Page:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 1.djvu/617

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GODDARD.
605
GOD SAVE THE KING.

public in England, but which she played without book. The winter of 1854 and the whole of 55 were passed by Miss Goddard in Germany and Italy. She carried her classical répertoire with her; played inter alia at the Gewandhaus Concert Oct. 1855; and was received with enthusiasm by some of the best critics of Germany. Returning to this country, she made her first appearance at the Philharmonic on June 9, 1856, in Sterndale Bennett's Concerto in C minor (then in MS.); at the Crystal Palace (in Moscheles' Concerto in E) on March 13, 58, and at the Monday Popular Concerto on March 9, 59.

In 1857 and 58 Miss Goddard played in London all the last sonatas of Beethoven (from op. 101 to 111)—at that time almost absolute novelties to most of her hearers—as well as many other masterpieces by Clementi, Dussek, Mozart, Mendelssohn, and other masters, either solo or with accompaniment of stringed instruments, in addition to the usual classical Concertos, Trios, Sonatas, etc. In 1860 she married Mr. Davison, who, as already stated, was her real master and the former of her taste. In 1873 Madame Goddard left this country for a lengthened tour through America, Australia, and India, returning in the autumn of 76, and making her first reappearance in two recitals at St. James's Hall on Oct. 12 and 19.

[ G. ]

GODFREY. A family of English military band-masters. Charles Godfrey, the founder, was born in 1790 at Kingston, Surrey; in 1813 joined the Coldstreams as a bassoon-player, and soon became band-master, a post which he filled with honour till his death, Dec. 12, 1863, at his house in Vincent Square, Westminster, after 50 years' service. He was appointed Musician in Ordinary to the King in 1831, and was one of the Court of Assistants of the Royal Society of Musicians. The first journal of military music published in this country, under the name of 'Jullien's Journal,' was arranged by Mr. Godfrey. His three sons were educated at the Royal Academy of Music. Daniel, the eldest, was born in 1831, and has been band-master of the Grenadier Guards since 1856. In 1872 he took his band to the United States—the first visit of an English military band since the Independence. He is well known here and abroad by his waltzes for military band—'Guards,' 'Mabel,' 'Hilda,' etc.

The second, Adolphus Frederick, born in 1837, succeeded his father in the Coldstreams, and is still band-master of that regiment [App. p.650 "date of death, Aug. 28, 1882"]. Charles, the third, born in 1839, joined the Scots Fusiliers as band-master in 1859 and left that regiment in 1868 for a similar position in the Royal Horse Guards, which he now fills (1878).

[ G. ]

GOD SAVE THE KING. The so-called 'National Anthem' of England, a tune in two sections, the first of 6 bars, the second of 8.

{ \time 3/4 \key g \major \relative g' { g4 g a fis4. g8 a4 b b c | b4. a8 g4 a g fis g2. \bar "||" d'4 d d d4. c8 b4 c c c c4. b8 a4 b c8[ b] a[ g] b4. c8 d4 | c b a g2. \bar "||" } \addlyrics { God save our no -- ble Queen, Long live our gra -- cious Queen, God save the Queen! Send her vic -- tor -- i -- ous, Hap -- py and glor -- i -- ous, Long to _  reign _ o -- ver us, God save the Queen. } }

O Lord our God, arise,
Scatter our enemies,
 And make them fall.
Confound their politics.
Frustrate their knavish tricks,
On Thee our hopes we fix,
 God save us all.

Thy choicest gifts in store
On her be pleased to pour,
 Long may she reign.
May she defend our laws,
And ever give us cause
To sing with heart and voice,
 God save the Queen.

Its first public performance is stated to have been at a dinner in 1740 to celebrate the taking of Portobello by Admiral Vernon (Nov. 20, 1739), when it is said to have been sung by Henry Carey as his own composition, both words and music. The nearest known copy to that date is that in the 'Harmonia Anglicana' of 1742 or 43, as follows[1]. It is marked 'for two voices,' but we give the melody only.

{ \time 3/4 \key g \major \relative g' { g4 g a fis4. g8 a4 b b c | a4. a8 b4 a fis4. g8 g2. \bar "||" d'4 d d d4. c8 b4 c c c c4. b8 a4 b c8[ b] a[ g] b4. c8 d4 | c a4. g8 g2. \bar "||" } \addlyrics { God save our Lord the King, Long live our nob -- le King, God save the King! Send him vic -- tor -- i -- ous, Hap -- py and glor -- i -- ous, Long to _  reign _ o -- ver us, God save the King. } }

O Lord our God, arise,
Scatter our enemies,
 And make them fall.
Confound their politics.
Frustrate their knavish tricks,
On him our hopes are fix'd,
 O save us all.


This is the nearest we can arrive at to the original form of the air and words, and both will be found somewhat different from those with which we are familiar. The fact that Henry Carey was the author of both is testified to by J. Christopher Smith, Handel's amanuensis, and by Dr. Harington; but for the evidence the reader must be referred to Mr. Chappell's full statement in his 'Popular Music,' pp. 694, 5, and to Chrysander's 'Jahrbücher' (i. 287–407). In 1745 it became publicly known by being sung at the theatres as 'a loyal song or anthem' during the Scottish Rebellion. The Pretender was proclaimed at Edinburgh Sept. 16, and the first appearance of 'God save the King' was at Drury Lane, Sept. 28. For a month or so it was much sung at both Covent Garden and

  1. See Chappell's 'Popular Music,' ii. 704.