Page:Austen - Sense and Sensibility, vol. II, 1811.djvu/38

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raises my influence much too high; the power of dividing two people so tenderly attached is too much for an indifferent person.”

“ ’Tis because you are an indifferent person,” said Lucy, with some pique, and laying a particular stress on those words, “that your judgment might justly have such weight with me. If you could be supposed to be biased in any respect by your own feelings, your opinion would not be worth having.”

Elinor thought it wisest to make no answer to this, lest they might provoke each other to an unsuitable increase of ease and unreserve; and was even partly determined never to mention the subject again. Another pause therefore of many minutes duration, succeeded this speech, and Lucy was still the first to end it.

“Shall