Page:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 4.djvu/456

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440

��WELSH MUSIC.

��WELSH MUSIC.

��Until within the present century, very little Welsh music was known beyond the Principality ; and even then, for the most part, through an un- favourable medium. For example, the graceful Llwyn onn ' (The Ash Grove), appeared in a mutilated form as 'Cease your funning,' in Gay's

  • Beggar's Opera,' A.D. 1728.

Llwyn onn. (The Ash Grove.) Gracefully. ^ -

� �^^ S ' ^

� �J* ft N fr p s j! ft : * k * H ^

�, j | UfTf

�=23 1 1 j J 1

�- *- -g C-Ji*-^- -j^-* ft ^J 1 ^ 1 "!

The bold and warlike strain, 'Y Gadlys' (The Camp), suffered the degradation of being wedded to Tom Durfey's doggrel song 'Of noble race was Shenkin,' introduced into 'The Rich- mond Heiress,' A.D. 1693.

Y Gadlys. (The Camp.)

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�i i .1 ~z

m J 1 ! |

�<&j*^ll\r r ^

�- _^=i

� � �1 J j-i"3 '- -H

�Gay's version, as ' Cease your funning.'

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�W n *

�P r - - - i

-> t * 1 r f~M 1

�"T^ ^T IS

� � �The beautiful little melody, 'Ar hyd y nos' (All through the Night), was introduced into a burlesque, under the title of ' Ah ! hide your nose.' It is often known as ' Poor Mary Ann.'

Ar hyd y nos. (All through the Night). Slowly.

� � �The melodious 'Clychau Aberdyfi' (The Bells of Aberdovey) was caricatured in Charles Dib- din's play 'Liberty Hall,' A.D. 1785.

Clychau Aberdyfi. (The Bells of Aberdovey.)

f)S Livcly L c u -* *

� � � � �^Uter^

�Even Handel was not above introducing the spirited air, ' Codiad yr Haul' (The Rising of the Sun), into 'Acis and Galatea,' as a duet and chorus, under the title of ' Happy, happy we.' The following is the original air :

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�E 1 =i M-| ^ K m N ft ^ S M

� �- n cl j * c> JiwJ^a

�(M) ft :3 1 1 b~f J * 1 1 '" 1 1

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