Page:Diary of ten years.djvu/38

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been validated.


THE COLONY.

APPEARANCE OF THE COUNTRY—CONFLICT WITH THE NATIVES—THE NATIVES DESCRIED—DIFFICULTIES OF SOME OF THE SETTLERS—PROSPECTS OF THE COLONY—THE SCENERY ON CANNING RIVER—FREMANTLE—HINTS TO SETTLERS—NECESSARIES AND SUPERFLUITIES—OBTAIN A GRANT AT THE HEAD OF THE SWAN RIVER.

Nov. 12th, 1830.

I SEIZE the opportunity of almost the first leisure moment which I have had here, to give you a hurried account of my proceedings and prospects up to this time.

We anchored in Cockburn Sound on this day fortnight, and on the evening of the same day landed on Garden Island, where the first thing that struck us was the very unpromising appearance of the soil (which seemed to be little else than white sand) and the singularity of tolerably good crops, or rather patches, of peas, barley, turnips, radishes, &c., which it produced.

On Sunday we reached the mainland, where (on the beach) the embryo town of Fremantle is situated.

I was anxious to see the governor without loss of time, and therefore proceeded to Perth, about twelve miles up the river, in the boat of Mr. Brown, the Colonial Secretary, from whom I have received the kindest and most hospitable attention. In consequence of some depredations committed by the natives on the upper part of Swan River, Mr. Brown proceeded thither, accompanied by a few soldiers, and I took the advantage of going with him to that part of the country, but have not now time to give you a minute detail of our proceedings. Some natives were detected in the act of plundering a house, and enjoying the spoil, and seven were taken and