Le Morte d'Arthur/Volume I

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Le Morte d'Arthur
by Thomas Malory
Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table. This is the original, Middle English version of Le Morte d'Arthur.

Le Morte d'Arthur

Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table

IN TWO VOLS.--VOL. I


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

THE Morte Darthur was finished, as the epilogue tells us, in the ninth year of Edward IV., i.e. between March 4, 1469 and the same date in 1470. It is thus, fitly enough, the last important English book written before the introduction of printing into this country, and since no manuscript of it has come down to us it is also the first English classic for our knowledge of which we are entirely dependent on a printed text. Caxton's story of how the book was brought to him and he was induced to print it may be read farther on in his own preface. From this we learn also that he was not only the printer of the book, but to some extent its editor also, dividing Malory's work into twenty-one books, splitting up the books into chapters, by no means skilfully, and supplying the ``Rubrish or chapter-headings. It may be added that Caxton's preface contains, moreover, a brief criticism which, on the points on which it touches, is still the soundest and most sympathetic that has been written.

Caxton finished his edition the last day of July 1485, some fifteen or sixteen years after Malory wrote his epilogue. It is clear that the author was then dead, or the printer would not have acted as a clumsy editor to the book, and recent discoveries (if bibliography may, for the moment, enlarge its bounds to mention such matters) have revealed with tolerable certainty when Malory died and who he was. In letters to The Athenaeum in July 1896 Mr. T. Williams pointed out that the name of a Sir Thomas Malorie occurred among those of a number of other Lancastrians excluded from a general pardon granted <vi>by Edward IV. in 1468, and that a William Mallerye was mentioned in the same year as taking part in a Lancastrian rising. In September 1897, again, in another letter to the same paper, Mr. A. T. Martin reported the finding of the will of a Thomas Malory of Papworth, a hundred partly in Cambridgeshire, partly in Hunts. This will was made on September 16, 1469, and as it was proved the 27th of the next month the testator must have been in immediate expectation of death. It contains the most careful provision for the education and starting in life of a family of three daughters and seven sons, of whom the youngest seems to have been still an infant. We cannot say with certainty that this Thomas Malory, whose last thoughts were so busy for his children, was our author, or that the Lancastrian knight discovered by Mr. Williams was identical with either or both, but such evidence as the Morte Darthur offers favours such a belief. There is not only the epilogue with its petition, ``pray for me while I am alive that God send me good deliverance and when I am dead pray you all for my soul, but this very request is foreshadowed at the end of chap. 37 of Book ix. in the touching passage, surely inspired by personal experience, as to the sickness ``that is the greatest pain a prisoner may have; and the reflections on English fickleness in the first chapter of Book xxi., though the Wars of the Roses might have inspired them in any one, come most naturally from an author who was a Lancastrian knight.

If the Morte Darthur was really written in prison and by a prisoner distressed by ill-health as well as by lack of liberty, surely no task was ever better devised to while away weary hours. Leaving abundant scope for originality in selection, modification, and arrangement, as a compilation and translation it had in it that mechanical element which adds the touch of restfulness to literary work. No original, it is said, has yet been found for Book vii., and it is possible that none will ever be forthcoming for chap. 20 of Book xviii., which describes the arrival of the body of the Fair Maiden of Astolat at Arthur's court, or <vii>for chap. 25 of the same book, with its discourse on true love; but the great bulk of the work has been traced chapter by chapter to the ``Merlin of Robert de Borron and his successors (Bks. i.-iv.), the English metrical romance La Morte Arthur of the Thornton manuscript (Bk. v.), the French romances of Tristan (Bks. viii.-x.) and of Launcelot (Bks. vi., xi.-xix.), and lastly to the English prose Morte Arthur of Harley MS. 2252 (Bks. xviii., xx., xxi.). As to Malory's choice of his authorities critics have not failed to point out that now and again he gives a worse version where a better has come down to us, and if he had been able to order a complete set of Arthurian manuscripts from his bookseller, no doubt he would have done even better than he did! But of the skill, approaching to original genius, with which he used the books from which he worked there is little dispute.

Malory died leaving his work obviously unrevised, and in this condition it was brought to Caxton, who prepared it for the press with his usual enthusiasm in the cause of good literature, and also, it must be added, with his usual carelessness. New chapters are sometimes made to begin in the middle of a sentence, and in addition to simple misprints there are numerous passages in which it is impossible to believe that we have the text as Malory intended it to stand. After Caxton's edition Malory's manuscript must have disappeared, and subsequent editions are differentiated only by the degree of closeness with which they follow the first. Editions appeared printed by Wynkyn de Worde in 1498 and 1529, by William Copland in 1559, by Thomas East about 1585, and by Thomas Stansby in 1634, each printer apparently taking the text of his immediate predecessor and reproducing it with modifications. Stansby's edition served for reprints in 1816 and 1856 (the latter edited by Thomas Wright); but in 1817 an edition supervised by Robert Southey went back to Caxton's text, though to a copy (only two are extant, and only one perfect!) in which eleven leaves were supplied from Wynkyn de Worde's reprint. In 1868 Sir Edward <viii>Strachey produced for the present publishers a reprint of Southey's text in modern spelling, with the substitution of current words for those now obsolete, and the softening of a handful of passages likely, he thought, to prevent the book being placed in the hands of boys. In 1889 a boon was conferred on scholars by the publication of Dr. H. Oskar Sommer's page-for-page reprint of Caxton's text, with an elaborate discussion of Malory's sources. Dr. Sommer's edition was used by Sir E. Strachey to revise his Globe text, and in 1897 Mr. Israel Gollancz produced for the ``Temple Classics a very pretty edition in which Sir Edward Strachey's principles of modernisation in spelling and punctuation were adopted, but with the restoration of obsolete words and omitted phrases. As to the present edition, Sir Edward Strachey altered with so sparing a hand that on many pages differences between his version and that here printed will be looked for in vain; but the most anxious care has been taken to produce a text modernised as to its spelling, but in other respects in accurate accordance with Caxton's text, as represented by Dr Sommer's reprint. Obvious misprints have been silently corrected, but in a few cases notes show where emendations have been introduced from Wynkyn de Worde--not that Wynkyn had any more right to emend Caxton than we, but because even a printer's conjecture gains a little sanctity after four centuries. The restoration of obsolete words has necessitated a much fuller glossary, and the index of names has therefore been separated from it and enlarged. In its present form the index is the work of Mr. Henry Littlehales.

A. W. POLLARD.

Contents[edit]

Preface

The Table or Rubrysshe of the Content of Chapters[edit]

Shortly of the First Book of King Arthur.[edit]

  • Chapter I: How Uther Pendragon sent for the duke of Cornwall and Igraine his wife, and of their departing suddenly again
  • Chapter II: How Uther Pendragon made war on the duke of Cornwall, and how by the mean of Merlin he lay by the duchess and gat Arthur
  • Chapter III: Of the birth of King Arthur and of his nurture
  • Chapter IV: And of the death of King Uther Pendragon
  • Chapter V: And how Arthur was chosen king, and of wonders and marvels of a sword taken out of a stone by the said Arthur
  • Chapter VI: How King Arthur pulled out the sword divers times
  • Chapter VII: How King Arthur was crowned, and how he made officers
  • Chapter VIII: How King Arthur held in Wales, at a Pentecost, a great feast, and what kings and lords came to his feast
  • Chapter IX: Of the first war that King Arthur had, and how he won the field
  • Chapter X: How Merlin counselled King Arthur to send for King Ban and King Bors, and of their counsel taken for the war
  • Chapter XI: Of a great tourney made by King Arthur and the two kings Ban and Bors, and how they went over the sea
  • Chapter XII: How eleven kings gathered a great host against King Arthur
  • Chapter XIII: Of a dream of the King with the Hundred Knights
  • Chapter XIV: How the eleven kings with their host fought against Arthur and his host, and many great feats of the war
  • Chapter XV: Yet of the same battle
  • Chapter XVI: Yet more of the same battle
  • Chapter XVII: Yet more of the said battle, and how it was ended by Merlin
  • Chapter XVIII: How King Arthur, King Ban, and King Bors rescued King Leodegrance, and other incidents
  • Chapter XIX: How King Arthur rode to Carlion, and of his dream, and how he saw the Questing Beast
  • Chapter XX: How King Pellinore took Arthur's horse and followed the Questing Beast, and how Merlin met with Arthur
  • Chapter XXI: How Ulfius impeached Queen Igraine, Arthur's mother, of treason; and how a knight came and desired to have the death of his master revenged
  • Chapter XXII: How Griflet was made knight, and jousted with a knight
  • Chapter XXIII: How twelve knights came from Rome and asked truage for this land of Arthur, and how Arthur fought with a knight
  • Chapter XXIV: How Merlin saved Arthur's life, and threw an enchantment on King Pellinore and made him to sleep
  • Chapter XXV: How Arthur by the mean of Merlin gat Excalibur his sword of the Lady of the Lake
  • Chapter XXVI: How tidings came to Arthur that King Rience had overcome eleven kings, and how he desired Arthur's beard to trim his mantle
  • Chapter XXVII: How all the children were sent for that were born on May-day, and how Mordred was saved

Books II through IX (needs to be split) Glossary

The Second Book[edit]

  • Chapter I: Of a damosel which came girt with a sword for to find a man of such virtue to draw it out of the scabbard
  • Chapter II: How Balin, arrayed like a poor knight, pulled out the sword, which afterward was cause of his death
  • Chapter III: How the Lady of the Lake demanded the knight's head that had won the sword, or the maiden's head
  • Chapter IV: How Merlin told the adventure of this damosel
  • Chapter V: How Balin was pursued by Sir Lanceor, knight of Ireland, and how he jousted and slew him
  • Chapter VI: How a damosel, which was love to Lanceor, slew herself for love, and how Balin met with his brother Balan
  • Chapter VII: How a dwarf reproved Balin for the death of Lanceor, and how King Mark of Cornwall found them, and made a tomb over them
  • Chapter VIII: How Merlin prophesied that two the best knights of the world should fight there, which were Sir Lancelot and Sir Tristram
  • Chapter IX: How Balin and his brother, by the counsel of Merlin, took King Rience and brought him to King Arthur
  • Chapter X: How King Arthur had a battle against Nero and King Lot of Orkney, and how King Lot was deceived by Merlin, and how twelve kings were slain
  • Chapter XI: Of the interment of twelve kings, and of the prophecy of Merlin, and how Balin should give the dolorous stroke
  • Chapter XII: How a sorrowful knight came before Arthur, and how Balin fetched him, and how that knight was slain by a knight invisible
  • Chapter XIII: ow Balin and the damosel met with a knight which was in likewise slain, and how the damosel bled for the custom of a castle
  • Chapter XIV: How Balin met with that knight named Garlon at a feast, and there he slew him, to have his blood to heal therewith the son of his host
  • Chapter XV: How Balin fought with King Pellam, and how his sword brake, and how he gat a spear wherewith he smote the dolorous stroke
  • Chapter XVI: How Balin was delivered by Merlin, and saved a knight that would have slain himself for love
  • Chapter XVII: How that knight slew his love and a knight lying by her, and after, how he slew himself with his own sword, and how Balin rode toward a castle where he lost his life
  • Chapter XVIII: How Balin met with his brother Balan, and how each of them slew other unknown, till they were wounded to death
  • Chapter XIX: How Merlin buried them both in one tomb, and of Balin's sword

Here follow the Chapters of the Third Book.[edit]

  • Chapter I: How King Arthur took a wife, and wedded Guenever, daughter to Leodegrance, King of the Land of Cameliard, with whom he had the Round Table
  • Chapter II: How the Knights of the Round Table were ordained and their sieges blessed by the Bishop of Canterbury
  • Chapter III: How a poor man, riding upon a lean mare, desired King Arthur to make his son knight
  • Chapter IV: How Sir Tor was known for son of King Pellinore, and how Gawaine was made knight
  • Chapter V: How at the feast of the wedding of King Arthur to Guenever, a white hart came into the hall, and thirty couple hounds, and how a brachet pinched the hart, which was taken away
  • Chapter VI: How Sir Gawaine rode for to fetch again the hart, and how two brethren fought each against other for the hart
  • Chapter VII: How the hart was chased into a castle and there slain, and how Sir Galraine slew a lady
  • Chapter VIII: How four knights fought against Sir Gawaine and Gaheris, and how they were overcome, and their lives saved at the request of four ladies
  • Chapter IX: How Sir Tor rode after the knight with the brachet, and of his adventure by the way
  • Chapter X: How Sir Tor found the brachet with a lady, and how a knight assailed him for the said brachet
  • Chapter XI: How Sir Tor overcame the knight, and how he lost his head at the request of a lady
  • Chapter XII: How King Pellinore rode after the lady and the knight that led her away, and how a lady desired help of him, and how he fought with two knights for that lady, of whom he slew the one at the first stroke
  • Chapter XIII: How King Pellinore gat the lady and brought her to Camelot to the court of King Arthur
  • Chapter XIV: How on the way he heard two knights, as he lay by night in a valley, and of other adventures
  • Chapter XV: How when he was come to Camelot he was sworn upon a book to tell the truth of his quest

Here follow the Chapters of the Fourth Book.[edit]

  • Chapter I: How Merlin was assotted and doted on one of the ladies of the lake, and how he was shut in a rock under a stone and there died
  • Chapter II: How five kings came into this land to war against King Arthur, and what counsel Arthur had against them
  • Chapter III: How King Arthur had ado with them and overthrew them, and slew the five kings and made the remnant to flee
  • Chapter IV: How the battle was finished or he came, and how King Arthur founded an abbey where the battle was
  • Chapter V: How Sir Tor was made knight of the Round Table, and how Bagdemagus was displeased
  • Chapter VI: How King Arthur, King Uriens, and Sir Accolon of Gaul, chased an hart, and of their marvellous adventures
  • Chapter VII: How Arthur took upon him to fight to be delivered out of prison, and also for to deliver twenty knights that were in prison
  • Chapter VIII: How Accolon found himself by a well, and he took upon him to do battle against Arthur
  • Chapter IX: Of the battle between King Arthur and Accolon
  • Chapter X: How King Arthur's sword that he fought with brake, and how he recovered of Accolon his own sword Excalibur, and overcame his enemy
  • Chapter XI: How Accolon confessed the treason of Morgan le Fays King Arthur's sister, and how she would have done slay him
  • Chapter XII: How Arthur accorded the two brethren, and delivered the twenty knights, and how Sir Accolon died
  • Chapter XIII: How Morgan would have slain Sir Uriens her husband, and how Sir Uwaine her son saved him
  • Chapter XIV: How Queen Morgan le Fay made great sorrow f-or the death of Accolon, and how she stole away the scabbard from Arthur
  • Chapter XV: How Morgan le Fay saved a knight that should have been drowned, and how King Arthur returned home again
  • Chapter XVI: How the Damosel of the Lake saved King Arthur from a mantle which should have burnt him
  • Chapter XVII: How Sir Gawaine and Sir Uwaine met with twelve fair damosels, and how they complained on Sir Marhaus
  • Chapter XVIII: How Sir Marhaus jousted with Sir Gawaine and Sir Uwaine, and overthrew them both
  • Chapter XIX: How Sir Marhaus, Sir Gawaine, and Sir Uwaine met three damosels, and each of them took one
  • Chapter XX: How a knight and a dwarf strove for a lady
  • Chapter XXI: How King Pelleas suffered himself to be taken prisoner because he would have a sight of his lady, and how Sir Gawaine promised him to get to him the love of his lady
  • Chapter XXII: How Sir Gawaine came to the Lady Ettard, and how Sir Pelleas found them sleeping
  • Chapter XXIII: How Sir Pelleas loved no more Ettard by the mean of the Damosel of the Lake, whom he loved ever after
  • Chapter XXIV: How Sir Marhaus rode with the damosel, and how he came to the Duke of the South Marches
  • Chapter XXV: How Sir Marhaus fought with the duke and his four sons and made them to yield them
  • Chapter XXVI: How Sir Uwaine rode with the damosel of sixty year of age, and how he gat the prize at tourneying
  • Chapter XXVII: How Sir Uwaine fought with two knights and overcame them
  • Chapter XXVIII: How at the year's end all three knights with their three damosels met at the fountain

Of the Fifth Book the Chapters follow.[edit]

  • Chapter I: How twelve aged ambassadors of Rome came to King Arthur to demand truage for Britain
  • Chapter II: How the kings and lords promised to King Arthur aid and help against the Romans
  • Chapter III: How King Arthur held a parliament at York, and how he ordained the realm should be governed in his absence
  • Chapter IV: How King Arthur being shipped and lying in his cabin had a marvellous dream and of the exposition thereof
  • Chapter V: How a man of the country told to him of a marvellous giant, and how he fought and conquered him
  • Chapter VI: How King Arthur sent Sir Gawaine and other to Lucius, and how they were assailed and escaped with worship
  • Chapter VII: How Lucius sent certain spies in a bushment for to have taken his knights being prisoners, and how they were letted
  • Chapter VIII: How a senator told to Lucius of their discomfiture, and also of the great battle between Arthur and Lucius
  • Chapter IX: How Arthur, after he had achieved the battle against the Romans, entered into Almaine, and so into Italy
  • Chapter X: Of a battle done by Gawaine against a Saracen, which after was yielden and became Christian
  • Chapter XI: How the Saracens came out of a wood for to rescue their beasts, and of a great battle
  • Chapter XII: How Sir Gawaine returned to King Arthur with his prisoners, and how the King won a city, and how he was crowned Emperor

Here follow the Chapters of the Sixth Book.[edit]

  • Chapter I: How Sir Launcelot and Sir Lionel departed from the court for to seek adventures, and how Sir Lionel left him sleeping and was taken
  • Chapter II: How Sir Ector followed for to seek Sir Launcelot, and how he was taken by Sir Turquine
  • Chapter III: How four queens found Launcelot sleeping, and how by enchantment he was taken and led into a castle
  • Chapter IV: How Sir Launcelot was delivered by the mean of a damosel
  • Chapter V: How a knight found Sir Launcelot lying in his leman's bed, and how Sir Launcelot fought with the knight
  • Chapter VI: How Sir Launcelot was received of King Bagdemagus' daughter, and how he made his complaint to her father
  • Chapter VII: How Sir Launcelot behaved him in a tournament, and how he met with Sir Turquine leading Sir Gaheris
  • Chapter VIII: How Sir Launcelot and Sir Turquine fought together
  • Chapter IX: How Sir Turquine was slain, and how Sir Launcelot bade Sir Gaheris deliver all the prisoners
  • Chapter X: How Sir Launcelot rode with a damosel and slew a knight that distressed all ladies and also a villain that kept a bridge
  • Chapter XI: How Sir Launcelot slew two giants, and made a castle free
  • Chapter XII: How Sir Launcelot rode disguised in Sir Kay's harness, and how he smote down a knight
  • Chapter XIII: How Sir Launcelot jousted against four knights of the Round Table and overthrew them
  • Chapter XIV: How Sir Launcelot followed a brachet into a castle, where he found a dead knight, and how he after was required of a damosel to heal her brother
  • Chapter XV: How Sir Launcelot came into the Chapel Perilous and gat there of a dead corpse a piece of the cloth and a sword
  • Chapter XVI: How Sir Launcelot at the request of a lady recovered a falcon, by which he was deceived
  • Chapter XVII: How Sir Launcelot overtook a knight which chased his wife to have slain her, and how he said to him
  • Chapter XVIII: How Sir Launcelot came to King Arthur's Court, and how there were recounted all his noble feats and acts

Here follow the Chapters of the Seventh Book.[edit]

  • Chapter I: How Beaumains came to King Arthur's court and demanded three petitions of King Arthur
  • Chapter II: How Sir Launcelot and Sir Gawaine were wroth because Sir Kay mocked Beaumains, and of a damosel which desired a knight to fight for a lady
  • Chapter III: How Beaumains desired the battle, and how it was granted to him, and how he desired to be made knight of Sir Launcelot
  • Chapter IV: How Beaumains departed, and how he gat of Sir Kay a spear and a shield, and how he jousted with Sir Launcelot
  • Chapter V: How Beaumains told to Sir Launcelot his name, and how he was dubbed knight of Sir Launcelot, and after overtook the damosel
  • Chapter VI: How Beaumains fought and slew two knights at a passage
  • Chapter VII: How Beaumains fought with the Knight of the Black Launds, and fought with him till he fell down and died
  • Chapter VIII: How the brother of the knight that was slain met with Beaumains, and fought with Beaumains till he was yielden
  • Chapter IX: How the damosel ever rebuked Beaumains, and would not suffer him to sit at her table, but called him kitchen boy
  • Chapter X: How the third brother, called the Red Knight, jousted and fought against Beaumains, and how Beaumains overcame him
  • Chapter XI: How Sir Beaumains suffered great rebukes of the damosel, and he suffered it patiently
  • Chapter XII: How Beaumains fought with Sir Persant of Inde, and made him to be yielden
  • Chapter XIII: Of the goodly communication between Sir Persant and Beaumains, and how he told him that his name was Sir Gareth
  • Chapter XIV: How the lady that was besieged had word from her sister how she had brought a knight to fight for her, and what battles he had achieved
  • Chapter XV: How the damosel and Beaumains came to the siege, and came to a sycamore tree, and there Beaumains blew a horn, and then the Knight of the Red Launds came to fight with him
  • Chapter XVI: How the two knights met together, and of their talking, and how they began their battle
  • Chapter XVII: How after long fighting Beaumains overcame the knight and would have slain him, but at the request of the lords he saved his life and made him to yield him to the lady
  • Chapter XVIII: How the knight yielded him, and how Beaumains made him to go unto King Arthur's court, and to cry Sir Launcelot mercy
  • Chapter XIX: How Beaumains came to the lady, and when he came to the castle the gates were closed against him, and of the words that the lady said to him
  • Chapter XX: How Sir Beaumains rode after to rescue his dwarf, and came into the castle where he was
  • Chapter XXI: How Sir Gareth, otherwise called Beaumains, came to the presence of his lady, and how they took acquaintance, and of their love
  • Chapter XXII: How at night came an armed knight, and fought with Sir Gareth, and he, sort hurt in the thigh, smote off the knight's head
  • Chapter XXIII: How the said knight came again the next night and was beheaded again, and how at the feast of Pentecost all the knights that Sir Gareth had overcome came and yielded them to King Arthur
  • Chapter XXIV: How King Arthur pardoned them, and demanded of them where Sir Gareth was
  • Chapter XXV: How the Queen of Orkney came to this feast of Pentecost, and Sir Gawaine and his brethren came to ask her blessing
  • Chapter XXVI: How King Arthur sent for the Lady Lionesse, and how she let cry a tourney at her castle, whereas came many knights
  • Chapter XXVII: How King Arthur went to the tournament with his knights, and how the lady received him worshipfully, and how the knights encountered
  • Chapter XXVIII: How the knights bare them in the battle
  • Chapter XXIX: Yet of the said tournament
  • Chapter XXX: How Sir Gareth was espied by the heralds, and how he escaped out of the field
  • Chapter XXXI: How Sir Gareth came to a castle where he was well lodged, and he jousted with a knight and slew him
  • Chapter XXXII: How Sir Gareth fought with a knight that held within his castle thirty ladies, and how he slew him
  • Chapter XXXIII: How Sir Gareth and Sir Gawaine fought each against other, and how they knew each other by the damosel Linet
  • Chapter XXXIV: How Sir Gareth knowledged that they loved each other to King Arthur, and of the appointment of their wedding
  • Chapter XXXV: Of the Great Royalty, and what officers were made at the feast of the wedding, and of the jousts at the feast

Here follow the Chapters of the Eighth Book.[edit]

  • Chapter I: How Sir Tristram de Liones was born, and how his mother died at his birth, wherefore she named him Tristram
  • Chapter II: How the stepmother of Sir Tristram had ordained poison for to have poisoned Sir Tristram
  • Chapter III: How Sir Tristram was sent into France, and had one to govern him named Gouvernail, and how he learned to harp, hawk, and hunt
  • Chapter IV: How Sir Marhaus came out of Ireland for to ask truage of Cornwall, or else he would fight therefore
  • Chapter V: How Tristram enterprized the battle to fight for the truage of Corn wall, and how he was made knight
  • Chapter VI: How Sir Tristram arrived into the Island for to furnish the battle with Sir Marhaus
  • Chapter VII: How Sir Tristram fought against Sir Marhaus and achieved his battle, and how Sir Marhaus fled to his ship
  • Chapter VIII: How Sir Marhaus after that he was arrived in Ireland died of the stroke that Sir Tristram had given him, and how Tristram was hurt
  • Chapter IX: How Sir Tristram was put to the keeping of La Beale Isoud first for to be healed of his wound
  • Chapter X: How Sir Tristram won the degree at a tournament in Ireland, and there made Palamides to bear no harness in a year
  • Chapter XI: How the queen espied that Sir Tristram had slain her brother Sir Marhaus by his sword, and in what jeopardy he was
  • Chapter XII: How Sir Tristram departed from the king and La Beale Isoud out of Ireland for to come into Cornwall
  • Chapter XIII: How Sir Tristram and King Mark 11U ted each other for the love of a knight's wife
  • Chapter XIV: How Sir Tristram lay with the lady, and how h er husband fought with Sir Tristram
  • Chapter XV: How Sir Bleoberis demanded the fairest lady in King Mark's court, whom he took away, and how he w as fought with
  • Chapter XVI: How Sir Tristram fought with two knights of the Round Table
  • Chapter XVII: How Sir Tristram fought with Sir Bleoberis for a lady, and how the lady was put to choice to whom she would go
  • Chapter XVIII: How the lady forsook Sir Tristram and abode with Sir Bleoberis, and how she desired to go to her husband
  • Chapter XIX: How King Mark sent Sir Tristram for La Beale Isoud toward Ireland, and how by fortune he arrived into England
  • Chapter XX: How King Anguish of Ireland was summoned to come to King Arthur's court for treason
  • Chapter XXI: How Sir Tristram rescued a child from a knight, and how Gouvernail told him of King Anguish
  • Chapter XXII: How Sir Tristram fought for Sir Anguish and overcame his adversary, and how his adversary would never yield him
  • Chapter XXIII: How Sir Blamore desired Tristram to slay him, and how Sir Tristram spared him, and how they took appointment
  • Chapter XXIV: How Sir Tristram demanded La Beale Isoud for King Mark, and how Sir Tristram and Isoud drank the love drink
  • Chapter XXV: How Sir Tristram and Isoud were in prison, and how he fought for her beauty, and smote off another lady's head
  • Chapter XXVI: How Sir Tristram fought with Sir Breunor, and at the last smote off his head
  • Chapter XXVII: How Sir Galahad fought with Sir Tristram, and how Sir Tristram yielded him and promised to fellowship with Launcelot
  • Chapter XXVIII: How Sir Launcelot met with Sir Carados bearing away Sir Gawaine, and of the rescue of Sir Gawaine
  • Chapter XXIX: Of the wedding of King Mark to La Beale Isoud, and of Bragwaine her maid, and of Palamides
  • Chapter XXX: How Palamides demanded Queen Isoud, and how Lambegus rode after to rescue her, and of the escape of Isoud
  • Chapter XXXI: How Sir Tristram rode after Palamides, and how he found him and fought with him, and by the means of Isoud the battle ceased
  • Chapter XXXII: How Sir Tristram brought Queen Isoud home, and of the debate of King Mark and Sir Tristram
  • Chapter XXXIII: How Sir Lamorak jousted with thirty knights, and Sir Tristram at the request of King Mark smote his horse down
  • Chapter XXXIV: How Sir Lamorak sent an horn to King Mark in despite of Sir Tristram, and how Sir Tristram was driven into a chapel
  • Chapter XXXV: How Sir Tristram was holpen by his men, and of Queen Isoud which was put in a lazar-cote, and how Tristram was hurt
  • Chapter XXXVI: How Sir Tristram served in war King Howel of Brittany, and slew his adversary in the field
  • Chapter XXXVII: How Sir Suppinabiles told Sir Tristram how he was defamed in the court of King Arthur, and of Sir Lamorak
  • Chapter XXXVIII: How Sir Tristram and his wife arrived in Wales, and how he met there with Sir Lamorak
  • Chapter XXXIX: How Sir Tristram fought with Sir Nabon, and overcame him, and made Sir Segwarides lord of the isle
  • Chapter XL: How Sir Lamorak departed from Sir Tristram, and how he met with Sir Frol, and after with Sir Launcelot
  • Chapter XLI: How Sir Lamorak slew Sir Frol, and of the courteous fighting with Sir Belliance his brother

Here follow the Chapters of the Ninth Book.[edit]

  • Chapter I: How a young man came into the court of King Arthur, and how Sir Kay called him in scorn La Cote Male Taile
  • Chapter II: How a damosel came into the court and desired a knight to take on him an enquest, which La Cote Male Taile emprised
  • Chapter III: How La Cote Male Taile overthrew Sir Dagonet the king's fool, and of the rebuke that he had of the damosel
  • Chapter IV: How La Cote Male Taile fought against an hundred knights, and how he escaped by the mean of a lady
  • Chapter V: How Sir Launcelot came to the court and heard of La Cote Male Taile, and how he followed after him, and how La Cote Male Taile was prisoner
  • Chapter VI: How Sir Launcelot fought with six knights, and after with Sir Brian, and how he delivered the prisoners
  • Chapter VII: How Sir Launcelot met with the damosel named Maledisant, and named her the damosel Bienpensant
  • Chapter VIII: How La Cote Male Taile was taken prisoner, and after rescued by Sir Launcelot, and how Sir Launcelot overcame four brethren
  • Chapter IX: How Sir Launcelot made La Cote Male Taile lord of the Castle of Pendragon, and after was made knight of the Round Table
  • Chapter X: How La Beale Isoud sent letters to Sir Tristram by her maid Bragwaine, and of divers adventures of Sir Tristram
  • Chapter XI: How Sir Tristram met with Sir Lamorak de Galis, and how they fought, and after accorded never to fight together
  • Chapter XII: How Sir Palomides followed the Questing Beast, and smote down Sir Tristram and Sir Lamorak with one spear
  • Chapter XIII: How Sir Lamorak met with Sir Meliagaunce, and fought together for the beauty of Dame Guenever
  • Chapter XIV: How Sir Meliagaunce told for what cause they fought, and how Sir Lamorak jousted with King Arthur
  • Chapter XV: How Sir Kay met with Sir Tristram, and after of the shame spoken of the knights of Cornwall, and how they jousted
  • Chapter XVI: How King Arthur was brought into the Forest Perilous, and how Sir Tristram saved his life
  • Chapter XVII: How Sir Tristram came to La Beale Isoud, and how Kehydius began to love Beale Isoud, and of a letter that Tristram found
  • Chapter XVIII: How Sir Tristram departed from Tintagil, and how he sorrowed and was so long in a forest till he was out of his mind
  • Chapter XIX: How Sir Tristram soused Dagonet in a well, and how Palomides sent a damosel to seek Tristram, and how Palomides met with King Mark
  • Chapter XX: How it was noised how Sir Tristram was dead, and how La Beale Isoud would have slain herself
  • Chapter XXI: How King Mark found Sir Tristram naked, and made him to be borne home to Tintagil, and how he was there known by a brachet
  • Chapter XXII: How King Mark, by the advice of his council, banished Sir Tristram out of Cornwall the term of ten years
  • Chapter XXIII: How a damosel sought help to help Sir Launcelot against thirty knights, and how Sir Tristram fought with them
  • Chapter XXIV: How Sir Tristram and Sir Dinadan came to a lodging where they must joust with two knights
  • Chapter XXV: How Sir Tristram jousted with Sir Kay and Sir Sagramore le Desirous, and how Sir Gawaine turned Sir Tristram from Morgan le Fay
  • Chapter XXVI: How Sir Tristram and Sir Gawaine rode to have foughten with the thirty knights, but they durst not come out
  • Chapter XXVII: How damosel Bragwaine found Tristram sleeping by a well, and how she delivered letters to him from La Beale Isoud
  • Chapter XXVIII: How Sir Tristram had a fall with Sir Palomides, and how Launcelot overthrew two knights
  • Chapter XXIX: How Sir Launcelot jousted with Palomides and overthrew him, and after he was assailed with twelve knights
  • Chapter XXX: How Sir Tristram behaved him the first day of the tournament, and there he had the prize
  • Chapter XXXI: How Sir Tristram returned against King Arthur's party because he saw Sir Palomides on that party
  • Chapter XXXII: How Sir Tristram found Palomides by a well, and brought him with him to his lodging
  • Chapter XXXIII: How Sir Tristram smote down Sir Palomides, and how he jousted with King Arthur, and other feats
  • Chapter XXXIV: How Sir Launcelot hurt Sir Tristram, and how after Sir Tristram smote down Sir Palomides
  • Chapter XXXV: How the prize of the third day was given to Sir Launcelot, and Sir Launcelot gave it to Sir Tristram
  • Chapter XXXVI: How Palomides came to the castle where Sir Tristram was, and of the quest that Sir Launcelot and ten knights made for Sir Tristram
  • Chapter XXXVII: How Sir Tristram, Sir Palomides, and Sir Dinadan were taken and put in prison
  • Chapter XXXVIII: How King Mark was sorry for the good renown of Sir Tristram. Some of King Arthur's knights jousted with knights of Cornwall
  • Chapter XXXIX: Of the treason of King Mark, and how Sir Gaheris smote him down and Andred his cousin
  • Chapter XL: How after that Sir Tristram, Sir Palomides, and Sir Dinadan had been long in prison they werc delivered
  • Chapter XLI: How Sir Dinadan rescued a lady from Sir Breuse Saunce Pite, and how Sir Tristram received a shield of Morgan le Fay
  • Chapter XLII: How Sir Tristram took with him the shield, and also how he slew the paramour of Morgan le Fay
  • Chapter XLIII: How Morgan le Fey her paramour, and how Sir Tristram praised Sir Launcelot and his kin
  • Chapter XLIV: How Sir Tristram at a tournament bare the shield that Morgan le Fay delivered to him]]