Page:A Few Hours in a Far Off Age.djvu/4

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been validated.


A FEW HOURS IN A FAR-OFF AGE.


CHAPTER I.

"The new claim of woman to a political status is itself an honourable testimony to the civilization which has given her a civil status new in history. Now that by the increased humanity of law she controls her property, she inevitably takes the next step to her share in power."

Progress of Culture, RALPH WALDO EMERSON. 

"The truth is in the air, and the most impressionable brain will announce it first, but all will announce it a few minutes later. So woman, as most impressionable is the best index of the coming hour."

Conduct of Life, RALPH WALDO EMERSON. 

I STAND in the doorway of an immense building, which appears to be devoted to the display of antiquities. Many people are entering, although the morning is young. A magnificent scene is before me.

At last I see a city in which are combined grandeur, cleanliness, order and picturesque loveliness. Between this one and those of the nineteenth century exists a difference as great, if not greater, than between the latter and the loathsome lairs of our cannibal progenitors reeking with refuse of human remains. My mind power has so widened that I know more than can be here told.

The buildings are truly grand works of art. All stand on noble columns of great size and strength. I cannot recog-