Our Native Ferns and Their Allies 6th ed

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Our native ferns and their allies,
with synoptical descriptions of the American Pteridophyta north of Mexico
 (1900) 
by Lucien Marcus Underwood
Our Native Ferns - Carboniferous Pteridophyta.jpg

CARBONIFEROUS PTERIDOPHYTA.—(After Dana)

OUR
NATIVE FERNS
AND
THEIR ALLIES
WITH
Synoptical Descriptions of the American
Pteridophyta North of Mexico
BY
LUCIEN MARCUS UNDERWOOD
SIXTH EDITION, REVISED
Henry Holt and Company 1900 Logo.png
NEW YORK
HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY
1900

Copyright, 1888, 1900,
BY
HENRY HOLT & CO
ROBERT DRUMMOND, PRINTER, NEW YORK.

PREFACE.

When the writer issued this little book in 1880 as the honest effort of a novice to provide for the study of our ferns a convenient handbook by means of which they might be identified, he had no idea that the first edition would be exhausted within a year, and much less that a sixth edition would ever be called for.   Though frequently urged to extend its scope, he has felt that if, with all the traces of its early imperfections of plan, there is still a demand for such a handbook, it is best to leave it in its original form, with only such changes as our changed conceptions of structures, relationships, and definition of species demand.  Not only is this preservation of the original plan in harmony with the feeling of sentiment, but it seems the more desirable since the writer is preparing a monograph of all the North American Ferns (including those of the West Indies and the continent as far as the Isthmus), and in this more elaborate work he hopes from a study of a wider range of forms to include many more general matters that our own limited fern flora, though quite diverse, do not furnish a sufficient basis for inclusion here, and others still that would be out of place in an elementary manual.

Changes in this edition are mostly verbal and such as arise from the modifications of nomenclature or the changed ideas of homologies and relations of structures.   The chapter on nomenclature has been wholly rewritten and extended, particularly because the present edition more than any other contributes to a modification of generic names.

In the systematic part the sequence has also been modified, bringing the simpler eusporangiate forms first and introducing the desirable distinction between orders and families which botanists have too long confused.   The number of species is considerably increased, owing, in part to new discoveries and in part to the seeming necessity of reestablishing the earlier and in many cases clearer views of the earlier writers on ferns, many of whose species have been "reduced to synonymy by the English (Kew) school of fern writers whose dictum has hitherto been followed by American fern students.  The number of genera has also been increased in accordance with the views of earlier and more scientific fern students.

Columbia University,  June, 1900.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction
Chapter I. Haunts and Habits of Ferns
II. The Organs of the Growing Fern
III. Fructification in Ferns
IV. Germination of Fern Spores
V. Fern Structure
VI. The Fern Allies
VII. Classification And Nomenclature
VIII. The Fern's Place in Nature
IX. Distribution in Time and Space
 
OUR NATIVE PTERIDOPHYTA.
ORDER FILICALES.
Family 1. Ophioglossaceae
2. Hymenophyllaceae
3. Schizaeaceae
4. Osmundaceae
5. Ceratopteridaceae
6. Polypouiaceae
7. Marsiliaceae
8. Salviniaceae
 
ORDER EQUISETALES.
Family 1. Equisetaceae
 
ORDER LYCOPODIALES.
Family 1. Lycopodiaceae
2. Selaginellaceae
3. Iscetaceae
Abbreviations
Glossary and Index