Our Land (Coates)

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For works with similar titles, see Our Land.
Fugitive verse by Florence Earle Coates
Our Land
Published in Harper's Monthly Magazine (April 1919).

   ...She opened a great Door ;
Enlarged the human mind, and
   made men see
That he who shares his freedom is
   most free.—FEC

Our Land

BY FLORENCE EARLE COATES

THE gift of an idealist,
She came of vision, and the dream
Of one who saw beyond vast waters gleam
The light of a new world without a name:
 A gift of Life she came—.
She, the renascence from Earth's ancient woe,
With Raphael born and Michel Angelo.


Noiseless, the patient years went by,
And only red-men cared to roam
Her glorious streams, and call her mountains home.
Then came to her, like pilgrims of the Grail
 Whose courage could not fail,
Others, sad exiles, longing to be free—
Seekers of God and human liberty!


A blessèd, blessèd Land! She gave
Ideals, to mankind unknown,
And toiling, taught a wondering world to own
The dignity of toil, despised before:
 She opened a great Door;
Enlarged the human mind, and made men see
That he who shares his freedom is most free.


Oh, strong and beautiful and brave,—
The Titan-Mother of the West,—
Gathering in her arms and to her breast
The hurt, unfriended, weary, and forlorn,
 Outcast, and alien-born!
How should the unfriended poor beyond the seas
Not yearn to her—the new Hesperides?. . .


Full garners were her toil's reward;
But, laboring, alway she dreams.
Mistake her not! Mid clouds her eagle screams,
Emblem of liberty that nothing bars,
 And on her brow are stars—
Stars whose pure radiance is not all of earth,
Enkindled there where Justice had its birth.


Belovèd Land! Apart, she smiled!
But, oh, more glorious to-day,
Life's Larger Summons eager to obey,
Her strength outpoured to succor and befriend
 A World, wide without end,
She waits—how earningly!—the hour to come
When laurelled Peace shall lead her heroes home!


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1927, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.