Page:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 2.djvu/45

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
JEBB.
33
JEPHTHAH.

ford and Rector of Peterstow, Herefordshire, an able writer on choral service. His works include 'Three Lectures on the Cathedral Service of the United Church of England and Ireland,' delivered at Leeds in 1841 and published in that year; 'The Choral Service of the United Church of England and Ireland, being an Inquiry into the Liturgical System of the Cathedral and Collegiate foundations of the Anglican Communion,' 8vo. 1843; 'The Choral Responses and Litanies of the United Church of England and Ireland,' 2 vols. fol. 1847–57 (an interesting and valuable collection); and 'Catalogue of Ancient Choir Books at St. Peter's College, Cambridge.' He edited Thos. Caustun's 'Venite exultemus and Communion Service.'

[ W. H. H. ]

JEFFRIES, George, steward to Lord Hatton, of Kirby, Northamptonshire (where he had lands of his own), and organist to Charles I. at Oxford in 1643, composed many anthems and motets, both English and Latin, still extant in MS. Several are in the Aldrich collection at Christ Church, Oxford, and nearly one hundred—eighty of them in the composer's autograph—are in the library of the Sacred Harmonic Society. His son Christopher, student of Christ Church, was a good organist.

[ W. H. H. ]

JEFFRIES, Stephen, born 1660, was a chorister of Salisbury Cathedral under Michael Wise. In 1680 he was appointed organist of Gloucester Cathedral. He composed a peculiar melody for the cathedral chimes, printed in Hawkins' History, chap. 160. He died in 1713.

[ W. H. H. ]

JEITTELES, Alois. [See Liederkreis.]

JENKINS, JOHN, born at Maidstone in 1592, became a musician in early life. He was patronised by two Norfolk gentlemen, Dering and Hamon L'Estrange, and resided in the family of the latter for a great portion of his life. He was a performer on the lute and lyra-viol and other bowed instruments, and one of the musicians to Charles I and Charles II. He was a voluminous composer of Fancies, some for viols and others for the organ; he also produced Borne light pieces which he called 'Rants.' Of these 'The Mitter Rant,' an especial favourite, was printed in Playford's 'Musick's Handmaid,' 1678, and other publications of the period. Two others by him, 'The Fleece Tavern Rant,' and 'The Peterborough Rant,' are in Playford's 'Apollo's Banquet,' 1690. Another popular piece by him was 'The Lady Katherine Audley's Bells, or, The Five Bell Consort,' first printed in Playford's 'Courtly Masquing Ayres,' 1662. His vocal compositions comprise an Elegy on the death of William Lawes, printed at the end of H. and W. Lawes' 'Choice Psalms,' 1648; 'Theophila, or, Love's Sacrifice; a Divine Poem by E[dward] B[enlowe] Esq., several parts thereof set to fit aires by Mr. J. Jenkins,' 1652; two rounds, 'A boat, a boat,' and 'Come, pretty maidens,' in Hilton's 'Catch that catch can,' 1652; some songs etc. in 'Select Ayres and Dialogues,' 1659; and 'The Musical Companion,' 1672; and some anthems. He published in 1660 'Twelve Sonatas for two Violins and a Base with a Thorough Base for the Organ or Theorbo' (reprinted at Amsterdam, 1664), the first of the kind produced by an Englishman. His numerous 'Fancies' were never printed. Many MS. copies of them however exist, a large number being at Christ Church, Oxford. J. S. Smith included many of Jenkins's compositions (amongst them 'The Mitter Rant' and 'Lady Audley's Bells') in his 'Musica Antiqua.' Jenkins resided during the latter years of his life in the family of Sir Philip Wodehouse, Bart., at Kimberley, Norfolk, where he died Oct. 27, 1678. He was buried Oct. 29 in Kimberley Church.

[ W. H. H. ]

JENNY BELL, an opéra comique in 3 acts; words by Scribe, music by Auber. Produced at the Opéra Comique June 2, 1855. The scene is laid in England and the characters are English, and the airs of God save the King and Rule Britannia are introduced.

[ G. ]

JENSEN, Adolph, composer, born Jan. 12, 1837, at Königsberg, was a pupil of Ehlert and F. Marpurg. In 1856 he visited Russia, but returned the next year to Germany, and was for a short time Capellmeister at Posen. He then paid a two years visit to Copenhagen, where he became intimate with Gade, 1860 to 66 were spent in his native place, and to this time a large proportion of his works (op. 6–33) are due. From 1866 to 68 he was attached to Tausig's school as teacher of the piano, and since that time resided on account of his health at Gratz and other places in South Germany. He died at Baden Baden, Jan. 24, 1879 [App. p.685 "Jan. 23"].

Jensen was an enthusiast for Schumann, and for some months before Schumann's death was in close correspondence with him. He has published various pieces, 62 opp. in all—'The Journey to Emmaus,' for Orchestra; 'Nonnengesang,' for Women's Chorus, Horn, Harp, and Piano; two Liedercyclus, 'Dolorosa' and 'Erotikon'; and many other songs; Sonatas and smaller pieces for Piano, which take high rank in his own country, and are much beloved by those who know them here. His genius is essentially that of a songwriter—full of delicate tender feeling, but with no great heights or depths. [App. p.685 "the score of an opera 'Turandot' was found after his death."]

[ G. ]

JEPHTHA. 1. Handel's last oratorio. His blindness came on during its composition and delayed it. It was begun Jan. 21, and finished Aug. 30, 1751. The words were by Dr. Morell. Produced at Covent Garden Feb. 26, 1752. Revived by the Sacred Harmonic Society April 7, 1841. [Quaver, iv. 766b.] 2. 'Jefte in Masfa' (Jephthah at Mizpeh) was the title of a short oratorio by Semplice, set by Barthelemon at Florence in 1776; performed there, in Rome—where a chorus from it even penetrated to the Pope's chapel, and procured the composer two gold medals—and in London in 1779 and 82. A copy of it is in the Sacred Harmonic Society's Library. 3. Jephtha and his Daughter. An oratorio in 2 parts; the words adapted from the Bible, the music by C. Reinthaler. Produced in England by Mr. Hullah at St. Martin's Hall April 16, 1856.

[ G. ]