Logic (Sigwart)

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Logic  (1895) 
by Christoph von Sigwart, translated by Helen Bosanquet

Volume I.[edit]

THE JUDGMENT, CONCEPT, AND INFERENCE


§ 1. The Problem of Logic
§ 2. Limits to the Problem
§ 3. The Postulate of Logic
§ 4. The Divisions of Logic
§ 5. The Proposition as the Expression of the Judgment. Subject and Predicate
§ 6. The Highest Categories of the Objects of Thought
§ 7. The General Idea and the Word
§ 8. Necessity of the Word as Predicate
I. Narrative Judgments
§ 9.   Denominative Judgments
§ 10. Judgments of Attributes and Activities
§ 11. Impersonal Judgments and Allied Forms
§ 12. Relational Judgments. Existential Propositions
§ 13. Judgments about Abstract Nouns
§ 14. The Objective Validity of the Judgment, and the Principle of Identity
§ 15. The Reference to Time in Narrative Judgments
II.   § 16. Explicative Judgments
III. § 17. The Act of Judgment as expressed in Language
§ 18. Immediate and Mediated, Analytical and Synthetical Judgments
§ 19. The Process of the Synthetical Judgment
§ 20. The Negation as Denial of the Judgment
§ 21. The Different Kinds of Negative Judgments
§ 22. Privation and Opposition as Ground of the Negation
§ 23. The Principle of Contradiction
§ 24. The Principle of Twofold Negation
§ 25. The Principle of the Excluded Middle
I. Positive Plural Judgments
§ 26. Positive Copulative and Plural Judgments
§ 27. The Universal Affirmative Judgment
§ 28. The Particular Affirmative Judgment
II.   § 29. Negative Plural Judgments
III. § 30. The Negation of Plural Judgments
I.     § 31. The so-called Modal Distinctions
§ 32. The Law of Sufficient Reason
II. Possible and Necessary as Predicates of Actual Judgments
§ 33. The Necessity of Reality
§ 34. Possibility
I.     § 35. The Different Ways in which Propositions may be Combined, and their Logical Significance
II.   § 36. The Hypothetical Judgment
III. § 37. The Disjunctive Judgment

Results § 38.

§ 39. The Conditions of Perfect Judgments
§ 40. Nature of the Logical Concept
§ 41. Analysis of the Concept into Simple Elements
§ 42. Super- and Subordination, Content and Extension of Concepts
§ 43. Division of Concepts
§ 44. Definition
§ 45. The Truth of Judgments about Concepts
§ 46. The Truth of Statements about Ourselves
§ 47. The Truth of Judgments of Perception
§ 48. Axioms and Postulates
§ 49. The Hypothetical Syllogism
§ 50. The Introduction of a Subject in the Hypothetical Syllogism
§ 51. The Different Sources of Hypothetical Major Premises
§ 52. Inferences according to Formal Logical Laws
§ 53. Inferences from Relations between Concepts
§ 54. The meaning of the Aristotelian Figures and Moods
§ 55. The Value of the Syllogism
§ 56. The Inference of Subsumption
§ 57. The Inference from Divisive Judgments
§ 58. The Disjunctive Syllogism
§ 59. The Relation between the Truth of the Conclusion and the Truth of the Premises


Volume II.[edit]

LOGICAL METHODS


This is a translation and has a separate copyright status from the original text. The license for the translation applies to this edition only.
Original:
This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.
 
Translation:
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1925, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.