Page:A Thousand-Mile Walk To The Gulf.djvu/68

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A Thousand-Mile Walk

ers have been killed or driven away during the war."

Arriving at the last house, my knock at the door was answered by a bright, good-natured, good-looking little woman, who in reply to my request for a night s lodging and food, said, " Oh, I guess so. I think you can stay. Come in and I’ll call my husband." "But I must first warn you," I said, "that I have nothing smaller to offer you than a five-dollar bill for my entertainment. I don’t want you to think that I am trying to impose on your hospitality."

She then called her husband, a blacksmith, who was at work at his forge. He came out, hammer in hand, bare-breasted, sweaty, begrimed, and covered with shaggy black hair. In reply to his wife s statement, that this young man wished to stop over night, he quickly replied, "That’s all right; tell him to go into the house." He was turning to go back to his shop, when his wife added, " But he says he has n’t any change to pay. He has nothing smaller than a five-dollar bill." Hesitating only a mo-

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