Page:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 1.djvu/409

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COOKE.
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minster Abbey. In 1752 he was appointed successor to Dr. Pepusch as conductor at the Academy of Ancient Music. In September 57, on the resignation of Bernard Gates, he obtained the appointment of master of the choristers of Westminster Abbey, and on Jan. 27, 58, that of lay vicar there. On July 1, 62, on the death of Robinson, Cooke was appointed organist of the Abbey. In 75 he took the degree of Doctor of Music at Cambridge, and in 82 was admitted to the same degree at Oxford. In the latter year he was elected organist of St. Martin-in-the-Fields. In 1789 he resigned the conductorship of the Academy of Ancient Music to Dr. Arnold. He died Sept. 14, 1793, and was buried in the cloisters of Westminster Abbey, where a mural tablet, with a fine canon, records his skill and worth. Dr. Cooke's compositions, which are voluminous, are for the church, concert-room, and chamber. For the theatre he produced nothing except an ode for Dr. Delap's tragedy, 'The Captives,' 1786. His church music comprises the fine service in G, and one composed in 1787 at the request of Lord Heathfield for the use of the garrison in Gibraltar; two anthems composed in 1748 and 49 for the Founder's day at the Charter House; an anthem with orchestral accompaniments for the funeral of William, Duke of Cumberland, 1764; another of the same description, for the installation of the Bishop of Osnaburg, afterwards Duke of York, as Knight of the Bath, 1772; and fourteen others, besides several chants and psalm and hymn tunes. For the Academy of Ancient Music he added choruses and accompaniments to Pergolesi's 'Stabat Mater,' 1759, and to Galliard's 'Morning Hymn' (printed 1773); and composed an Ode for Christmas Day, 1763; 'The Syrens' Song to Ulysses'; Collins's Ode on the Passions (printed 1784); Ode on the Genius of Chatterton, 1786; and Ode on the King's recovery, 1789. But the compositions by which he is best known, and which will convey his name to posterity, are his numerous and beautiful glees, canons, etc. For seven of these (five glees, a canon, and a catch) the Catch Club awarded him prizes. Dr. Cooke published in his life-time a collection of his glees, and a second collection appeared in 1795 under the care of his son Robert. Twenty-nine glees, and eleven rounds catches and canons by Dr. Cooke are printed in Warren's collections. His instrumental compositions consist of organ pieces, concertos for the orchestra, marches, and harpsichord lessons. Apart from his eminence as a composer and practical musician, Dr. Cooke was one of the best and most learned theorists of his time. [App. p.597 adds that "he was an assistant director at the Handel Commemoration in 1784."]

[ W. H. H. ]

COOKE, Henry—'Captain Cooke'—was educated in the Chapel Royal of Charles I. On the breaking out of the civil war he joined the king's army, and obtained, in 1642, a captain's commission. During the Commonwealth he subsisted by teaching music. On the re-establishment of the Chapel Royal in 1660, Cooke was appointed one of the gentlemen and master of the children. In 1663 he obtained a grant for himself and his successors of £30 per annum for the diet, lodging, washing, and teaching of each of the children of the chapel. In July 1664 he was appointed 'Composer of the king's private music for voices,' at a yearly salary of £40. Cooke died July 13, 1672, and was buried on July 17 in the east cloister of Westminster Abbey. Antony Wood asserts that his death was hastened by chagrin at finding himself supplanted in favour by Pelham Humfrey, who had been his pupil. Cooke retained the title of 'captain' until his death. He composed several anthems, the words of which are contained in Clifford's collection, and a processional hymn which was performed at Windsor at the festival of the Knights of the Garter, April 17, 1661. He also contributed some of the music to Davenant's 'First Day's Entertainment at Rutland House' in 1657 [App. p.597 "1656"]. [App. p.597 adds that "he composed all the special music for the coronation of Charles II, April 23, 1661."]

[ W. H. H. ]

COOKE, Nathaniel, born at Bosham, near Chichester, in 1773, was nephew of Matthew Cooke, organist of St. George, Bloomsbury, from whom he received the chief part of his musical education. He became organist of the parish church of Brighton, for the use of the choir of which he published a Collection of Psalm and Hymn tunes, including some of his own compositions, which long continued in favour. He also published some small pieces for the pianoforte.

[ W. H. H. ]

COOKE, Robert, son of Dr. Benjamin Cooke, succeeded his father, on his death in 1793, as organist of St. Martin-in-the-Fields. On the death of Dr. Arnold, in 1802, he was appointed organist and master of the choristers of Westminster Abbey. In 1814 he unfortunately became deranged, and in a paroxysm of his disorder drowned himself in the Thames. Robert Cooke composed an Evening Service in C and an anthem, 'An Ode to Friendship,' and several songs and glees. Three of the latter obtained prizes at the Catch Club. A collection of eight of his glees was published by the author in 1805. [App. p.597 adds "dates of birth and death, 1768 and Aug. 13, 1814."]

[ W. H. H. ]

COOKE, Thomas Simpson, familiarly known as Tom Cooke, was born in Dublin in 1782. Evincing early a taste for music he studied under his father, and made such rapid progress as to perform in public a violin concerto when only seven years of age. He received instruction in composition from Giordani. When only fifteen he was appointed leader of the band at the theatre in Crow Street, Dublin, in which situation he continued several years, and composed several musical pieces. On one of his benefit nights he announced himself to sing the tenor part of The Seraskier, in Storace's opera 'The Siege of Belgrade,' an experiment which proved quite successful, and led to his removal to London, where he made his first appearance, in the same character, at the English Opera House, Lyceum, on July 13, 1813. On Sept. 14, 1815, he appeared as Don Carlos in 'The Duenna,' at Drury Lane Theatre, where he continued as a principal tenor singer for nearly twenty years. During this period, on one of his