Notes by the Way

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Notes by the Way  (1909) 
by John Collins Francis
with Memoirs of John Joseph Knight, F.S.A.: Dramatic Critic and Editor of 'Notes and Queries,' 1883–1907 and the Rev. Joseph Woodfall Ebsworth, F.S.A. Editor of the Ballad Society's Publications Link to scans


Joseph Knight, F.S.A. (ætat 67).jpg
Joseph Knight, F.S.A. (Ætat 67).

Reproduced by permission of J. Caswall Smith.

Notes by the Way.

with

MEMOIRS

of

Joseph Knight, F.S.A.

Dramatic Critic
and
Editor of 'Notes and Queries,' 1883-1907

and the rev.

Joseph Woodfall Ebsworth, F.S.A.

Editor of the Ballad Society's Publications.


by
John Collins Francis


AUTHOR OF ‘JOHN FRANCIS AND “THE ATHENÆUM.” ’


T. FISHER UNWIN
LONDON : ADELPHI TERRACE
LEIPSIC : INSELSTRASSE 20


1909

CONTENTS.


JOSEPH KNIGHT.

His father and mother—His education—His first poem—"King of the College"—Joins Edward Hewitt in founding a Mechanics' Institute in Leeds—Gives a lecture before the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society on 'The Fairies of English Poetry' —His marriage—Leaves for London—Succeeds J. A. Heraud as dramatic critic of The Athenæum—Banquet to the Comédie Franchise—Reviews the French Academy's Dictionary in The Athenæum—Also 'Hypnerotomachia Poliphili'—Writes obituary notice of Philip James Bailey—His sonnet 'Love's Martyrdom'—Becomes Editor of Notes and Queries—Dramatic critic of The Daily Graphic and of The Globe—Contributions to the 'Dictionary of National Biography'—Writes Life of Rossetti—'The Bannerman's Lament'—Writes article on Cyrano de Bergerac for The Fortnightly Review—His "Sylvanus Urban" papers in The Gentleman's Magazine—His friendship for the publisher Mr. Andrew Chatto—Writes in The Idler on the Laureateship —Sunday evenings with the Marstons—Dramatic profession give him a dinner—His sorrow at the death of F. G. Stephens—His death—Tributes to his memory Pp. i-xliii

John Rippon, D.D.—George Bentley—Samplers—The unstamped Press—A centenarian1-10

CHAPTER II.

Literary Jubilees and Celebrations—The Daily NewsThe Guardian—First London halfpenny newspaper—Blackwood's MagazineThe Gentleman's Magazine—John Rylands Library11-34

CHAPTER III.

HISTORY OF 'NOTES AND QUERIES.'

William John Thoms—Photography: first specimens—Exhibitions of 1851 and 1862—Death of Duke of Wellington—Times memoir—Did Wellington and Nelson meet?—Death of the Prince Consort—Death of Charles Wentworth Dilke—Dr. Doran— Death of James Yeowell—Austin Dobson contributes a Rondeau—Death of Turle—Funeral—Knight becomes Editor—Dilke and Thoms "book-stalling"—Thoms loves books, but can "handle the gloves"—Banquet to him—Hyde Clarke—Dante Rossetti—Gabriel Rossetti—Mr. R. H. Thornton's 'Jubilee Greeting' and list of deceased contributors35-56


CHAPTER IV.

THE COWPER CENTENARY.

Cowper's sensitive temperament—His terrible lines—John Newton's influence beneficial—Happy years at Olney—His gratitude to Mrs. Unwin and Lady Hesketh—His last poem, 'The Castaway'—His death—Why the name is pronounced Cooper "The cup that cheers"—Cowper anticipated—Maitland on Cowper's works in America—Newton's preface—Dr. Morgan on John Gilpin—Origin of "God moves in a mysterious way"—Portraits of Cowper and of his mother—Letters sold at Sotheby's57-73


War Correspondents—The National Flag—Vanishing London—The United Free Church of Scotland—Downing Street—King Edward VII.'s Title in Scotland—The ninth Jubilee of Glasgow University 74-94


Civil List Pensions95-145


CHAPTER VII.

THE BEVIS MARKS BICENTENARY.

First Synagogue in England—"Gates of Hope" School—The "House of Life"—First Hebrew book published in England—'Jewish Portraits' by Lady Magnus—Halevi's 'Songs of Faith and Hope'—Jewish Historical Society—Rebecca in 'Ivanhoe'— David Salomons—Moses Montefiore—Baron Rothschild—Medal to Lord John Russell—Efficiency of Jewish schools—Jewish ethics146-160


The Leisure Hour—W. & R. Chambers—Cassell & Co.—Clifford's Inn—Owens College Jubilee—Newspapers at the time of the Coronation of Queen Victoria—Chorley's Hymn on the birth of King Edward VII.—The British Academy: charter granted by the King—Philip James Bailey161-178


The GlobeThe Field—Lord Brougham's reported death in 1839—First Christmas card—Longest telegram—'The Newspaper Press Directory'—The Daily Telegraph 179-199


The Saturday Review—G. J. Holyoake—Elizabeth Barrett Browning—The Post Office 200-225


His father—First poem—Visits Italy—Marries Mary Storer Potter—Her death—He considers his poetic career finished—'Voices of the Night'—Marries Frances Elizabeth Appleton—Death of his father—Great success of 'Hiawatha'—Death of his second wife—His last visit to Europe—Enthusiastic reception in England—Visits Tennyson—Returns home—Children celebrate his birthday—Death and funeral—Sorrow in America and England—Bust in the Abbey226-240


The City Press—The Thames Embankment—London's roll of fame—Black Friday—Goschen converts the 3 per Cents—Dr. Reginald R. Sharpe—Guildhall Library—Lord Mayor's precedence—City Temple pulpit—Report on Coronation privileges—The Fire Brigade241-259


Hodgson & Sons—Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge—Puttick & Simpson—Earl Howe's Shakespeare Quartos and Folios—The Indian Mutiny—The Bookseller—Trade Dinners—The Simpkins— Longmans—John Murray—Smith, Elder & Co.—Macmillans Richard Bentley—George Bentley—Blackwoods—John Camden Hotten—Henry Bohn—Quaritch—the Sotherans—Frederic Norgate—The Lockwoods—Nicholas Trübner260-286


CHAPTER XIV.

JOSEPH WOODFALL EBSWORTH.

His godfather Woodfall—His father becomes a bookseller in Edinburgh—Young Ebsworth's recollections of Scott, O'Connell, and Queen Victoria's first visit to Edinburgh—Exhibits his views of Edinburgh at the Scottish Academy—Death of Hugh Miller—Ebsworth contributes to Hogg's Instructor and Bradshaw's Magazine—Goes to Glasgow School of Design—Goes to Cambridge—Friendships with Ellicott, Kingsley, and others—His ordination—Buries an unbaptized child—Wins the hearts of the gipsies—His marriage—Becomes Vicar of Molash—His friend John Muir Wood—Retires from Molash and devotes himself to Ballad history—Death of his wife—His 'Cavalier Lyrics'—His death—His love for his father and mother—His connexion with the Hill family—Ebsworth on Rossetti, Byron, F. W. Robinson, Samuel Rawson Gardiner, Hazlitt, 'Astarte,' Mrs. Oliphant, George Gilfillan, Omar Khayyam, and the Brontës—Letters from the Brontës' father—Ebsworth on Macaulay—Contributions to the 'Dictionary of National Biography' Star and Garter dinner—Dedicates 'Roxburghe Ballads' to Queen —Halliwell-Phillipps—J. P. Collier—Bibliography—His MSS.—Last words289-325


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1916, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.