Page:An account of the English colony in New South Wales.djvu/11

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AN
ACCOUNT
OF THE
ENGLISH COLONY
IN
NEW SOUTH WALES,
FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT IN JANUARY I788, TO
AUGUST 1801:

WITH
REMARKS ON THE DISPOSITIONS, CUSTOMS, MANNERS, &c. OF
THE NATIVE INHABITANTS OF THAT COUNTRY.

TO WHICH ARE ADDED,
SOME PARTICULARS OF NEW ZEALAND;
COMPILED, BY PERMISSION,
FROM THE MSS. OF LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR KING:

AND
AN ACCOUNT OF A VOYAGE PERFORMED BY CAPTAIN FLINDERS AND MR. BASS; BY WHICH THE EXISTENCE OF A STRAIT SEPARATING VAN DIEMEN’S LAND FROM THE CONTINENT OF NEW HOLLAND WAS ASCERTAINED.

ABSTRACTED FROM THE JOURNAL OF MR. BASS.


By Lieutenant-Colonel COLLINS, of the Royal Marines;

SEVERAL YEARS JUDGE-ADVOCATE AND SECRETARY OF THE COLONY,
AND NOW LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF PORT PHILIP.


ILLUSTRATED BY NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS.
THE SECOND EDITION.

“Many might be saved, who now suffer an ignominious and an early death; and many might be so much purified in the furnace of punishment and adversity, as to become the ornaments of that society of which they had formerly been the bane. The vices of mankind must frequently require the severity of justice; but a wise State will direct that severity to the greatest moral and political good.”

Anon.

LONDON:
Printed by A. Strahan, Printers Street,
FOR T. CADELL AND W. DAVIES, IN THE STRAND.
1804.