Page:Egotism in German Philosophy (1916).djvu/170

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170
EGOTISM IN GERMAN PHILOSOPHY

tion, 22; must continually be proved afresh, 26; is a work of genius, 155

Gobineau, 77

Goethe, 43-53; quoted, 159, 165

Good and evil above right and wrong, 124

Gospel, amended by Faust, 52; glossed by Hegelians, 105

Happiness, not for the egotist, 14, 15; he despises it, 152; not abstract nor absolute, 110, 111; attainable, 118; its nature, 152, 153

Heathenism, use of the word, 144; contrast with paganism, 145, 146; its modern form, 147, 148

Hegel, 84-98

Human nature, 117, 118

Idealism, meanings of the word, 15, 16; fosters practical materialism, 5, 69-72, 78, 81, 82; should be imposed on the young, 80; its mystical issue, 38-40

Ideals, when captious, when solid, 137

Infinity, evaded by Hegel, 88, 89; recognised again by Schopenhauer, 108, 109

Kant, 54-64; 25, 34, 35, 42

Knowledge, assumed to be impossible, 15; abuse of the term, 39, 60

Leibniz, anticipates transcendentalism, 33; his insidious theology, 104

Lessing, on truth, 129

Locke, sets the ball rolling, 32

Luther, 135, 157

Max Stirner, 99-103; quoted, 73

Montaigne, quoted, 168

Music, 16, 161

Musset, 49

Mysticism, in knowledge, 38-40; in morals, 123

Nietzsche, 114-143

Optimism, egotistical, 25, 111, 114, 116, 118, 119

Passion, not naturally egotistical, 101; may become so, 95, 98; dull in egotists, 165, 166

Paulsen, 42

Perception, terminates in things not in ideas, 19

Pessimism, inherits disregard of intrinsic values, 109; reacts against optimism, 25, 111; is arbitrary, 116

Pier Gynt, typical egotist, 13, 14

Plato, his idealism contrasted with the German, 16; his oppressive politics, 81; on inspiration, 141

Postulates of practical reason, equivocal, 58-64

Power, divers meanings of the word, 125-127

Preservation, no law of nature, 115

Progress, when illusory, 17; when real, 112

Protestantism, 21-31, 151

Religion in German philosophy, 7, 13, 75, 76, 82, 83

Rome and German genius, 150

Schopenhauer, 108-122

Selfishness, distinguished from egotism, 95, 97, 100-102, 118