Page:American History Told by Contemporaries, v2.djvu/36

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[No. 3
How to find Sources

than the public records, or the careful state papers and official correspondence and arguments of the statesmen mentioned above, they have the value of unstudied testimony, and they cause an impression of the human side of the history. The principal authors of this kind cited in this volume are Sewall (No. 18) ; Eliza Lucas (Nos. 35, 83) ; Stephens (No. 43) ; Pettit (No. 61) ; John Adams (Nos. 79, 153, 189) ; Franklin (No. 81) ; Nathaniel Ames (No. 95) ; Thomas Story (No. 98) ; Wesley (No. 99) ; John Woolman (No. 106) ; Eddis (No. 107) ; Washington (No. 108) ; Daniel Boon (No. 134) ; Josiah Quincy (No. 139) ; Thomas Hutchinson (No. 148); John Tudor (No. 151) ; John Andrews (No. 152) ; Stephen Williams (No. 160) ; Alexander Scammell (No. 162) ; Huntington (No. 163) ; Odell (No. 167) ; Curwen (No. 169) ; Richard Smith (No. 185) ; Mrs. Abigail Adams (No. 192) ; William Pynchon (No. 208).

Other journals and letters more directly concerned with military affairs are those of Curwen (No. 120) ; Colonel Winslow (No. 126) ; anonymous account of Braddock's defeat (No. 127) ; Captain John Knox (No. 129) ; Chastellux (Nos. 137, 176) ; Graydon (No. 170) ; Lafayette (No. 172) ; Thacher (No. 175) ; Drowne (No. 177) ; Pausch (No. 179) ; Boudinot (No. 180) ; Simcoe (No. 181) ; Andr (No. 183) ; Clinton (No. 193) ; Baroness Riedesel (No. 197) ; Dr. Waldo (No. 198) ; John Trumbull (No. 200) ; George Rogers Clark (No. 201) ; Steuben (No. 202) ; John Paul Jones (No. 204) ; General Greene (No. 212) ; Lord Cornwallis (No. 214) ; General Heath (No. 218).

Travellers in the eighteenth century, until the Revolution ,was impending, were fewer and less quaint than in the period before 1689. The principal foreign visitors and observers were Andrew Burnaby (No. 32) and Peter Kalm (Nos. 112, 114, 122), both authors who wrote interesting and intelligent accounts. Lesser foreigners were Bolzius (No. 40); "A Swiss Gentleman" (No. 69); De la Harpe (No. 109); Captain Carver (No. 116). The revolutionary visitors were Chastellux (Nos. 137, 176) ; Lafayette (No. 172) ; Pausch (No. 179) ; Baroness Riedesel (No. 197) ; Steuben (No. 202) ; the anonymous writer on De Grasse (No. 213) ; Cornwallis (No. 214).

Native or resident observers were the following : Captain Goelet (Nos. 23, 84) ; Gabriel Thomas (No. 25) ; "Richard Castelman" (No. 28) ; Keith (No. 49) ; Douglass (No. 50) ; Pownall (Nos. 53, 59, 66, 74) ; Madam Knight (No. 80) ; Benjamin Franklin (No. 81) ; Colonel Byrd (No. 82) ; Cotton Mather (No. 92) ; John Woolman (No. 106) ;