Old Towns and New Needs; also the Town Extension Plan

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Old Towns and New Needs; and The Town Extension Plan  (1912) 
Paul Waterhouse and Raymond Unwin
Warburton lectures for 1912, University of Manchester

OLD TOWNS AND NEW NEEDS: ALSO THE
TOWN EXTENSION PLAN: BEING THE
WARBURTON LECTURES FOR 1912
DELIVERED BY PAUL WATERHOUSE M.A.
AND RAYMOND UNWIN F.R.I.B.A.




MANCHESTER : AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS
MCMXII.


NOTE.

These lectures were delivered under the provisions of the Warburton Trust which is constituted under the Will of the late Mr. Alderman Warburton, of Manchester, who died in the year 1887.

The following lectures were delivered at Manchester University on January 22nd and 29th, 1912.



Contents.
page
Note iv

List of Illustrations.
vii

Old Towns and New Needs.
By Paul Waterhouse, M.A., F.R.I.B.A. 1–30

The Town Extension Plan.
By Raymond Unwin, F.R.I.B.A. 33–62



List of Illustrations.
 
Fig. 1.   Wren's Plan for rebuilding the City of London after the Fire, placed among the present surroundings of the City.  
To face page 10
Fig. 2. An "over-and-under" or viaduct crossing. A proposed treatment for the intersection of the main avenues, advocated by the Royal Commission on London Traffic.
To face page 17
Fig. 3. A suggested "gyratory crossing" round All Souls Church, Langham Place, London, in connection with one of the Avenues proposed by the London Traffic Commission. The arrows indicate the course of the traffic.
To face page 19
Fig. 4. Plan of a City on a river approached by eight main roads. Each road is bifurcated before entering the centre of the town.
page 22
Fig. 5. Diagram illustrating a town developed on a definite plan.
Between pages 48 and 49
Fig. 6. Diagram showing similar areas each of 10 acres, developed with a larger or smaller number of houses to the acre, together with the cost of development.
Between pages 52 and 53
Fig. 7. Diagram illustrating the increased area of land required for building purposes if the whole of the population, in a town having an annual increase of 17,000 people, were provided for (I.) at the rate of 34 houses per acre, and (II.) 15 houses per acre.
page 55
Fig. 8. Diagram showing how to reduce the pressure of population in the centre of London by one third its present inhabitants.
To face page 60
Fig. 9. Diagram illustrating how the population which can be accommodated in a town increases much more rapidly than the average distance of the dwellings from the centre of the town.
To face page 60