Page:Carroll - Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.djvu/68

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
There was a problem when proofreading this page.

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND


the other, and making quite a conversation of it altogether; but after a few minutes she heard a voice outside, and stopped to listen.


Carroll - Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.djvu-68.png

“Mary Ann! Mary Ann!” said the voice. “Fetch me my gloves this moment!” Then came a little pattering of feet on the stairs. Alice knew it was the Rabbit coming to look for her, and she trembled till she shook the house, quite forgetting that she was now about a thousand times as large as the Rabbit, and had no reason to be afraid of it.

Presently the Rabbit came up to the door, and tried to open it; but, as the door opened inwards, and Alice’s elbow was pressed hard against it, that attempt proved a failure. Alice heard it say to itself “Then I’ll go round and get in at the window.”

That you won’t!” thought Alice, and, after waiting till she fancied she heard the Rabbit just under the window, she suddenly spread out her hand, and made a snatch in the air. She did not get hold of anything, but she heard a little shriek and a fall, and a crash of broken glass, from which she concluded that it was just possible it had fallen into a cucumber-frame, or something of the sort.

Next came an angry voice—the Rabbit’s—“Pat!

48