Page:An account of the English colony in New South Wales.djvu/38

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[1787.
ACCOUNT OF THE ENGLISH COLONY
Prickly pear,—plant with the cochineal on it.
Eugenia, or pomme-rose,—a plant bearing a fruit in shape like an apple, and having the flavour and odour of a rose.
Ipecacuanha,—three sorts.
Jalap.

At the Cape of Good Hope.

The fig tree.
Bamboo.
Spanish reed.
Sugar cane.
Vines, of various sorts.
Quince.
Apple.
Pear.
Strawberry.
Oak.
Myrtle.

During the stay of the fleet at the Cape, Captain Hunter determined the longitude of the Cape-Town in Table-Bay to be, by the mean of several sets of lunar observations taken on board the Sirius, 18° 23’ 55” East from Greenwich.

Having remained in this last port of refreshment just four weeks, and every thing being arranged for its departure, the fleet proceeded with a fair wind towards New South Wales, the place of its final destination.

It was natural for the thinking part of the colonists to indulge at this moment a melancholy reflection which obtruded itself upon the mind. The land behind them was the abode of a civilized people; that before them was the residence of savages: when, if ever, they might again enjoy the commerce of the world, was very uncertain. The refreshments and pleasures of which they had so liberally partaken at the Cape, were to be exchanged for coarse fare and hard labour at New South Wales. All communication with families and friends now cut off, they were

leaving
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