Page:Austen - Sense and Sensibility, vol. III, 1811.djvu/41

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.

( 33 )

CHAPTER. II.

Mrs. Jennings was very warm in her praise of Edward’s conduct, but only Elinor and Marianne understood its true merit. They only knew how little he had had to tempt him to be disobedient, and how small was the consolation, beyond the consciousness of doing right, that could remain to him in the loss of friends and fortune. Elinor gloried in his integrity; and Marianne forgave all his offences in compassion for his punishment. But though confidence between them was, by this public discovery, restored to its proper state, it was not a subject on which either of them were fond of dwelling when

alone.
C 5