Page:Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader.djvu/16

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AN OUTLINE OF ANGLO-SAXON GRAMMAR.

VOWELS AND DIPHTHONGS.

3. An approximate pronunciation of the vowels is indicated in the following table:

a As in German Mann
ā the preceding sound lengthened.
æ like a in at, man.
ǣ the preceding sound lengthened.
e \scriptstyle{

\left.

\begin{matrix}
\ \\ \ 
\end{matrix}

\right\}\, } as in let, men
ę
ē the preceding sound lengthened, as in they.
i as in hit, sit, in.
ī the preceding sound lengthened, as in machine.
o as in German Gott.
ō the preceding sound lengthened, as in German so.
ǫ as in not.
u as in full, put.
ū the preceding sound lengthened, as in rule.
y like ü in German: hübsch, Brücke.
ȳ the preceding sound lengthened, as in German grün.
œ̄ like ö in German schön.
ie \scriptstyle{

\left.

\begin{matrix}
\ \\ \\\ \\\ \\\ \\\ \\\ \\\ \ 
\end{matrix}

\right\}\, } These diphthongs (long and short) receive the stress upon the first element; the second elements, being unaccented, is very much obscured in pronunciation. The sound of ea, ēa is approximately that of æ+a, ǣ+a (perhaps more nearly æ+uh); otherwise the component parts of these diphthongs are to be pronounced as indicated above.
īe
ea
ēa
eo
ēo
io
īo

Note.—The diphthongs ie, īe are peculiar to EWS, where they, however, begin to change into i, ī; in LWS the most usual representation is y, ȳ. (S. §§ 22, 31, 41, 97.)