the churches, which we will have inviolably preserved; and reserving to St. Peter and the holy Roman church the yearly pension of one penny from each house.

If therefore you bring your purpose to good effect, let it be your study to improve the habits of that people, and take such orders by yourself, or by others whom you shall think fitting, for their lives, manners, and conversation, that the church there may be adorned by them, the Christian faith be planted and increased, and all that concerns the honour of God and the salvation of souls be ordered by you in like manner; so that you may receive at God's hands the blessed reward of everlasting life, and may obtain on earth a glorious name in ages to come.

Translation by John O'Driscol from 1827[13][edit]

Adrian, Bishop, servant of the servants of God, to his dearest son in Christ, the illustrious king of England, greeting, and apostolic benediction.

Full laudably and profitably hath your magnificence conceived the design of propagating your glorious renown on earth, and completing your reward of eternal happiness in heaven; while, as a Catholic prince, you are intent on enlarging the borders of the church, teaching the truth of the Christian faith to the ignorant and rude, exterminating the roots of vice from the field of the Lord, and, for the more convenient execution of this purpose, requiring the counsel and favour of the apostolic see. In which, the maturer your deliberation, and the greater the discretion of your procedure, by so much the happier, we trust, will be your progress, with the assistance of the Lord ; as all things are used to come to a prosperous end and issue, which take their beginning from the ardour of faith and the love of religion.

There is indeed no doubt but that Ireland, and all the islands on which Christ the Sun of Righteousness hath shone, and which have received the doctrines of the Christian faith, do belong to the jurisdiction of St. Peter and of the holy Roman church, as your excellency also doth acknowledge. And therefore we are the more solicitous to propagate the righteous plantation of faith in this land, and the branch acceptable to God, as we have the secret conviction of conscience that this is more especially our bounden duty.

You, then, most dear son in Christ, have signified to us your desire to enter into the island of Ireland, in order to reduce the people to obedience unto laws, and to extirpate the plants of vice; and that you are willing to pay from each house a yearly pension of one penny to St. Peter, and that you v^^ill preserve the rights of the churches of this land whole and inviolate. We, therefore, with that grace and acceptance suited to your pious and laudable design, and favourably assenting to your petition, do hold it good and acceptable, that, for extending the borders of the church, restraining the progress of vice, for the correction of manners, the planting of virtue, and the increase of religion, you enter this island, and execute therein whatever shall pertain to the honour of God and welfare of the land; and that the people of this land receive you honourably, and reverence you as their lord: the rights of their churches still remaining sacred and inviolate ; and saving to St. Peter the annual pension of one penny from every house.

If then you be resolved to carry the design you have conceived into effectual execution, study to form this nation to virtuous manners; and labour, by yourself, and others whom you shall judge meet for this work, in faith, word, and life, that the church may be there adorned, that the religion of the Christian faith may be planted and grow up, and that all things pertaining to the honour of God and the salvation of souls be so ordered, that you may be entitled to the fulness of eternal reward from God, and obtain a glorious renown on earth throughout all ages.

Notes[edit]

  1. The Doubtful Grant of Ireland By Pope Adrian IV to King Henry Investigated, Laurence Ginnell, Fallon & Co, Dublin (1899), pg. 14-15
  2. The complete works of Giraldus, were published in eight volumes by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, Adrian's privilege occurs three times, they are in the first, fifth, and eighth volumes. This is a literal translation from the eighth volume by Laurence Ginnell.
  3. James F. Dimock, 1867, Giraldus Cambrensis, vol. v, pp. 317-319, Longman & Co.
  4. The Pope and Ireland, Stephen J. McCormick, A. Waldteufel, San Francisco (1889), Pg.27
  5. Monastic Life in the Middle Ages, Cardinal Gasquet, G. Bell and Sons, LTD. London (1922), pp. 153-154
  6. The spelling is as it appears in the book cited
  7. Patrologiæ Cursus, tom. 188, p. 1441.
  8. cited in Nicholas Breakspear (Adrian IV.) Englishman and Pope, Alfread H. Tarleton,, Arthur L. Humphreys, London (1896), pg. 159-160
  9. The book of Erin, or, Ireland's story told to the new democracy, John Morrison Davidson, William Reeves (London), pg.40-42
  10. J. Morrison Davidson suggests that Henry's mandate for the Conquest of Ireland, was granted in 1155
  11. The Pope and Ireland, Stephen J. McCormick, A. Waldteufel, San Francisco (1889), pg.27
  12. The Historical Works of Giraldus Cambrensis, Thomas Wright, George Bell & Sons (London 1905), pg. 260-262
  13. The History of Ireland Vol I, John O'Driscol, Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green (London 1827), pg. 416-417


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923. It may be copyrighted outside the U.S. (see Help:Public domain).