Maps of Old London

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Maps of Old London  (1908) 
by Geraldine Edith Mitton

MAPS OF OLD LONDON

I. WYNGAERDE (IN THREE SECTIONS)
II. AGAS
III. SECTION OF AGAS
IV. HOEFNAGEL
V. NORDEN LONDON
VI. NORDEN WESTMINSTER
VII. FAITHORNE
VIII. OGILBY
IX. ROCQUE

LONDON
ADAM AND CHARLES BLACK
1908

EDWARD STANFORD,
Geographer to the King,
12, 13, and 14, Long Acre, London, W.C.


EDITOR'S NOTE

An atlas of Old London maps, showing the growth of the City throughout successive centuries, is now issued for the first time. Up to a recent date the maps here represented had not been reproduced in any form, and the originals were beyond the reach of all but the few. The London Topographical Society has done admirable work in hunting out and publishing most of them; but these reproductions are, as nearly as possible, facsimiles of the originals as regards size, as well as everything else. It is not every one who can afford to belong to the society, or who wishes to handle the maps in large sheets. In the present form they are brought within such handy compass that they will form a useful reference-book even to those who already own the large-scale ones, and, to the many who do not, they will be invaluable.

The maps here given are the best examples of those extant, and are chosen as each being representative of a special period. All but one have appeared in the volumes of Sir Walter Besant's great and exhaustive "Survey of London," for which they were prepared, and the publishers believe that in offering them separately from the books in this handy form they are consulting the interests of a very large number of readers.

The exception above noted is the map known as Faithorne's, showing London as it was before the Great Fire; this is added for purposes of comparison with that of Ogilby, which shows London rebuilt afterwards. Besides the maps properly so called, there are some smaller views of parts of London, all of which are included in the Survey.

The atlas does not presume in any way to be exhaustive, but is representative of the different periods through which London passed, and shows most strikingly the development of the City.

I must acknowledge the valuable assistance I have received from Mr. George Clinch, F.G.S., in the many difficulties which arose in the course of its preparation.

G. E. Mitton.