Page:Fairy tales and other stories (Andersen, Craigie).djvu/16

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4
THE TINDER-BOX

'Nonsense!' said the soldier. 'Tell me directly what you're going to do with it, or I'll draw my sword and cut off your head.'

'No!' cried the witch.

So the soldier cut off her head. There she lay! But he tied up all his money in her apron, took it on his back like a bundle, put the tinder-box in his pocket, and went straight off towards the town.

That was a splendid town! He put up at the very



best inn, asked for the finest rooms, and ordered his favourite dishes, for now he was rich, having got so much money. The servant who had to clean his boots certainly thought them a remarkably old pair for such a rich gentleman; but he had not bought any new ones yet. The next day he procured proper boots and handsome clothes. Now our soldier had become a fine gentleman; and the people told him of all the splendid things which were in their city, and about the king, and what a pretty princess the king's daughter was.

'Where can one get to see her?' asked the soldier.

'She is not to be seen at all,' said they all together; she lives in a great copper castle, with a great many walls