Page:American History Told by Contemporaries, v2.djvu/35

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No. 3]
7
Classification

(Nos. 135, 154) ; Patrick Henry (No. 203). Many of these men were highly educated, all had unrivalled opportunities of knowing the actual forces of colonial history, and some became the advisers of the English government, among them Pownall and Hutchinson.

Other colonial worthies who appear below are Samuel Sewall (Nos. 18, 103) ; Roger Wolcott (No. 22) ; John Conrad Wyser (No. 29) ; Samuel Quincy (No. 41) ; President Clap (No. 90); Increase Mather (No. 93) ; Nathaniel Ames (No. 95) ; Lewis Morris (No. 97) ; Colonel Brewton (No. 118).

The following English and foreign statesmen and publicists have also been used: Edward Randolph (No. 34) ; Oglethorpe (No. 39) ; Edmund Burke (Nos. 44, 52) ; John Wise (No. 47) ; Montesquieu (No. 51) ; William Pitt, Lord Chatham (Nos. 128, 142) ; Earl of Waldegrave (No. 130) ; John Wilkes (No. 132) ; Horace Walpole (No. 145) ; Samuel Johnson (No. 156) ; Lafayette (No. 172) ; Mirabeau (No. 178) Vergennes (No. 216).

Besides the governors and other colonial officials mentioned above, large use has been made of the writings of the great statesmen of the revolutionary epoch. The works of Benjamin Franklin (Nos. 68, 81, 94, 133, 143, 199, 217), of John Adams (Nos. 24, 79, 153, 189, 217), and of George Washington (Nos. 108, 174, 195, 206) are the foundation of an accurate knowledge of the actual workings of the revolutionary spirit. To these may be added the writings of Josiah Quincy (No. 139); Alexander Hamilton (No. 173) ; Thomas Jefferson (No. 188) ; Robert Morris (Nos. 194, 210) ; James Madison (No. 211) ; John Jay (No. 217) ; and Henry Laurens (No. 217).

The pamphleteers and controversial writers include several of the above, and also Edward Randolph (No. 34) ; Jeremiah Dummer (No. 48) ; Keith (No. 49) ; Pownall (Nos. 53, 59, 66, 74) ; Zenger (No. 72) ; Francis Hopkinson (Nos. 96, 196) ; Thomas Story (No. 98) ; Judge Sewall (No. 103) ; Stephen Hopkins (No. 125) ; James Otis (No. 131) ; John Wilkes (No. 132) ; Martin Howard (No. 138); Dennis de Berdt (No. 146) ; Charles Chauncy (No. 147) ; John Dickinson (No. 149) ; Samuel Johnson (No. 156) ; Drayton (No. 157) ; Timothy Dwight (No. 164) ; Jonathan Odell (No. 167); Mirabeau (No. 178) ; Stansbury (No. 182) ; Thomas Paine (No. 186).

On the Revolution, and to a less degree on the earlier period, valuable extracts have been taken from the journals, private letters, and reminiscences of those who had knowledge of public affairs. While less formal